Virginians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty

Ending the Death Penalty through Education, Organizing & Advocacy

aka VADP   |   Richmond, VA   |  www.vadp.org

Mission

Virginians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty (VADP) is a statewide citizens' organization dedicated to educating the public about alternatives to the death penalty.

Ruling year info

2014

Executive Director

Michael Stone

Main address

P.O. Box 12222

Richmond, VA 23241 USA

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Formerly known as

VIRGINIANS AGAINST STATE KILLING

VIRGINIANS FOR ALTERNATIVES TO STATE KILLING

EIN

54-1664106

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The death penalty is an outdated, ineffective, and expensive public policy that is prone to human error. Since 1976 there has been one death row exoneration for every nine executions carried out in the United States.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Public Policy

VADP's ultimate goal is abolition of the death penalty in Virginia. In the interim, VADP seeks reforms in our existing criminal justice system that have been recommended by the the 2013 ABA Virginia Death Penalty Assessment Report. These reforms will make our system fairer and more transparent until we build the bipartisan support needed to abolish capital punishment.

Population(s) Served
Adults

VADP educates people in the Commonwealth about the major problems in our existing death penalty system: 1. InnocenceSince the U.S. Supreme Court allowed the death penalty to resume, there have been 153 people exonerated from death row. These men and women were sentenced to death, but later vindicated before their execution was carried out. In the same time frame, there have been approximately 1,400 executions. That is a nearly an 11% rate of error, far too high for the ultimate punishment. 2. ArbitrarinessRace and geography play a huge role in the imposition of capital punishment. In Virginia a person is more than three times as likely to be sentenced to death when the victim is white vs. when the victim is black. In addition, the location of a homicide matters greatly. 65% of localities in Virginia have not had an execution since 1976. Just three of the 133 political jurisdictions account for 23% of all of the state's executions -- Prince William, Chesterfield & Virginia Beach. 3. CostNo cost study of the death penalty has ever been done in Virginia. Other states that have conducted studies have found that that a system with death as the maximum penalty costs significantly more than a system in which life imprisonment is the maximum penalty.

Population(s) Served
Adults

VADP mobilizes death penalty opponents at regional meetings in northern Virginia, Charlottesville, Richmond, Norfolk, and Roanoke. These gatherings take place twice a year, in the spring and fall. In addition, the VADP Executive Director is meeting with conservatives around the Commonwealth to discuss their views on capital punishment. Conservatives around the country and in Virginia are questioning the effectiveness of the death penalty as public policy. For example, Mark Earley -- a Republican Attorney General who oversaw 36 executions in Virginia -- has declared his opposition to the death penalty.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To begin a serious debate in the Virginia General Assembly about abolition of capital punishment in 2020.

In recent year, VADP has organized public support for reform measures recommended by a 2013 American Bar Association Virginia Death Penalty Assessment Team that included judges, prosecutors, and defense attorneys.

Our current two priorities are (1) legislation that would ban the execution of people with severe mental illness and (2) legislation to abolish capital punishment in Virginia.

1. Mobilize death penalty opponents regional gatherings in northern Virginia, Charlottesville, Richmond, Norfolk, and Roanoke. These regional gatherings take place twice a year – in the spring and fall.

2. Educate and organize political conservatives on capital punishment. Across the country conservatives are increasingly questioning the effectiveness of the death penalty as public policy. For example, Mark Earley – a Republican Attorney General who oversaw 36 executions in Virginia – has declared his opposition to the death penalty.

3. VADP is working with the Virginia Catholic Conference, ACLU of Virginia, and the National Alliance on Mental Illness of Virginia to pass legislation that prohibits the execution of people with serious mental illness.

1. Strong board and staff leadership.
2. Effective technology tools for organizing and fundraising.
3. A broad base of individual donors who provide the bulk of VADP funds.
4. Politically diverse allies.
5. A national network of abolition organizations that provides helpful assistance with messaging and strategy.

VADP and its allies have had dramatic success in preventing death sentences in our criminal justice system. Fewer prosecutors are seeking capital murder charges and juries are increasingly reluctant to issue a death sentence. No one has been sentenced to death in Virginia in over six years!

In the past 10-12 years we have successfully blocked efforts to expand the scope of Virginia's death penalty statute.

In January 2019 the state Senate voted in favor of a bill to exempt people with severe mental illness from capital punishment. It was the first time that either chamber of the Virginia General Assembly had ever voted to limit the death penalty in any way. It was, however, later defeated in the House of Delegates and did not become law.

Financials

Virginians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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Virginians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty

Board of directors
as of 3/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Kristina Leslie

Attorney, Federal Public Defender

Term: 2016 - 2022


Board co-chair

Jayne Barnard

Retired Law School Professor

Term: 2015 - 2021

Nicholas Cote

National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation

Adam Northup

Virginia Community Capital

Paul O’Shea

Communications & Public Relations

Kristina Leslie

Federal Public Defender

Gerald Zerkin

Attorney

Christian Braunlich

Thomas Jefferson Institute for Public Policy

Nancy Ritter

Community Volunteer

Todd Peppers

Professor of Public Affairs at Roanoke College

Carissa Phillips

Software Developer

Jimmy Culpepper

Retired safety and occupational health professional

Rob Poggenklass

Attorney

John Tucker

Catholic deacon, retired attorney

Jayne Barnard

Retired law school professor

Jean Segner

Marketing and growth strategist

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/18/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data