Food for Others, Inc.

Fairfax, VA   |  http://www.foodforothers.org

Mission

Food for Others mission is to distribute food to our neighbors in need by mobilizing our giving community and volunteers.

Ruling year info

1996

Principal Officer

Annie Turner

Main address

2938 Prosperity Ave.

Fairfax, VA 22031 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-1777157

NTEE code info

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food for Others

FFO feeds families through 4 key programs:
1. Emergency Food operations at our warehouse (open Monday-Friday, 9:30am-5pm) and mobile food pantries (open weekday evenings) provide 3-5 days’ worth of groceries to people referred to Food for Others by Fairfax County and various social service providers. Clients may shop for their food in “My Market” and select food according to their preferences. The boxes are designed to include foods which fulfill the family’s nutritional needs such as milk, eggs, frozen meat, fresh produce, as well as non-perishables like soup or rice. Clients who qualify for TEFAP may take home USDA foods as well. Spanish speaking volunteers and staff are on hand to assist clients who need Spanish translation services.
2. Neighborhood Site distributions provide supplemental food to individuals and families via volunteers who pick up food at our warehouse and deliver groceries to low-income neighborhoods. This occurs every evening, Monday through Friday, serving 16 sites. Clients do not have to provide any information to receive food other than their household size.
3. FFO’s Community Partners program provides bulk food items to 22 smaller food pantries on a weekly or bi-weekly basis. These large distributions stock the shelves of local faith-based organizations, homeless shelters, and other groups serving at-risk residents of Northern Virginia facing food insecurity.
4. The Power Pack Program (P3) provides weekend backpack food to over 2,000 Fairfax County public elementary school students identified by school personnel as in need of supplemental food. The pack, which contains two items each for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, plus two snacks and two beverages, is made up of non-perishable items which require little preparation while providing appetizing options
that children enjoy.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Food for Others

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Food for Others is working to eliminate food insecurity throughout Northern Virginia. FFO operates five programs to support families in the area struggling with food insecurity. First, we offer our USDA program for clients to pick up food twice per month. We also offer food pick up via our Emergency Box Program and our Neighborhood Sites. Food-insecure families can pick up Emergency food with a referral at our warehouse or at one of our nine mobile sites. Our neighborhood sites bring extra food directly into NOVA neighborhoods a few times a week. Food for Others also supports 23 community partners, helping to stock many smaller nearby food banks. Lastly, Food for Others works to eliminate food insecurity in Northern Virginia through our Power Pack Program. The Power Pack Program provides weekend meal packs to students at 44 schools. The program's goal is to ensure students have access to food on the weekends, so they can feel more productive and do better in school.

Food for Others is working towards Goal Number 2, Zero Hunger, by expanding its outreach to more community members and developing innovative programming to decrease food insecurity. Food for Others is currently transitioning to an empowerment focused model in which clients can select their own food items at a market and can get connections to other resources for employment, healthcare, education, etc. Food for Others also plans to expand its Power Pack Program to even more schools over the next few years, and we're currently assessing schools on a waitlist of the 2022-23 school year.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Food for Others currently serves children and families struggling with food insecurity throughout Northern Virginia. Many of the families we serve are experiencing sudden changes to their financial circumstances, such as the loss of a job or unexpected health bills. Our clients are also often recent immigrants who are struggling to afford the high costs of living in Northern Virginia. A significant portion, around 22%, of the families we serve have children. Residents over 55 also tend to have high rates of food insecurity due to financial and health barriers. During FY 2021, 24.8% of the clients we served were over 55.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In response to client surveys, we've worked to incorporate more culturally relevant foods requested by clients. For example, we ordered corn maseca flour after clients expressed interest in it.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback from our clients has inspired us to reevaluate our system for food distribution. We've altered our sorting mechanism to reduce the likelihood of bad quality food going out to clients. Our warehouse staff members advise volunteers on how to sort, both cans and produce, to ensure clients can access fresh food. We've also utilized client survey responses in the development of our new client-choice market space. We're opening the new space in Fall of 2022, and we're prioritizing the cultivation of an empowering environment.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Food for Others, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Food for Others, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 3/7/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Bobby Bhatnagar

Jeff Marin

No affiliation

Hillary West

No affiliation

Jane Brown

No affiliation

Arnoldo Borja

No affiliation

Jahangir Boroumand

No affiliation

Leigh Burke

No affiliation

Rebecca Chanin

No affiliation

William Daly

No affiliation

Maritel Dasco

No affiliation

Robert Farrell

No Affiliation

Matt Salter

No Affiliation

Sarah Scafidi

No Affiliation

Shelly Stoneman

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/26/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data