Bridge Ministry, Inc.

aka The Bridge Ministry, Inc.   |   Charlottesville, VA   |  www.bridgeministry.info

Mission

The Bridge Ministry works in Virginia to transform the lives of troubled men and their families by providing mentoring, vocational skills, education, and relationships they need to bridge the gap from addiction to productive community and family life. We accomplish this through a twelve month residential program in Buckingham County and a six month program in Charlottesville at our Intern House.

Ruling year info

2014

Founder and Executive Director

Mr. William Washington

Main address

PO Box 2402

Charlottesville, VA 22902 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-1820614

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Rehabilitation Services for Offenders (I40)

Employment Training (J22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Bridge works in Central Virginia to transform the lives of troubled men and their families by providing mentoring, vocational skills, education, and the relationships they need to bridge the gap from addiction to productive community and family life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Phase 2: Buckingham Campus

The Bridge operates a retreat center in Buckingham County that can accommodate 45 men who struggle with life-controlling issues. During the eighteen-month program, men receive character building instruction, job training, drug counseling and teaching on practical Bible application. The schedule is highly structured and teaches the students important life skills they need to live a productive life.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Men and boys

A select few of our students, who successfully complete 12 months of the program at our Buckingham facility, are offered the privilege of moving into our Charlottesville Intern House for the last six months of the program. There, the men develop ties with the local community, attend church, find employment, and receive further training in practical life skills.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Men and boys

The Bridge Ministry has working relationships with correctional facilities across the country and also works with judges to provide an alternative to incarceration. Because of these relationships, The Bridge Ministry is able to prepare men to enter into our program.

Population(s) Served
Substance abusers
Men and boys

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Success rate for students who complete at least 12 of the 18 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Adults

Related Program

Phase 2: Buckingham Campus

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Job placement rate for graduates of the Intern House phase of the program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Adults

Related Program

Phase 3: Intern House

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The program addresses many needs in our community. Drug abuse both nationally and locally is a major problem when it comes to public safety and the burden it places on our health care system. There is a local and national heroin and opioid epidemic, as well as the rise of the use of meth-amphetamines, the use of cocaine, and the abuse of prescription medication. In recent crime statistics in the city of Charlottesville, in a population of 45,593, 1 in 28 will be the victim of a crime. There have been 204 burglaries, and 1,313 instances of theft, and 90 motor vehicle thefts (neighborhoodscout.com). The vast majority of these instances of theft and larceny can be directly correlated to substance abuse. In Albemarle County, in 2015 there were only 80 crimes committed against people, but there were 1,324 crimes involving theft, breaking and entering, larceny or stolen vehicles (2015 Albemarle County Police Annual Report). Drug and alcohol abuse continue to endanger the safety of our community and the Bridge Ministry Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Program directly addresses it by preventing habitual offenses, proven by the success rate of 76% after graduation. The Bridge is not just a program based in substance abuse counseling, but in behavioral modification. In the local Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail, over 60% of the inmates are being held on drug offenses.

Our program also addresses the issue of homelessness and the indigent population in our community. Out of the 45,593 residents of Charlottesville, nearly 27% live below the poverty line. The majority of the individuals we serve are homeless and have no financial resources whatsoever because those resources have been exhausted through destructive behaviors involving substance abuse. The program also addresses single parent families and one income households that are contributing to lower socioeconomic circumstances for children in our community growing up without their fathers who are incarcerated. In a recent study by the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, more than 60% of children in single parent families in the City of Charlottesville live on or near the poverty line while only 20% of children in married families live on or near the poverty line. Not only do we provide individual counseling, but also counseling that involves the entire family. We also teach students financial literacy and workplace readiness skills that make them more employable.

The strategies we use are broken down into three six month phases. We base these phases on a multi-step recovery program in which participants have more than an 80% improvement on both family relationships and social connections (Narcotics Anonymous Membership Survey). In Phase One, our students begin the very difficult process of admission and acceptance of responsibility for their destructive and addictive behavior. As in most 12 step modalities, the first step is the acknowledgement of responsibility by the individual. Our daily group counseling sessions help students to identify known criminal associations and environments. Our staff then begins to help the students draw connections between their detrimental affiliations, thought patterns, and decisions. What is unique about our Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Program is that it can be customized to fit the needs of each of our students as our staff conducts consistent evaluations through classes, structure, and discipline. These goals are achieved through a diverse group of counselors and classes that are conducted both in the morning and the evening. Through a structured curriculum of self-evaluation and learning positive behaviors through group discussions, students learn positive strategies to identify the destructive affiliations and behavior patterns they have engaged in and its effects on them and their families. This aggressive mental and emotional counseling must be accompanied by vocational training as well as recreational activity to give students the balance they need as they identify their destructive patterns.

In the next six months, which is Phase Two of the program, students become the example of what they have learned. The repetitive structure brings mental stability, which ultimately helps the students to not only identify their known criminal affiliations, but then to identify the emotional triggers connected to their substance abuse. This is also the phase where the family becomes more involved in the overall process. Students are permitted to see them on a regular basis and the staff is there to help the re-integration process of our students with their families. During that time, our students learn how to take the initial training and mental reconditioning to deal with unresolved emotional trauma.

In Phase Three of the program, students are able to live in the Intern House in Charlottesville where they must maintain employment, are able to start paying their fines and restitutions, and are able to begin the process of entering back into the community while still under the supervision of the Bridge.

The Bridge Ministry, Inc. was founded informally in the home of William Washington twenty four years ago and began operating as a 501(c)(3) organization in December 1996. Besides other honors, Bridge Ministry Founder and Executive Director William Washington was the recipient of a 2006 Bridge Builders Award, which recognizes the contributions of citizens “who succeeded in building bridges in our community." He was the youngest recipient to date. Mr. Washington was also chosen as a Distinguished Dozen in 2004 by the Daily Progress, a local newspaper that recognizes twelve people each year who are leaders in the community. He has also written two books, His Grace is Sufficient: An Autobiography and People, Places, & Things: A Guide to Overcoming Addictive Behavior. He wrote these two books to share his testimony and help others understand how to break free from the addictive behavior.

An informal survey conducted in 2010 showed that 76% of the men who had stayed for at least twelve months of the eighteen month program were living productive lives in their communities. The Bridge also has a 100% job placement rate for graduates of the second phase of the program. The Bridge is currently expanding the educational and vocational training as well as providing more one-on-one counseling for the students to help increase the overall success rate. In the coming year, the Bridge plans to work with more than 50 men and their families.

Financials

Bridge Ministry, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Bridge Ministry, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 4/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jay James

Joyce Washington

The Bridge Ministry

William Washington

The Bridge Ministry

Elbert Brown

Troy Schrank

Jay James

The Bridge Ministry

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data