Animal related

INTERNATIONAL ANIMAL RESCUE US

Saving animals from suffering around the world

aka IAR

Shrewsbury, MA

Mission

Our mission is to build awareness and implement effective systems such that habitats and animals are protected. At International Animal Rescue we not only save animals from suffering, we also rehabilitate and release them back into the wild and work to protect their precious natural habitats. Our aim is to return animals to their natural environment wherever possible, but we also provide a permanent home for those that can no longer fend for themselves. As human populations expand, wildlife comes under increasing threat. By rescuing individual animals belonging to species like the orangutan and reintroducing them into protected areas in the wild, our work also plays a role in the conservation of the species as a whole.

Ruling Year

2002

Principal Officer

Alan Knight OBE

Main Address

PO Box 137

Shrewsbury, MA 01545 USA

Keywords

Orangutan, Primates, Bears, Birds, Dogs, Cats, Spay, Neuter, Conservation, Animal, Welfare

EIN

54-2044674

 Number

3985408532

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

Protection of Endangered Species (D31)

IRS Filing Requirement

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Orangutan Rescue: The plight of the orangutan in Indonesia has reached a critical stage, with the survival of the species under serious threat. animals are suffering and dying because of the systematic destruction of the rainforest. Armenian Bear Rescue: aims to free the 80 brown bears that are being used as tourist attractions in restaurants and bus depots across the country. Dancing Bear Rescue: The cruel practice of dancing bears was made illegal in India in 1972. However, in the decades that followed sloth bears were still caught from the wild and beaten and mutilated to force them to dance. Our goal is to end the dancing bear trade and provide them sanctuary. Slow Loris Rescue: The slow loris in Indonesia is in serious danger of extinction and the greatest threat to its survival is the illegal trade in wildlife. Howler Monkey Rescue: Every year hundreds of howler monkeys and other wild animals in Costa Rica are electrocuted on un-insulated power lines.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Orangutan Rescue and Rehabilitation, Borneo

Armenia Bear Rescue

Dancing Bear Rescue

Slow Loris Rescue

Howler Monkey Rescue

Macaque Rescue

Cat Rescue

Malta Bird Rescue

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of animals rescued

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Armenia Bear Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Since the start of The Great Bear Rescue, 24 bears have been rescued.

Number of animals with freedom to express normal behavior

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Dancing Bear Rescue

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context notes

We currently have 300 bears in our care and NO more bears have been poached.

Number of animals rehabilitated

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Orangutan Rescue and Rehabilitation, Borneo

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context notes

Number of orangutans rescued and rehabilitated at IAR center each year. These numbers are largely affected by the wild fires.

Number of captive animals released

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

General/Unspecified

Related program

Orangutan Rescue and Rehabilitation, Borneo

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Numbers of orangutans that were released back to the wild. These numbers will be dependent on whether these animals were wild (removed from farm lands) or confiscated babies which need years of rehab.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Orangutan Rescue: IAR's team is working in West Kalimantan to rescue and care for baby orangutans that have been taken from their mothers to be illegally sold as pets and adults that have spent their entire lives in captivity, chained up or imprisoned in tiny cages. Our human-orangutan conflict team also comes to the aid of orangutans left stranded when their forest home is destroyed and translocates these vulnerable animals to safe areas of protected forest. Any animals that can no longer survive in the wild will be given a permanent home at the center. We are committed to rescuing and rehabilitating as many orangutans as we can and giving them a second chance to live safely in their natural environment. Armenian Bear Rescue: In October 2017 IAR launched a new campaign to help suffering bears. The Great Bear Rescue aims to rescue 80 bears and, after thorough veterinary checks and assessment, rehabilitate and eventually release those that are physically and mentally equipped to fend for themselves in the wild. Those that are not viable for release will be given a permanent home in sanctuaries where they will be well cared for, well fed and have the freedom to express natural bear behavior. Dancing Bear Rescue: In 2002 we helped our partners Wildlife SOS complete the construction of the Agra bear sanctuary. From then on the project went from strength to strength, becoming so successful that by the end of 2009 we had rescued all the dancing bears from the streets of India. The majority are housed in Agra, others at a second sanctuary in Bannerghatta near Bangalore in the south and a small number at a third center in Bhopal, central India. The sanctuaries in India currently care for 300 bears where we provide a lasting home for them to live out their days in peace. We will continue to provide each bear with exceptional veterinary care, nutritious food and environmental enrichment while continuing to monitor to be sure no more bears are poached from the wild. Slow Loris Rescue: Thousands of slow lorises are poached from the wild and illegally sold on the street or in animal markets. The slow lorises' teeth are clipped off by the traders to make them easier to handle, resulting in the death of many of them from blood loss or infection before they are sold. Our goal is to return as many slow lorises to the wild as possible. However, many of them have had their teeth cut out and may no longer be able to fend for themselves. Veterinary dental specialists are helping us determine whether these teeth can be repaired or replaced. We provide a permanent home at our center for lorises that can never be released. Howler Monkey Rescue: In January 2017 we announced our commitment to support Refuge for Wildlife in Nosara, Costa Rica by contributing funds and raising awareness of its vital work. The Refuge shares IAR’s commitment to the rescue, rehabilitation and release of injured, displaced and orphaned wildlife.

We work with other like-minded organizations and government departments to develop sound legislation to protect animals from cruelty and neglect. In all that we do, we aim to produce practical solutions that benefit both animals and people. We also work closely with local authorities and the police to catch wildlife traffickers and dealers and bring them to court. Education of local communities and better law enforcement are vital if endangered primates are to stand a chance of survival.

We work closely with local NGOs, government bodies and forestry departments to effectively end the illegal trade in animals. While we do provide sanctuary to animals that can no longer survive on their own in the wild, we work to enact laws that will keep more animals from suffering in the future. Working closely with universities and scientists, we are also carrying out research into successful rehabilitation and reintroduction programs for slow lorises. A good number of lorises with their teeth intact have been released wearing radio collars and are being closely monitored by the team. We also work closely with local authorities and the police to catch wildlife traffickers and dealers and bring them to court. Education of local communities and better law enforcement are vital if this endangered primate is to stand a chance of survival.

Orangutan Rescue: We expect to see a decrease in human-orangutan conflict and less orangutans needing rescue. After release, we hope to see a healthy population rebuild in the wild. Armenian Bear Rescue: We have rescued 24 bears and have about 60 more to rescue. We need to build expand the sanctuary and build enclosures in order to accommodate more bears. Dancing Bear Rescue: We will work on the poaching level to be sure that no more bears are taken from the wild. After starting a rehabilitation program for the people which provides them with an alternative livelihood, we have yet to have a person be found with another bear. Slow Loris Rescue: In 2015, the first wildlife trader was arrested in Indonesia for possession of four slow lorises. This is a huge success, because these laws were never enforced prior to our presence in the area. We aim to release slow lorises back to the wild to create a healthy and stable wild population. Howler Monkey Rescue: laws must be enforces to have new builders properly coat their electrical wires. If builders break this law, there must be held accountable. We will know we are making progress when less howler monkeys are coming into the center for rehabilitation.

1989 IAR founded as a charity and establishes Animal Tracks sanctuary in South West England. 1990 IAR joins the campaign against the indiscriminate slaughter of migratory birds in Malta. 1998 IAR opens a veterinary clinic in Goa to relieve the suffering of local stray dog and cat populations. 1999 IAR head office established in Uckfield, East Sussex. 2002 IAR partners with Wildlife SOS in India to open the Agra Bear Rescue Facility (ABRF) for dancing bears rescued from the streets. 2005 IAR opens a new clinic for stray dogs in Tamil Nadu, India. 2005 IAR opens a second sanctuary for rescued dancing bears in Bannerghatta, in southern India. 2006 IAR joins forces with ProAnimalia to support its work rescuing and rehabilitating primates in Indonesia. ProAnimalia is reconstituted as IAR Indonesia. 2007 IAR's new primate rescue and rehabilitation center is built in Java. 2009 IAR's “Year of the Bear" which aims to end the trade in Indian dancing bears. 2009 IAR signs an agreement with the Forestry Department in Borneo on the rescue, rehabilitation and release of orangutans and the purchase of land to build a rehabilitation center. 2009 Animal welfare history is made as the last dancing bear is rescued in India. 2010 IAR Purchases a 60 acre site in West Kalimantan, Borneo, upon which will be built an orangutan rescue and rehabilitation facility – this will form the core of IAR's orangutan conservation project. 2010 First successful release of the highly endangered slow loris primate in Java by IAR. 2014 Our orangutan rescue center in Indonesia is the first facility in Asia to be accredited by the Global Federation of Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS). Accreditation means that the center meets the comprehensive and rigorous definition of a true sanctuary/rehabilitation center and is providing humane and responsible care to the orangutans. 2015 Forest fires destroy 5000 acres of rain forest surrounding our center in Ketapang and over 5 million nationwide. Over the course of the year our team was involved with 40 orangutan rescues! 2015 International Animal Rescue launched 'Tickling is Torture' to expose the cruelty involved in keeping slow lorises as pets. The campaign would go on to get 700,000 signatures and reach on audience of over 150 million people! 2016 Our team in Indonesia begin an ambitious project to plant 650,000 trees and reforest an area 2017 International Animal Rescue is thrilled to announce our support for Nosara's Refuge for Wildlife to help care for Howler Monkeys in Costa Rica. With our partners, Foundation for the Preservation of Wildlife and Cultural Assets (FPWC), we've launched a campaign to free 80 caged bears which have been found living in shocking conditions. 2018 For the first time ever in Armenia two bears have been released back into the wild where they belong. The two cubs had been rescued as part of our 'Great Bear Rescue' project and have been rehabilitating for the past year at our sanctuary.

External Reviews

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Financials

INTERNATIONAL ANIMAL RESCUE US

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes