PLATINUM2023

Young Audiences of Virginia, Inc

To inspire and engage students IN and THROUGH the arts!

aka Arts for Learning, the Virginia Affiliate of Young Audiences   |   Norfolk, VA   |  www.Arts4LearningVA.org

Learn how to support this organization

Mission

Our mission is to inspire and engage students in and through the arts through culturally rich, student-focused performances, workshops, residencies, and virtual learning led by the professional artists on our roster. Motivated by our belief that the arts are central to a well-rounded education, we provide arts-integrated programs to help pre-K to 12th grade students build academic, creative, and social-emotional skills. We collaborate with artists, educators, and community organizations to connect learning and the arts through programs that foster academic success and develop vibrant communities.

Ruling year info

1966

CEO

Mrs. Christine M. Everly

Main address

420 North Center Drive Suite 239

Norfolk, VA 23502 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Young Audiences Arts for Learning Virginia

EIN

54-6063377

NTEE code info

Arts Education/Schools (A25)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

1. In the educational community, Arts for Learning enriches academic learning and helps develop social, emotional, and cultural competencies among children and educators. 2. In the arts community, Arts for Learning encourages the appreciation for and engagement in the arts as an essential part of a meaningful and fulfilling life. A4L creates and advocates for opportunities for artist employment, networking/collaboration, and professional development. 3. In the local community, Arts for Learning increases community engagement in the arts. Through our services, we promote beneficial community values of inclusivity, social justice, equality, and respect for diversity.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Curriculum Plus

Our signature program, Curriculum Plus, provides high quality artistic performances and workshopsfor students in pre-K through 12th grade with the goal of inspiring and engaging the critical and creative thinking skills needed for academic and social success. Arts for Learning's arts-integrated curriculum reinforces what students learn in their regular classroom and exposes students to a wide variety of artistic mediums. Educational performances by our artists are aligned with Virginia’s Standards of Learning and presented in-person and via videos. In addition to programs taking place in school settings, our artists perform at public libraries, community centers, and festivals throughout Virginia.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

In partnership with Families of Autistic Children in Tidewater (FACT), this inclusive residency teaches dance, music, and visual arts to middle and high school students with autism. The program is designed for students to join with their peers and learn new skills in a supportive environment.

Testimonial: “My son is 13 years old, and I can’t tell you how many events, classes, camps. Workshops, schools, and more that we have signed up for that have backfired on us. Last night he attended the arts dance/movement program. When we came to pick him up, I was preparing myself for what has become the norm for us. Some type of issue—either from him or the program… This is what my son told me as soon as we were in the car: ‘I liked it. It was fun. Honestly, I went in expecting the worst, but I ended up getting the best.’ I can’t tell you what those simple words meant to me. Well, yes, I can. It meant the world!” Kara Rothman-Reighard, mother of Jesse

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Adolescents

These bilingual art activity kits feature original curriculum that include the supplies students need to complete a hands-on visual arts project at home or in classroom settings.
1. "Tessellations" was created to help third-graders prepare for standardized testing, providing them a creative, hands-on way to reinforce key math concepts such as measuring area and perimeter.
2. "Mini-comics" guide students in how to write and draw their own comic adventures as they invent characters, plots, and settings.
3. "Zen of 'Za" was custom designed for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder but is also suitable for younger elementary students. Project activities include students stretching in yoga-like poses to “make a pizza” and constructing a decorative “pizza” out of the art materials supplied.
All kits include instructions in English and Spanish for ESL learners.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Low-income people

This after-school residency teaches the violin to elementary students in underserved schools. The program has run for many years at multiple Title 1 schools in Portsmouth. During the residency, students learn the basics of how to play the violin, with no need to purchase or rent an instrument, and with no cost to them or their families. At the end of the residency, students play a special violin concert for families and friends.

Population(s) Served
Children
Low-income people

Professionally recorded and edited versions of our artists' programs that come complete with grade-specific curriculum guides that students and teachers can access directly through their schools' learning portals.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Students

Intentional Designs of Expression in Artistic Languages (IDEAL) is a three-year, after-school residency that began in spring 2023. In spring 2024, upper elementary students at Title 1 schools in Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Virginia Beach will explore themes of self-identity, collaboration, and community. Through dance, written and spoken poetry, music, and visual arts, students will create multiple mixed media works of art. The program’s highlight is a collaborative art exhibit of student work from all three schools, hosted by the Chrysler Museum and displayed in their gallery for a month. The Richmond Ballet will present in-school performances and introduce residency students to the technical elements of movement.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Preteens
Adolescents
Children
Preteens

Where we work

Awards

ArtStars Award 2021

Dominion Energy

Affiliations & memberships

Young Audiences, Inc. 1965

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Hours of expertise provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Students, People with disabilities, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Now in its 69th year, Young Audiences of Virginia, doing business as Arts for Learning, is an independent chapter of Young Audiences, the nation’s leading arts-in-education nonprofit organization.

Total number of performances

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Students, Teachers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number includes performances, workshops, residencies, and professional development offered.

Total number of audience members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Adults, Students, Teachers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We continued to be impacted by the pandemic as many schools restricted access to our artists on-site and chose not to offer large performance-assemblies. We expanded virtual offerings in response.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Arts for Learning's keys to success:
1. Provide artistically excellent programs, expertise, and resources:
A. Engage quality artists and offer services that are artistically significant.
B. Focus on reaching under-represented or historically marginalized populations.
C. Develop professional learning opportunities and practical strategies for artists centered on planning,
preparation, instruction, and artistry.
D. Close the financial gap between what schools and community partners can afford and what artists need to
earn.
2. Integrate the arts into learning and inclusive communities through:
A. Performances that connect the arts to children through holistic educational learning while fostering
understanding and appreciation of both the artist and diverse art forms.
B. In-depth workshop programs such as residencies that encourage children to demonstrate and practice
imaginative problem-solving, self-expression and the ability to see from expanded perspectives.
C. Hands-on, self-directed interactive art kits that encourage creative development and learning exploration.
D. Professional development that encourages educators in all subject areas to use the arts as innovative
teaching tools to create and sustain enthusiasm for learning.

Develop partnerships with schools, community venues, and other cultural organizations to bring artists directly to the students both during and after school hours.

Engage professional artists of every performing, visual, or literary art discipline and develop with them interactive, high-quality curriculum based upon academic or social-emotional learning needs expressed by educators.

Identify sources of funding to address the gap between what schools or community venues can afford and what an artist needs to earn.

Experienced staff with a track record of successful development and delivery of innovative programming.

Assessment of artistic quality and program impact.

Engaged board of directors with a diverse set of experience to assist staff with making contacts with partners and funders.

Coastal Virginia has our biggest concentration of service hours and the largest number of students, families, and educators reached. The virtual arts experiences we developed during the pandemic have allowed us to reach students in a broader geographical area.

We have added new, culturally diverse, and artistically excellent teaching and performing artists, thanks to renewed outreach by our Artist and Programming Manager; a new Emerging Teaching Artists program for student artists; and participation in Common Casting Calls in Virginia Beach. We have created grade-specific curriculum guides for many of our programs, and we are actively engaging in professional development opportunities for our artists to raise the quality of their performances and teaching. Our new affiliation as Coastal Virginia Wolf Trap presents an important new way to engage with our youngest learners, with selected artists on our roster being trained in research-based methods to share with classroom teachers.

During the the past few years, we have successfully developed new partnerships with other nonprofit organizations, including Families of Autistic Children in Tidewater and the Virginia African American Cultural Center; we will continue to cultivate new and expanded partnerships among community organizations and nonprofits. We have also achieved success in identifying new funding sources to support our organization.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

Young Audiences of Virginia, Inc
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Young Audiences of Virginia, Inc

Board of directors
as of 10/02/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. D. Michael Geller

Retired physician/photographer

Term: 2023 - 2025

Minette Cooper

Arts advocate

Kate Roth

Senior VP of Accounting & Financial Reporting, TowneBank

Melissa Roomsburg

Senior VP of Business Development and Client Services, PRA Group

Rae Pearson Benn

Director of Communications, Regent University

Linda Dennis

Retired Music Educator, Professional Musician

Carlton P. Hardy

Arts Advocate, Retired Army Training Specialist

Judy Gutterman

Retired counselor, arts Advocate

Erica Mitchell

Director of Content Strategy, EOS Surfaces

Dr. Vanessa Thaxton-Ward

Director, Hampton University Museum

Philip (Phil) P. Smith, Jr.

Senior VP, TowneBank, Chesapeake

La-Neka Brown

Director of Teacher in Residence program, Old Dominion University

David Snouffer

Willcox & Savage attorney

Becky Livas

Arts advocate, singer, retired educator

Malcolm Terrell

Financial Professional, First Financial Group

Beth Hazelette

Retired music educator

Claire Bellecci

CEO, Mellon Street Creative

Ebony J. Carter

HR-HRBP Manager, Sentara Enterprises

Joan L. Rhodes-Copeland

Arts advocate

Kristine A. Pierce

Human Resources Director, Fishing Point Healthcare

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/26/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/09/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.