Junior Achievement of the Triad

Financial Literacy, Work Readiness, Entrepreneurship

Greensboro, NC   |  www.triadja.org

Mission

Our mission is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in a global economy. Junior Achievement of the Triad is dedicated to addressing fundamental social and economic challenges of young people by educating and empowering them to transform their future and own their economic success. Through the delivery of cutting-edge, experiential learning in financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship, Junior Achievement programs effectively broaden the canvas of possibility for young people and enrich their ability to transform their futures and contribute to the strength of their families, communities and economies.

Ruling year info

1994

President and CEO

Guy Harrington

Main address

3220 Northline Ave

Greensboro, NC 27408 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-0844838

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (B01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Junior Achievement of the Triad is dedicated to addressing fundamental social and economic challenges of young people by educating and empowering them to transform their future and own their economic success. Through the delivery of cutting-edge, experiential learning in financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship, Junior Achievement programs effectively broaden the canvas of possibility for young people and enrich their ability to engage in their own economic development and contribute to the strength of their families, communities and economies. With a six county territory, Junior Achievement of the Triad’s network is annually powered by over 650 volunteers and mentors from all sectors of society, reaching thousands of North Carolina students in Forsyth, Guilford, Montgomery, Randolph and Rockingham counties.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Junior Achievement Programming school systems

Our Career Preparation project is a comprehensive approach to reaching public elementary, middle, and high school students in the Triad region of North Carolina. Around 73% of the students we serve (Guilford, Forsyth, Rockingham, Randolph Counties) are eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunch and 61% are students of color. JA learning experiences equip young people with the tools to make better financial and career decisions to interrupt the cycle of poverty. PROGRAM 1) Our comprehensive, curriculum kit-based programs provide a foundation for understanding money, how the economy works, the basics of entrepreneurship, and the education needed for different careers. PROGRAM 2) The JA Inspire Virtual Career Fair for middle and high school students is a flexible platform for students to explore 16 different career clusters. PROGRAM 3) The JA Career Speaker Series Series introduces a guest speaker to the classroom, enabling them to share info about their career, work, and education.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adolescents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Junior Achievement Programming school systems

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of students JA of the Triad was able to serve was drastically impacted by school system Covid policies as well as volunteer policies that local companies had in place due to Covid.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Junior Achievement of the Triad opened in 1965 with the help of nearly three dozen local business leaders who saw the need for businesses and schools to partner to better prepare students to be active citizens and workforce members. In the early 1970s, Junior Achievement debuted its first in-school program, Project Business, taught by volunteers. The popularity of Project Business was tremendous and demand for new programs was overwhelming! Junior Achievement had the vision that all children deserved, and could understand, economic education programming at all grade levels. Today, Junior Achievement offers programs – in the core content areas of work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy – for students in kindergarten through twelfth grade seeking to prepare them to succeed in a global economy.

Junior Achievement of the Triad is developing strategic plans with local school systems to provide curriculum kit-based programs to K-5th grade students, the JA Inspire virtual career fair for middle and high school students, and the JA Career Speaker series for K-12th grade students. Partnerships are established with local businesses and curriculum is delivered by business volunteers from across community partnerships. Junior Achievement’s program. Our professionally designed, rigorously evaluated, comprehensive and relevant curriculum, developed in partnership with educators and endorsed by superintendents, reinforces and supplements North Carolina’s Common Core Standards and Social Studies Essential Standards.
All Junior Achievement programs are delivered by trained corporate and community volunteers who share their skills and personal and professional experiences to make learning come to life. Our financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and work readiness programs are typically presented by Junior Achievement’s volunteers for 30-45 minutes each week for five to seven weeks, with the exact time commitments dependent upon the grade level of the students. JA works with hundreds of volunteers to provide our life-changing educational experiences to more than 10,000 students each year.

As a local chapter of a National Network, Junior Achievement has access to national support for programming growth. With a growing and active board of directors, representing financial and community organizations from across the community, Junior Achievement's educational, financial and corporate partnerships are opening doors for program expansion.

JA Alumni are well-positioned to:

-Attain higher levels of education – 93% high school, 42% four-year degree, 20% advanced degree; compared to US population at 88%, 32% and 12%;
-Earn 20% higher income – $62,500 compared to the general US population at $51,939;
-Achieve greater career satisfaction – 88% as compared to the general US population at 49%;
-Incur less debt and pay any debt in a quarter of the time as the general US population;
-Are 2 ½ times more likely to start a business

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

Junior Achievement of the Triad
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Junior Achievement of the Triad

Board of directors
as of 08/07/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Steve Swetoha

Greensboro Swarm

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/7/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/07/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.