Curamericas Global

Hope Through Health

aka Curamericas Global, Inc.   |   Raleigh, NC   |  http://www.curamericas.org

Mission

Curamericas Global partners with underserved communities to make measurable and sustainable improvements in their health and wellbeing. Our projects serve communities and community-based organiations with limited access to health care in the United States, Guatemala, Liberia, Haiti, Bolivia, and Kenya.

Ruling year info

1984

Executive Director

Mr. Andrew Herrera

Main address

318 W. Millbrook Rd. Suite 109

Raleigh, NC 27609 USA

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Formerly known as

Andean Rural Health Care

Curamericas

EIN

56-1400098

NTEE code info

Public Health Program (E70)

Nonprofit Management (S50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Liberia - Nehnwaa Child Survival Project

The Nehnwaa Child Survival Project is in its sustainability phase in collaboration with the Ganta United Methodist Hospital in Nimba County, Liberia.  The project had incredible results, saving lives of moms and babies! Our work was through community-based programs that address the principal causes of death among mothers and children – obstetric complications, neonatal conditions, malaria, pneumonia, diarrhea, measles, and HIV infection.  As in all our programs, we use the census-based, impact-oriented (CBIO) approach that has been one of the keys to our success over the years. CBIO ensures that we reach everyone in the program area and that we address the leading causes of death there.

In 2021, our partners aimed to increase access to quality health services in case of emergency in eight (8) communities around Ganta United Methodist Hospital using an evidence based methodology.

One key activity was a workshop training midwives in all communities to better serve their mothers.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Women and girls

We serve as technical advisors and public health managers to our partners HOM and MICECC in Port-au-Prince. This project incorporates training of trainers, intense data collection and mapping of communities to implement preventative community health for mothers and children.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

Today there are seven Casa Materna's or community Birthing centers serving a population of 30,000+ people. Our work is through Community Health Workers, Care Groups (training of trainers) and respectful, quality 24/7 care. We generate demand for health, knowledge of how to stay healthy and what are danger signs and provide supply of quality health services for often left-out indigenous groups in the highlands of Guatemala. We have continued to partner with our outstanding colleagues in the mountains of Guatemala since the completion of this successful project.  Dr. Mario Valdez and his team welcome volunteers from the US who work with community members to help them meet the Sustainable Development Goals and to strengthen their local health care system. 

In 2019, about 65% of all funds spent on the project were generated locally, within Guatemala. In 2021, it was 85%. Our goal is 100% sustainability. After that is achieved we will continue to be in partnership to meet other needs.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Women and girls

For more than 30 years, Curamericas has been working with its partner in Bolivia known as CSRA (Andean Rural Health Care).  CSRA provides primary health care and community-based services in the peri-urban areas of La Paz and Montero.  Dr. Dardo Chavez, who leads the project in Montero, established the nationally recognized model primary health care program that receives visitors from throughout Bolivia and beyond. CSRA’s programs are a model for the new Bolivian national health care policy called SAFCI (Intercultural Family and Community Health). Curamericas Global continues to send volunteers (http://www.curamericas.org/getinvolved/volunteers/index.html) to provide a helping hand in their work.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Children and youth

During the COVID Pandemic, Community Health Workers have reached over 200,000 people across North Carolina through front-line community-based organizations. We have served as a convener and trainer to invest in committed experts from communities rather than parachuting in and bringing in outsiders or a call-center.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants and migrants
People of Latin American descent

Curamericas Global is lean and nimble: we channel our resources into building local capacity in the countries where we work. Our proprietary Community-Based Impact-Oriented (CBIO) Methodology empowers communities and local NGOs to bring life-saving services and education to every doorstep, enlists community members in improving their own health, and by methodically tracking all births and deaths, has the unique ability to demonstrate actual impact in reducing maternal and child mortality. (497)

Organization Achievements
What was the most important thing your organization achieved in the past year? (250)

In Kitutu Chache, an impoverished rural region of southwest Kenya, population 49,000, we successfully launched the KIKOP Project in partnership with the Ministry of Health to reduce very high maternal and neonatal mortality and teen pregnancy. 243

Problem Summary
What specific challenge, problem, or question will your intervention help resolve? (500)

Teen pregnancy in Kenya carries huge risks of poverty, stunting, and maternal/neonatal mortality. In our project region, 23% of adolescent girls get pregnant and 75% of pregnancies are unwanted. Reducing teen pregnancy requires holistic approaches that include effective reproductive health education. But the purely fact-based education taught in Kenya is not changing teen behavior due to characteristic adolescent cognitive and emotional immaturity which impedes responsible decision-making.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Infants and toddlers

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of entities served by expertise

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In-country partners around the world ensure sustainable change. Partners must include the local ministry of health, community organizations and anyone else with a stake in their community health.

Number of health education trainings conducted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Training to local partners, governments, & women's groups are at the core of what we do. Training is sustainable and topics include the priorities of the partner related to health for women & babies.

Number of sexually active females receiving reproductive health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Family planning is the best way to save the lives of women during childbirth. 216 Million women around the world want to plan their pregnancy but cannot.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Curamericas Global partners with underserved communities to make measurable and sustainable improvements in their health and wellbeing. For over thirty years, Curamericas has worked in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa to alleviate suffering from treatable and preventable causes. Curamericas Global’s past and current projects in Guatemala, Haiti, and Liberia have served communities with some of the highest child and maternal mortality rates in the world, confronting conditions that include malnutrition, pneumonia, malaria, and complications from child birth. Curamericas believes passionately in the community and family foundations of health. Curamericas’ projects build the capacity of communities and families to improve their own health. Therefore, Curamericas’ projects always empower women and girls, recognizing that a mother is the child’s first doctor, and the surest predictor of a child’s health is the education level of his/her mother.
Four guiding principles drive Curamericas Global’s work: 1) we rigorously measure the effectiveness of our work; 2) we ensure that health care services are equitably provided to those most in need; 3) we empower communities, families, and women to improve their own health; and 4) we create sustainable programs. We partner with local organizations in order to foster community ownership and local capacity. In short, we are committed to evidence-based interventions and measurable outcomes, implemented with the utmost respect, compassion, and integrity.

Curamericas Global utilizes community-based education and prevention interventions in order to address different health problems relating to maternal and child health in underserved communities in Latin America and West Africa, and delivers these strategies using Curamericas’ Community-Based, Impact-Oriented (CBIO) model in combination with the Care Group and Positive Deviance methodologies.

The CBIO approach involves: (a) Community mobilization to cement good relations and secure community buy-in and ownership; (b) Conducting a census and health assessment of each community; (c) drawing maps, enumerating households, and creating a Community Register of every beneficiary by household; (d) establishing Community Health Committees (CHCs) and helping the CHCs develop a Community Diagnosis describing the community’s health challenges and a Community Health Plan describing how the project and the community will work based on both epidemiologically-driven health objectives and community perceived health priorities; (e) using the Community Registers to monitor coverage of key services to ensure equitable services to all and that those most in need are served; (f) methodically locating and making targeted home visits through Routine Home Visitation (RHV) to those most in need; and (g) utilizing a continuous health surveillance system that allows staff to tailor service delivery and engage in continuous quality improvement. This involves the capturing of vital events – new pregnancies, births, and deaths - that give us the unique capacity to track and detect actual project impact and measure changes in maternal and child mortality rather than a sample.
The Care Group methodology involves recruiting and training mother peer educators called Care Group Volunteers. Each Care Group Volunteer is assigned eight to twelve neighboring households and brings to these households, via group meetings or home visitation, life-saving Behavior Change Communication (BCC) delivered in the local language and utilizing proven methods of adult education for non- or semi-literate audiences. Subjects covered include, but are not limited to the importance of antenatal and post-partum care and health facility deliveries; recognizing and responding to danger signs in pregnancy, delivery, and post-partum; prevention and care-seeking for malaria, diarrhea, and pneumonia; and proper nutrition for pregnant women and children, as well as immunization adherence. In this manner, health education penetrates to every household. In addition, the CGVs are the project’s “eyes and ears” and report to project staff vital events so field staff can respond with timely services and to enable the unique surveillance capability described above.
The Positive Deviance model identifies healthy children (“positive deviants”). The mothers of these children are then interviewed in order to find out how better health was achieved, and thereby what locally available and affordable foods can be used.

Curamericas’ programs consist of In-Country Staff that support Headquarters initiatives in the host country to follow out project goals. Staff consists of project coordinators, monitoring and evaluating officers, accountants, community support supervisors and communication officers, and other various health officers (HIV, WASH). Projects also heavily rely on Care Groups and Community Health Volunteers to spread important behavioral change messages and make sure community members are active within the programs.

Curamericas has successfully reduced maternal and child mortality throughout Curamericas’ various projects, but we always strive to reach more people and improve the strategies we use and outcomes we get. Curamericas hopes to continue to expand into new partnerships with communities around the world to save the lives of mothers and children.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Front-line public health and social services organizatoins.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Our strategic plan included 100% participation by our international partners including through one on one key informant interviews. With this feedback we were able to determine how much effort would be focused across specific geographies.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome,

Financials

Curamericas Global
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Curamericas Global

Board of directors
as of 3/31/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Michelle Richter

Henry Perry

Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health

Andrew Herrera

Curamericas Global, Inc.

Nathan Robison

Andean Rural Health

Michelle Richter

BioAgilytix

Tina Jones

Jordan Jones

UNC-CH School of Government

Stacie Arechevala

Stanford Biodesign Innovation Fellow

Lauren Eberly

Clinical Fellow, Cardiovascular Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine

Amy McCullough

Lead Pastor at Grace United Methodist Church

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/31/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/11/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.