North Carolina Wildlife Federation

Protecting, conserving and restoring North Carolina wildlife and habitat since 1945.

aka South Wake Conservationists EIN 46-5339262   |   Raleigh, NC   |  www.ncwf.org

Mission

Our mission is to protect, conserve and restore North Carolina wildlife and habitat. Our vision is a North Carolina with bountiful and diverse wildlife - including all species of wild flora and fauna – that is valued by its citizens and elected officials and sustainably managed for future generations. How do we achieve this for our wildlife and wild places? We use the best available science, stay out of party politics, and invest our resources wisely in our own ‘backyard’ - North Carolina; With the help of our scientists, agency and corporate partners, chapters, and individual donors; We build collaborations and programs that break loose needed change. Since 1945, NCWF has provided substantial and effective leadership in all areas of wildlife conservation. Visit us at www.ncwf.org

Ruling year info

2010

CEO

Mr. Tim Gestwicki

Main address

1024 Washington Street

Raleigh, NC 27605 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-1564376

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

North Carolina has among the most bountiful and diverse natural resources of any state, and a long history of appreciating and conserving those resources, while using them productively for the good of its current and future citizens. However, we live in challenging times and numerous threats to our wildlife and wild places are clear. For example: • Loss of critical habitat: each year NC looses 105,000 acres to rapid population growth; • Unsustainable exploitation: each year, giant shrimp trawlers harvest 6,000,000 pounds of shrimp from our estuaries, yet in the process kill and discard over 24,000,000 pounds of juvenile nursery fish or by-catch - devastating our fisheries. • Climate change and species decline: recent nationwide studies show up to 40% reductions in populations of honey bees, monarch butterflies and other key pollinator species, threatening North Carolina’s crop production and agricultural economy. Learn about challenges our wildlife and wild places face at ncwf.org

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

About our work

From the Great Smoky Mountains to the Outer Banks, our organization is made up of people who value wildlife and wild places and the many ways to enjoy them. We work collectively for the places and species that have no voice through our policy and protection work, research and education and direct hands-on conservation projects.

We know that making large scale, systemic changes that protect our wildlife and wild places takes patience, time, and perseverance. Hallmarks of our work include discerning, and then keeping in front of us clear, science-based understandings of what systemic changes are needed. We then build coalitions and partnerships and programs and campaigns that target existing underlying blocks to those needed systemic changes.

We pride ourselves on not re-inventing the wheel or going it alone, but in pushing together at points in the system that have a good chance of breaking loose needed change.
Learn more about our work below or visit www.ncwf.org

Population(s) Served
Adults

We recognize the importance of both commercial and recreational fishing, but today’s practices are unsustainable. Without much better stewardship, NC’s marine resources will deplete until there’s nothing left for anyone.
NCWF’s statewide Sound Solutions Campaign aims to sustain North Carolina’s marine resources by reforming how our fisheries are managed and by addressing destructive fishing gear, unsustainable harvest levels, and weak habitat protections.
Sound Solutions is working at the state, regional and local levels, using legal maneuvers, legislative remedies, agency rule making procedures, grass roots organizing, marketing and publicity, and coalition building.
NCWF has a balanced, science-based, SOUND approach to the challenges facing our sounds, and we invite you to learn more and join our efforts at www.ncwf.org/conservation-priorities/sound-solutions

Population(s) Served
Adults

Pollinators such as bumblebees, butterflies, and other insects are critical to maintaining North Carolina’s agricultural economy and biological diversity.
The Butterfly Highway is NCWF’s statewide initiative that aims to restore native pollinator habitats to areas impacted by urbanization, land use change and agriculture across North Carolina.
From backyard Pollinator Pitstops to solar farms and utility company rights-of-ways to large-scale roadside habitat restoration, this project is creating a network of native flowering plants to sustain butterflies, bees, birds and other pollen and nectar dependent wildlife. To date, we have collaborated with utility companies, land trusts, and public and private landowners to protect over 30,000 acres of pollinator habitat.
In 2017, NCWF helped form the NC Pollinator Conservation Alliance. We co-chair this coalition of 28 NC-based partner organizations, agencies, universities, and companies. Our goal is to coordinate the work these groups have been doing individually so that together we can accomplish landscape-scale habitat restoration for pollinators.
Learn more at: http://ncwf.org/programs/garden-for-wildlife/butterfly-highway

Population(s) Served
Adults

Great Outdoors University (GoU) is a conservation-based, experiential education program created by the North Carolina Wildlife Federation and the National Wildlife Federation that brings outdoor adventures to kids ages 6-18 who have limited opportunities to explore the natural world.
For many kids, a GoU experience is the first time they’ve had a chance to connect with the great outdoors – whether it’s exploring a lake by canoe, learning to fish, observing wildlife up close, romping through the woods or mucking about in creeks. Kids learn the importance of conserving special places for wildlife and have the chance to gain new skills, build self-confidence, mentor with positive role models and experience teamwork and hands-on problem solving.
GoU connects over 12,000 kids to nature in profound ways each year and works hand in hand with our 27 partner social service agencies like Boys and Girls Clubs and our 30 destination partners in forests, farms, parks and private lands. We provide all the gear, insurance, transportation, binoculars, dip nets, naturalists and curriculum at no cost to kids or our partner agencies.
Learn more at: http://ncwf.org/programs/great-outdoors-university/

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

NCWF's Deer Program brings together farmers, sportsmen and women, and community groups to sustainably manage white-tailed deer, reduce deer damage to crops, increase local farm and community revenue and provide hunter-harvested venison to local food banks and shelters.

High numbers of deer can contribute to excessive crop loss on farms, the spread of disease within deer populations and deer-vehicle collisions. With assistance from farmers, hunters, hunt clubs, civic organizations, church ministry groups and businesses, the Farmers and Communities Manage Deer Program supports deer management, donates about 13,000 pounds of venison each year to feed the hungry and serves as a model for farmers and communities across the state struggling with an overabundance of deer.
We are currently working many counties across the state. Learn more at www.ncwf.org/programs/farmers-manage-deer

Population(s) Served
Farmers

Unless we begin to protect remaining high quality aquatic habitats and the healthiest native fish populations, we will likely experience an unprecedented series of population declines and species extinctions over the next half-century.
Native Fish Conservation Areas are watersheds where management primarily emphasizes conservation and restoration of native fish and other aquatic species, and their habitats, while also managing compatible recreational and commercial uses.
In 2015 NCWF launched our nation’s first successful Native Fish Conservation Area in the Little Tennessee River Basin. This coalition of 35 state, federal, industry, and local stakeholders is working together to coordinate, prioritize and invest in projects for the greatest long-term conservation of native fish in the Little Tennessee River.
Now beginning its fourth year, this working demonstration is being adopted in other river basins around the region and country. Learn more at: www.ncwf.org/conservation-priorities/little-tennessee-river-native-fish-conservation-area

Population(s) Served
Adults

The ranks of hunters and fishermen in our state number in the millions. The NC Camouflage Coalition is NCWF’s online network of over 200,000 sportsmen and women who monitor and act on issues that affect hunting, fishing and conservation on a local, state and national level.
This Coalition forms an overlying bridge across all sporting groups. Its membership – comprised of hunters and anglers who see themselves as committed and effective voices for conservation – helps protect the sporting heritage by ensuring sound science-based management of our state’s natural resources.
Learn more at: www.ncwf.org/programs/the-north-carolina-camouflage-coalition/

Population(s) Served
Adults

NCWF organizes local voices for conservation into Wildlife Chapters in communities all across NC, and invites everyone to get involved - see if there is one near you, or help start a Wildlife Chapter in your community.
Our Wildlife Chapters serve as a conduit between NCWF and the people of NC helping drive forward NCWF’s statewide initiatives, and, helping local communities harness NCWF’s strengths of education, advocacy, grassroots mobilization, outdoor activities and policy expertise.
Each Wildlife Chapter is uniquely designed to empower local wildlife enthusiasts – including anglers, backpackers, birders, hunters, gardeners and hikers – to have a direct and effective impact on the conservation of wildlife in their local communities and across the state. Our Wildlife Chapters hold nature programs, conduct field trips and work on wildlife projects and issues in their communities.
Learn more at www.ncwf.org/ncwf-chapters

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National Wildlife Federation 1945

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Certified wildlife habitats

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Registered Butterfly Highway habitats

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Wildlife Chapters across North Carolina

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Wildlife Chapter event participants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Great Outdoors University youth and family participants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

About our work

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Pounds of Litter Removed from the Environment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of NCWF is to protect, conserve, and restore NC wildlife and habitat. A broad mission such as this requires a broad approach.

Our current strategic plan (2018- 2021) can be viewed at www.ncwf.org/news/journals click on the Summer 2018 issue.

In general, we work to:

• Strongly influence state and federal policies that affect wildlife and habitat in North Carolina using established conservation models to guide our positions.

• Foster a diverse, robust network of wildlife chapters, members, affiliates and partners - a network fortified by a variety of wildlife and outdoor interests.

• Enhance and expand opportunities for youth and adults that foster awareness and appreciation of wildlife and the important role healthy habitat plays in sustaining wildlife and humanity.

• Sponsor and support programs for the conservation and enjoyment of wildlife and habitat, including ethical and sustainable outdoor recreation pursuits.

From the Great Smoky Mountains to the Outer Banks, our organization is made up of people who value wildlife and wild places and the many ways to enjoy them. We work collectively for the places and species that have no voice through our policy and protection work, research and education and direct hands-on conservation projects.

We know that making large scale, systemic changes that protect our wildlife and wild places takes patience, time, and perseverance. Hallmarks of our work include discerning, and then keeping in front of us clear, science-based understandings of what systemic changes are needed. We then build coalitions and partnerships and programs and campaigns that target existing underlying blocks to those needed systemic changes.

We pride ourselves on not re-inventing the wheel or going it alone, but in pushing together at points in the system that have a good chance of breaking loose needed change.

For seven decades NCWF has been a key leader and agent for change in how NC manages its lands, waters, and habitats for the benefit of all North Carolinians.
Our strength is derived from values-driven leadership:
•Science-based decision making
•Non-partisan approach to policy
•Stewardship of North Carolina’s natural resources
•Inclusivity of broad wildlife interests and perspectives
•Partnering with organizations and individuals who share our vision and our passion for wildlife
Our seasoned staff and board includes scientists and former heads of state agencies like the NC Wildlife Resources Commission and the NC Division of Marine Fisheries. Our statewide wildlife chapter network brings together hundreds of conservation volunteers to accomplish much at the local level.
NCWF’s cumulative experience and institutional knowledge has proven time and again beneficial to legislative, agency, legal and conservation interests that seek a science based approach to moving conservation forward.

See our annual reports at www.ncwf.org/news/journals :

Sound Solutions - restoring the long-term viability of our sounds as engines of both a healthy ecosystem and a sustainable fishing economy.

Butterfly Highway – public, private and corporate landowners working to restore habitat for pollinators across NC.

Community Wildlife Chapters - organizing voices for conservation to help drive statewide initiatives and tackle local conservation priorities.

Great Outdoors University - introducing youth to the outdoors and helping ensure the diversity of North Carolina’s next generation of conservation decision makers.

Clean & Green - inspiring and incentivizing community trash cleanups and habitat restoration by planting a native tree for every 25 pounds of trash collected and reported to the organization.

Deer Program - supporting farmers, sportsmen and community groups in sustainably managing white-tailed deer and supplying food banks with venison to feed the hungry in communities across the state.

Little Tennessee Native Fish Conservation Area - implementing a new national model for basin wide water quality management.

NC Camo Coalition - sportsmen and women monitoring and acting on issues affecting hunting, fishing, and conservation.

Financials

North Carolina Wildlife Federation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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North Carolina Wildlife Federation

Board of directors
as of 3/22/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. John Hairr

Ann Somers

John Hairr, III

John Crumpler

Steve Jester

Lloyd 'Jock' Tate

Billy Wilson

Bob Brown

Snyder Garrison

Bonnie Monteleone

Scott Fletcher

Luis Martinez

Stacy Nelson

Dave Cable

Wilson Laney

Robert Booth

Rocky Carter

Anne Radke

Maria Palamar

Jon Wall

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data