HOUSE OF MERCY INC

A ministry of the Sisters of Mercy providing hope, healing, and a home for persons living with HIV

aka House of Mercy   |   Belmont, NC   |  www.thehouseofmercy.org

Mission

We strive to give individual and corporate witness to the compassion and love of God to persons living with HIV/AIDS while embracing the values of sacredness of life, justice, human dignity, service, and integrity. We strive to create, through action and education, a more understanding society in relation to persons living with HIV/AIDS.

Ruling year info

1946

President & CEO

Latoya Gardner JD

Main address

PO Box 808 Physical Address: 100 McAuley Circle

Belmont, NC 28012 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-1733055

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

AIDS (G81)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The effectiveness of treatments for those with HIV has evolved to the point where living with HIV and staying on treatment carries an average lifespan and stops the spread of the virus to others. This has caused the needs of the population to evolve as well. House of Mercy's residential program meets a crucial need for those with HIV who have fallen through the cracks of the system, resulting in them becoming extremely sick and facing homelessness, with a residential stay being their best option for recovery. The objectives for our Bridge program are two-fold: to provide the support that people need so that they do not end up in need of a residential stay, and to help those who have rehabilitated at our facility to maintain their health outcomes after returning to a more independent living situation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

House of Mercy

The facility provides housing for up to six persons. Beneficiaries are persons with HIV/AIDS who are residents of North Carolina, low-income, and at risk of homelessness.

Population(s) Served

Small by design, House of Mercy's 6-bed residence has provided quality care in a home-based setting for more than 330 persons living with HIV/AIDS. Residents live in private rooms with home furnishings and personal effects to create an atmosphere that is comfortable and familiar. Residents are welcomed to House of Mercy in an environment of unconditional love and acceptance.

Population(s) Served

Each year, we plan for residents to receive 6,132 meal equivalents. This includes three meals a day plus two snacks (counted as one-half of a meal) for each resident. The forecast assumes 365 days x 3.5 meal equivalents x 6 residents (80% occupancy) = 6,132 meal equivalents. 6,132 x $7.57 = $46,339. This includes $10,200 for food and food supplies; $34,899 for salaries for food preparation and shopping; $1,240 for utility costs related to food preparation. An estimated $9,000 of food and meals are donated.

Population(s) Served

House of Mercy provides palliative services, however, our objective is not only to ease patients’ pain, but also to help those patients who have a chance of getting better. In some cases, aggressive therapies can improve a resident’s health so that he or she can be discharged.

The prognosis for HIV/AIDS patients has improved in recent years for those able to tolerate antiretroviral therapy. When provided with good care and proper medication in a stable environment, some patients who are in advanced stages of HIV/AIDS can improve.

House of Mercy provides specialized 24-hour nursing care and coordinates medical care including clinical treatments and therapies as determined by each patient's individualized care plan in consultation with their doctor.

Population(s) Served

A Coordinator of Resident Recreation and Volunteers provides activities to help our residents keep active and to grow socially, emotionally, and spiritually.

Population(s) Served

The House of Mercy Bridge Program provides support in the areas of case management, housing assistance, emergency assistance, and other areas as needed to low-income individuals living with HIV in the greater-Charlotte area of North Carolina.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of health outcomes improved

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Medical Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

House of Mercy provides antiretroviral HIV/AIDS therapies to all residents able to tolerate the treatment. Residents on ART consistently show improvement in CD4 count and viral load.

Number of clients who report general satisfaction with their services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Medical Care

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Anonymous resident surveys are conducted bi-monthly by a board member (nonstaff) and reported to the full board. Sometimes residents with addiction problems are unable to abide by the residence rules.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

House of Mercy currently monitors the following impact indicators/outputs (all achieved 2019):
- At least 90% of ARV eligible clients show improvement in T-cell count and reduction in viral load
- At least 90% of House of Mercy clients are satisfied with the care they receive
- Maintain the highest possible quality rating from NC DHHS regulatory reviews
- Resident occupancy in both days per year (1,700) and proportion (80%)
- Cost of residential care per person per day less than or equal to $430

With the Bridge program, we are also tracking the following additional indicators:
- % increase in retention in HIV care and treatment
- % decrease of homelessness and % increase in housing among those we serve
- % increase in numbers of eligible individuals enrolled to receive benefits such as Medicaid and Social Security Disability
- Improved self-reported well-being (according to the World Health Organization's 5-scale well-being index)

Coordinated HIV care is a central element of House of Mercy's program of services. Our client-focused strategy for coordinating care includes assessing a client's need for specific health, psychological, and social services; and assisting the client to access a wide range of services that will address those needs. Components of coordinated care include resident admission and assessment, development of a care plan including long term needs, ongoing coordination of medical services, monitoring the resident's health, and discharge planning when needed.

Many residents come to House of Mercy with complex problems. Often, residents might not have a family or their family is dysfunctional. They sometimes have minor children and might need to deal with guardianship issues and the day-to-day difficulties of having one's child raised by a friend or family member.

Some residents are recovering from addictions. Occasionally, when persons have been admitted to the facility from a hospital, their overwhelming illness has masked signs of their addiction. After they receive appropriate medical attention and nutritious meals in a nurturing environment, residents may experience renewed cravings for drugs or alcohol. House of Mercy arranges professional treatment for substance abuse if the resident is willing to accept treatment.

Some residents have a mental illness that has been identified prior to admission. This requires ongoing follow-up with one of the local mental health professionals. Depending on their diagnosis, the residents may take psychotropic medications.

In addition to substance abuse and psychiatric issues, residents at House of Mercy have complex medical problems related to HIV/AIDS. Their immune systems are compromised, and they often are at significant risk to acquire opportunistic infections. Medical science has not yet discovered how to cure HIV/AIDS, but treatments are available to improve the immune system and fight opportunistic diseases. Care at House of Mercy includes aggressive therapies to treat related infections as well as therapies to fight HIV/AIDS specifically.

House of Mercy provides 24-hour nursing care, assistance obtaining medications, coordination of physician care, transportation, and coordination of ancillary services such as physical, speech, and occupational therapy.

Above all else, House of Mercy is a home where persons living with HIV/AIDS can live and grow in a supportive community. House of Mercy is committed to these values:

* All persons have the right to dignity in life and death;

* All persons have the right to safe, loving, peaceful, and comfortable surroundings;

* All persons have the right to complete, competent medical care without financial stress;

* All persons have the right to a full life until death;

* All persons have the right to have their physical needs attended by competent caregivers when they can no longer care for themselves.

House of Mercy opened in 1991, as the Sisters of Mercy's response to the ongoing AIDS crisis in the greater Charlotte area. The residential program has been fully operational since then, with this spring marking 29 years of service to the local HIV/AIDS community. The Bridge program is new to our organization, resulting from a strategic planning initiative in 2019. It is being created in response to the ongoing and substantial needs of those living with HIV in the greater Charlotte area, and benefits from the long history and excellent reputation of House of Mercy as a quality care provider for this community. The residential facility has consistently earned a 4-star (highest) rating for Family Care Homes from the NC Dept. of Health and Humans Services and meets Better Business Bureau standards for charitable accountability.

House of Mercy works closely with many other providers in the community and receives a steady flow of referrals from area hospitals, infectious disease specialists, and social service agencies. House of Mercy collaborates with regional hospitals, HIV/AIDS service agencies, and other human service organizations to better meet the needs of persons living with HIV/AIDS. Hospitals are a major source of referrals because they recognize the cost-effectiveness of House of Mercy.

Fundraising is an ongoing process and our Board of Directors maintains financial reserves to care for our residents in the event of an unexpected financial downturn.

We have met our stated objectives and have provided a home and compassionate care for more than 340 persons living with HIV/AIDS and provided peace of mind for their loved ones.

With the advent of antiretroviral HIV/AIDS medications, more of our residents have improved and some have been discharged to independent living and returned to employment and family life.

In recent years, our Board designated funds to make available up to 1/3 of beds for 100% charity care residents (residents with no payor source such as Medicaid or Social Security). As a result, we have the capacity to serve immigrants and have, over time, invested in technology to facilitate communication with non-English-speaking residents.

Sustaining operational excellence at House of Mercy is an ongoing process. However, we have been successful in meeting our goals with the generous support of our community, and this has resulted in the expansion, in the last year, of our programs into the surrounding community with the new Bridge Program. This expansion will allow us to significantly expand our impact for the benefit of those we serve.

Financials

HOUSE OF MERCY INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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HOUSE OF MERCY INC

Board of directors
as of 2/25/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Cicely Johnson

USAA

Term: 2018 - 2020

Latoya Gardner

House of Mercy - President & CEO

Cicely Johnson

USAA

Yates Dunaway

Tri Bridge Residential

Jennifer Aliff

Hospice & Palliative Care - Charlotte Region

Nicole Fitz

Ally Financial Inc.

John Panzica

Queen of the Apostles

Daniel Kling

Belmont Abbey College

LaTanya Johnson

Hospice & Palliative Care - Charlotte Region

Cindy Tilley

Hospice & Palliative Care - Charlotte Region

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/26/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data