Sit-In Movement Inc.

Home of the Modern Civil Rights Movement

aka The International Civil Rights Center & Museum   |   GREENSBORO, NC   |  www.sitinmovement.org

Mission

Opening in 2010, the International Civil Rights Center & Museum is both a museum of the Civil Rights Movement, animating a historically preserved landmark, and an educationally activist organization devoted to the understanding and advancement of civil and human rights in this country and in the world. It commemorates the launch, on February 1, 1960, of the sit-ins at a whites-only lunch counter, in Greensboro, by the “North Carolina A&T Four" college students. Their non-violent protest challenged the American People to make good on their trans-generational constitutional promises on behalf of civil rights and social inclusion enunciated in the Constitution of the United States. The Sit-In Movement inspired by the A&T Four re-ignited the Civil Rights Movement as a whole.

Ruling year info

1994

CEO

Mr. John L. Swaine

Main address

134 S ELM ST

GREENSBORO, NC 27401 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-1856093

NTEE code info

Minority Rights (R22)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The International Civil Rights Center & Museum seeks to memorialize the courageous stand of the A&T Four as they launched, for posterity, the sit-in movement on February 1, 1960. The Museum, with its focus on the sit-in activities at the F.W. Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro in 1960, continues to educate and inspire the vigilance and fortify the spirit of all oppressed people to step forward in the ongoing struggle for human freedom and dignity. The Civil Rights Movement to end the oppressive regime of Jim Crow was re-ignited in 1960 at the former F.W. Woolworth building in Greensboro, the site of the 1960 lunch counter sit-in protest against racially segregated public accommodations. The ICRCM preserved and transformed this historic landmark to serve as an educational institution. 2019 marks the tenth year of operations and throughout the years, the Museum will continued to seek the support of freedom loving donors and visitors to help remain a as a site of conscience.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Museum Tour and Exhibits

The ICRCM has both permanent and rotating exhibits, presenting a broad spectrum of the civil rights movement. Visitors experience many of the landmark civil rights events of the 1960’s that set the stage for the Greensboro sit in. They also hear stories of NC A&T students and others who participated in the sit-in. Guests are able to see the actual lunch counter, as it was on February 1, 1960.

They view on plasma screens behind the authentic lunch counter counters live reenactments of the protest as it grew, drawing more demonstrators daily and filling all seats to the consternation of store management and law enforcement. This non-violent account is followed by archival footage from evening news reports of rioting crowds and other sit-ins as they spread throughout the south. Visitors then explore, the events of the spring and summer 1960. They learn about the roles of the church, the NAACP, Southern Christian Leadership Conference and CORE and others in the transition away from formal desegregation. Children as young as six are able to view the story of the “Greensboro Four” as viewed through a child’s eyes in a special Children’s Activity Room, courtesy of a video character appropriate for this age group.

Visitors explore more than fifteen permanent exhibits, including “The Battlegrounds”, which contain graphics and artifacts which tell the story of the struggle for equality and resistance to Jim Crow laws. They also see men and women of conscience, of every color and faith, mounting courageous resistance to these horrific and oppressive practices.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

American Association of Museums 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of paid admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Context Notes

We are seeing an increased interest in the services and programs that the Museum offers each year. Our revenue and attendance has increased.

Number of first-time donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Context Notes

Since 2016, we saw an increase in first-time donors. Many of them were are result of a news announcement and others came as a result of increased awareness of the Museum.

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Context Notes

During the last years, we have seen a spike in people wanting to stay connected to the Museum. Our mailing list is increasing and people are wanting more and more information about social issues.

Number of students educated through field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Context Notes

Each year I am seeing an increase in student visitation. During the last year, there has been an uptick in homeschooling visitation. It is surprising to see that students return with families.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As an internationally recognized “site of conscience,” the Museum honors the special brand of courage exhibited by four A&T University students whose combination of dissatisfaction, determination, and hope was joined with an urgency toward the idea of a better America. By celebrating an indispensable milestone in the course of racial progress in the United States and the world, the ICRCM leverages the compelling authority of this landmark site to carry forward the evolution of human freedom and equality.

Going forward into our next phase, our key concerns are centered on sustainability and development. We will invest the hard-earned experience of our first nine years — starting up and maintaining operations in a challenging environment — toward securing and advancing the long-term prospects of this enterprise, while keeping our eyes on the larger vision of its place in history and in the future.

This iconic landmark matters to the world. Rarely, when any issue of public civil rights advocacy is covered in the news with any historical context, does the story not include a reference to the Woolworth’s Sit-Ins.

The Museum is a world-class important National Landmark. We expect to expands its mission, and deepening its inspiring account of our country’s best story — the Civil Rights Movement, then and now, to make the promises of our Constitution true at last. Through vivid photography, video reenactments, and interactive galleries, our visitors learn about the daily battles to end discrimination across the country and they are moved by this experience. We believe that people of all backgrounds can effect social change throughout the world, no matter who they are. Indeed, we will increase support for this national treasure and still maintain admission-free educational visits for young children. We believe that our immersive tour should leave you changed in some small way.

With an extensive permanent exhibit brought to life by the passion and knowledge of a small but dynamic professional staff, we work to uphold the legacy of this International Coalition of Site of Conscience, promote understanding for an ever growing public, and advance the vision of a better America for all people.

Our seasoned and experienced interpretative staff are well trained professionals in the fields of early childhood education, psychology and managerial finance and others. The Museum is pleased to have a management structure in place to insure that the operations of the Museum are just as strong as the impactful tour staff. All associates are put through rigorous training before they are allowed to interact with the public and we feel that this is an unmatched strength, as we continue to operate on a small budget.

Most of all, our staff are hired with a level of institutional enthusiasm that can’t be purchased. We invite you to see our rating on www.tripadvisor.com.

Often enough, the last place where a significant historical landmark may be appreciated for its continuing consequence in the broader world is in its own neighborhood. North Carolina, so far, has one natural site which it shares with Tennessee on the UNESCO World Heritage list. Few would be surprised that it is the Great Smokey Mountains National Park. But even community leaders in the Greensboro area might be surprised that the International Civil Rights Center & Museum is being seriously considered for inclusion among a collection of sites to be nominated for a cultural World Heritage listing. The process of consideration for a nomination by the National Park Service to the international organization has been under way for a couple of years so far, carried out by a team from Georgia State University. The current candidates will be narrowed to a tentative set of 10 or so civil rights sites largely from the American South by this coming Fall.

Financials

Sit-In Movement Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Sit-In Movement Inc.

Board of directors
as of 6/27/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Deena Hayes-Greene

Racial Equity Institute

Term: 2014 - 2021


Board co-chair

Mr. Earl Jones

Greensboro Times

Term: 1993 -

Melvin Alston

Alston Realty

Edward Fort

NC A&T

Daniel Duncan

Duncan, Ashe CPAs

Hurley Derrickson

Retired

Doug Harris, Esq.

Doug Harris, Atty.

Henry Isaacson, Esq.

Isaacson Isaacson & Sheridan

Richard Koritz

Retired

Gladys Shipman

Shipman Family Healthcare

Bruce Davis

Child's World Daycare

James Morgan

Morgan, Herring, Morgan, Green, & Rosenblutt, L.L.P

Kibreel Khazan

A&T Four

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes