GOLD2022

Henderson County Free Medical Clinic Inc

Caring for Our Neighbors in Need

aka The Free Clinics   |   Hendersonvlle, NC   |  www.thefreeclinics.org

Mission

The Free Clinics (TFC) is changing lives together, with hope and health. TFC enhances the healthcare system in Henderson County and neighboring communities to ensure the accessibility of quality healthcare for uninsured, low-income clients. TFC works with volunteers and partnering healthcare providers to provide healthcare, prevention, education, medication access, and case management services, including specialty referrals.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

Rev. Judith Long

Main address

841 Case Street

Hendersonvlle, NC 28792 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-2212024

NTEE code info

Health Treatment Facilities (Primarily Outpatient) (E30)

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Millions of persons in the United States remain uninsured, despite the expansions granted in the Affordable Care Act. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, still more have experienced loss of jobs, income, and insurance due to business closures and long-term financial uncertainty in many industries. Some one in five of our 135,000+ neighbors in Henderson and Polk counties would not have access to quality, affordable healthcare without the support of The Free Clinics (TFC) and our community of 200+ volunteers and 181 health and community partners.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Acute Care Clinics

The Free Clinics offers acute care clinics to assist patients with immediate Medical and Behavioral Health needs.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

The Free Clinics offers several chronic and specialty care programs: Bridges to Health; Diabetes Program, Endocrine Clinic, and Eye Clinic; The Phoenix Project; and Community Case Management (including referrals to specialty physicians).

Thanks to 89 partnering healthcare organizations, TFC can enable access to diagnostic testing, specialty physicians, and surgical procedures as needed and on referral from primary care physician.  We also provide case management services to assist patients in navigating the complex healthcare system and obtaining the care that they need.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

TFC offers mental health services in three areas: Care Navigation; Counseling; and Psychiatric Clinic.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Recognizing the access to medications is one of the greatest needs for uninsured patients, TFC offers two pharmaceutical programs: Community Pharmacy and Medi-Find Prescription Assistance Program.

Patients can usually get their prescription filled at the Community Pharmacy (if it is on our Pharmacy formulary) on a short-term basis and then receive their long-term medications free from the pharmaceutical companies through the Medi-Find Prescription Assistance Program.

Medications received through the Medi-Find program are also dispensed by the Community Pharmacy, ensuring that a pharmacist oversees dispensing and is available to provide patient education.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

TFC emphasizes the importance of an individual's participation in their health and wellness.  We offer volunteer led classes and programs to support people's health.  Current Patient Education and Wellness programs include: Care Coordination; Diabetes Education; Flu Shot Clinics; HealthWays; Patient Health Advocacy; and Wellness Screenings.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics 2021

North Carolina Association of Free and Charitable Clinics 2021

United Way of Henderson County - Funded Partner 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of unduplicated patients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with diseases and illnesses, Substance abusers, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants, Incarcerated people

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of patient encounters

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The original goal of The Free Clinics was to bridge gaps in healthcare for those who may otherwise not seek care or use the emergency room for non-acute health needs. The clinic was created to address 1) the lack of affordable health care for the low-income, uninsured residents; 2) barriers in accessing prescription medication; 3) use of the emergency room for non-emergent needs; and 4) determine long-term solutions for healthcare by assisting clients through case management to establish a medical home. When we opened 20 years ago, our original focus was to offer access to healthcare for those without insurance and unable to afford medical costs. Since then, two dimensions have driven our evolution: requests from our local healthcare community and our mission of providing truly person-centered care for our neighbors. We are committed to walking with our vulnerable neighbors and enabling their health and engagement with the fullness of living. Experts find that getting and staying healthy requires three things… and thanks to community support, TFC creates all three for our most vulnerable neighbors. First, health requires access to clinical care when you need it. Now, 14 of our 25 programs fall into this category, ensuring that our vulnerable neighbors have access to the healthcare they need. Second, getting and staying healthy requires preventative care—things like screening for blood pressure and blood sugar, flu shots, and covid-19 testing and vaccination. Four of our 25 programs fall into this category. Third, getting and staying healthy means expanding how we understand what affects our health. Health is not just a prescription or doctor's appointment. Our life significantly affects our health. In fact, life accounts for 80% of health—everything from water quality (think Flint, Michigan) to exercise to safe, quality housing. Research shows that socio-economic factors affect 50% of our health; that means our most vulnerable neighbors—one in five in our community—have 50% less a chance of getting and staying healthy than you or I, simply by being poor. So, to truly make a difference in the lives of our vulnerable neighbors, TFC works to address barriers to health through our Patient Health Advocacy program. Because our patients had food insecurity, sought to engage their own health, and wanted to give back as volunteers, they created a community garden. Because our patients had transportation challenges, they suggested a bicycle program; TFC collects used bikes, works with volunteers to rehabilitate the bikes, and partners with the Blue Ridge Bike club for orientation and safety training when giving away bikes to patients.

To address the healthcare goals of access to quality healthcare, prevention and wellness, and community health, TFC relies upon volunteers, health and community partners, and donated goods and services to provide 25 different strategic programs. Fundamental to all strategies employed by TFC are our guiding principles: provision of the highest quality and person-centered care in the most efficient manner, maximizing both donated and volunteer resources on behalf of patients, strong relationships with collaborative health and community partners, avoidance of duplication of services, and empowering patients and families to fully participate in their health and healthy engagement with life.
Our primary strategies align to programmatic areas. These include:
1. Provision of volunteer-led clinics to that ensure access to care for vulnerable patients; such as walk-in medical clinic, psychiatric clinic, endocrinology clinic, and ophthalmology clinic.
2. Provision of “wrap-around" clinical care to ensure access to full continuum of care for vulnerable patients; such as community pharmacy, medication assistance program, medication therapy management, diabetes program, counseling, psychiatric care navigation, wellness education, and prevention services including wellness screenings, COVID-19 and flu shots.
3. Strong network of health and community partners actively engaged in the care of vulnerable persons; including seven hospitals, 22 primary care practices, 78 specialty practices, 13 mental health providers, three medication assistant providers (in addition to TFC's programs), four providers of ancillary medical services (including equipment and supplies), 14 dental practices, and two networks of care and additional supportive services, as well as 27 social service agencies. This collaborative network enabled 421 referrals to specialists in 2019-21 as well as 61 surgical procedures and 649 diagnostic tests.
4. Active engagement with whole-person care which addresses barriers to health (e.g. social determinants such as housing, transportation, and food insecurity), including programming such as patient health advocacy, community garden, and bikes for life.
5. Empowerment of highly vulnerable patients to actively engage their own life and health, including person-centered goal-setting with vulnerable patients, “functionality" assessment, and the active engagement of case managers, an occupational therapist, and a patient health advocate to support vulnerable persons.
6. Active listening to and engagement with both vulnerable persons and community partners to understand the changing healthcare landscape, barriers to health, and opportunities for creative and nimble programming to address both concerns.

The Free Clinics has built an amazingly strong organization over the past 20 years. Fundamental to our strength are our relationships, with over 200 active, engaged, committed volunteers; with over 180 supportive health and community partners; with state, county, and local government; with peer clinics throughout the state and nation; with over 1500 donors, funders, friends, and advocates; and with over 2,500 vulnerable patients each year. The Free Clinics primary commitment is to build and nurture strong, authentic, dynamic relationships with our entire community because 100% of the care we provide to vulnerable persons relies upon our relationships.
Our team is strong. Our board is active, engaged, and enthusiastic, providing strong leadership. Our executive director has served TFC for over 15 years and has over 25 years nonprofit leadership experience. Our management team is highly skilled and deeply committed, consisting of an Assistant Director (who oversees finances, IT, human resources, and community health programming), a Clinical Services Director (who oversees all clinical programs), and a Pharmacy Manager (who oversees all pharmacy operations). Our staff are experts in their areas of focus, including a doctor of pharmacy, three pharmacy technicians, six RNs and a certified medical assistant, patient educators and advocates, and skilled clinical and administrative support staff.
Our volunteer medical director is a published, award-winning, innovative clinician who is also part of the faculty of UNC Chapel Hill School of Medicine. Our clinical volunteers include many other award-winning, excellent doctors, psychiatrists, nurses, therapists, and pharmacists, many of whom serve as faculty in various teaching programs.
TFC's internal structures are award-winning. We were recognized by Americares and University of Illinois Chicago for our quality assurance program and invited to present about that program to the National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics. We have maintained the highest level of accreditation through the NC Association of Free and Charitable Clinics for over15 years, and we were the 73rd “deemed" clinic in the nation under the Federal Tort Claims Act.
Our team actively participates in continuing education and integrates best practices into programs, administration, and leadership of the organization.
Administratively and financially, TFC owns both its current facility and its prior facility, which is rented to a community partner. The organization has no debt, rather an operating reserve which we are building to six months, as well as a small endowment at the local community foundation. We have a legacy society currently consisting of 34 members which we are working to build.

TFC is an innovative, award-winning organization with high-quality, award-winning programs. Over the past several years, TFC has worked diligently to strengthen our organization, build sustainability, and continue our patient success. The Free Clinics-
~Won a national award from the American Dental Association for our Dental Clinic.
~Won a Community TIES award from the NC Association of Free Clinics and the Blue Cross Blue Shield of NC Foundation for our psychiatric clinic.
~Became the fourth “deemed" free clinic in NC and the 73rd in the nation under the Federal Tort Claims Act.
~Achieved and sustained the highest level of accreditation by the Henderson County Alliance for Human Services (now closed) and by the NC Association of Free Clinics.
~Conducted successful $1.85M capital campaign, exceeding goals; constructed new facility; paid off mortgage (no debt); and renovated for lease our former office.
~Built a $185,000 board-designated reserve.
~Maintained a balanced-budget every year, including surviving “great recession" with no cuts to program.
~Received the Citizen of the Year award from the Henderson County Civitan Club
~Was asked by local Healthy Carolinians collaborative to serve as fiscal agent for new community-wide initiative, HopeRX (modeled after Project Lazarus) to address issues of prescription drug abuse.
~Collaborated with Pardee Hospital, Blue Ridge Health, Community Care of WNC, and MAHEC on celebrated, innovative, award-winning project, Bridges to Health, which is being replicated around the country
~Founder and former board member Colin Thomas awarded the Don Lucey Award by the NC Association of Free & Charitable Clinics for his service to the NC free clinics and the people they serve
~Expanded services to cover Polk County and developed new relationships with St. Luke's Hospital and providers in that community; building Polk Rural Health Network as continuum of care.
~Executive Director Judith Long completed two year term as President (and six year Board term) of the NC Association of Free Clinics.
~Was chosen as one of four case studies by Americares (through the University of Illinois, Chicago), highlighting our quality assurance/quality improvement practices.
~Executive Director Judith Long was awarded the prestigious Athena Award which honors exceptional women leaders in over 500 communities worldwide; it is given locally by the Hendersonville Chamber of Commerce
~Executive Director Judith Long was honored as the T. Kennon Roberson Award Recipient for Management Excellence in Nonprofit Health and Human Services Agencies by the WNC Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals.
~Bridges to Health program chosen as a top three finalist for the Kate B. Reynolds Innovations in Rural Health Award
~Medical Director Steven Crane, MD chosen as the Robert Wood Johnson Healthy Equity Leader of the Year for his leadership especially with the Bridges to Health program

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Low-income (under 200% of the federal poverty level), uninsured individuals who live in Henderson or Polk counties of North Carolina.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    For our community garden, it was suggested to leave a writing station where tasks could be left for volunteers (some of whom are also patients), and communication could be passed between staff and volunteers. It was also suggested to leave some gloves and supplies outside. By doing this, we enabled volunteers/clients to come and work at will without having to check in to the office, including during times that the office is closed when it was more convenient for them to do garden work (evenings and weekends).

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The people we serve feel part of how our programs are conducted and that their opinions and thoughts are valued. Several of our programs (e.g. community garden, bikes 4 life) have resulted directly from clients telling us about the things they needed to improve their ability to live more healthy lives.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Henderson County Free Medical Clinic Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Henderson County Free Medical Clinic Inc

Board of directors
as of 02/17/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr Jim Hall

No Affiliation

Term: 2021 - 2022

Adrian Kerley

No Affiliation

Joe Crowder

No Affiliation

Greg Knight

No Affiliation

Tom Dickey

No Affiliation

Janet Cameron

No Affiliation

Ana Margarita Cellbollero

No Affiliation

Bob Davidson

No Affiliation

Bryan Hodge

No Affiliation

Betsy Lutz

No Affiliation

Jodi Scott

No Affiliation

Marcus Jones

Jim Hall

Shawn Taylor

Lou Parton

Josh Kennedy

Becky Elston

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/9/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/17/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.