Carolina For Kibera, Inc.

aka CFK   |   Chapel Hill, NC   |  www.carolinaforkibera.org

Mission

Carolina for Kibera's primary mission is to develop local leaders, catalyze positive change, and alleviate poverty in Kibera. This is done by promoting youth leadership and ethnic and gender cooperation in Kibera through sports, young women's empowerment, and community development. Additionally, CFK works to improve basic healthcare, sanitation, and education in Kibera. Serving as a model for holistic, community-based urban development world-wide, CFK has helped grassroots organizations develop youth-based programs in six other nations and dozens of communities in Kenya.

Ruling year info

2001

Executive Director

HIllary Omala

Director of Strategic Partnerships

Beth-Ann Kutchma

Main address

301 Pittsboro Street CB#5145

Chapel Hill, NC 27599-5145 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-2248495

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (S01)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Community Health Systems (E21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Poverty is a complex issue. Living in the the informal settlement of Kibera has many challenges related to basic health services, community well being, economic and unemployment hardships, as well as gender and ethic barriers that make opportunities scarce and limits the possibilities of a healthy life for so many. Poverty creates a landscape where hardships exist at almost every level, and therefore requires an approach that can provide support in every aspect of a person's life, from the essential needs of health and safety, to economic opportunities and financial well being, to a balanced psycho-social upbringing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Sports Program

The CFK Youth Sports Program addresses three key social problems: ethnic violence, youth unemployment, and public health. CFK brings together male and female youth of different ethnicities to promote community cooperation and development through sports. CFK runs the only all-girls soccer tournament in Kibera, and each CFK soccer team is required to be ethnically diverse. In this way, CFK helps assuage ethnic tension at a grassroots level. Organizational decisions are advised by a committee of male and female youth representatives from Kibera's eleven villages, and sports equipment is provided by the U.S. Soccer Foundation's Passback Program in partnership Sportsendeavors, Inc. (Hillsborough, NC).

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Founded by the late Tabitha Atieno Festo, a widowed registered nurse from Kibera, Tabitha Medical Clinic is a community-based medical clinic that provides primary healthcare and youth-friendly services to Kibera residents in partnership with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CFK has provided training for volunteers in the community to become home-based care providers, a program that has received generous support from Stop Hunger Now. Tabitha Clinic welcomes volunteer medical students and faculty from UNC and Duke University Medical Schools.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

The Binti Pamoja (Daughters United) Center is a reproductive health and women's rights center for 11 to 18 year-old girls in Kibera. Founded in 2002 by Karen Austrian and Emily Verellen, the Binti Pamoja Center creates and provides a safe space for adolescent girls in Kibera, an otherwise hostile environment for young girls where rape, prostitution, HIV/AIDS, female genital mutilation, poverty, sexual abuse, unequal access to education, lack of reproductive health care and information, and demanding domestic responsibilities are still common. The Center uses photography, drama, writing, and group discussion to investigate such issues in-depth, allowing the girls to confront these issues and learn technical information about reproductive health and financial literacy. Furthermore, the Center hosts monthly speakers and field trips, community service projects, family events, and peer education programs designed to further empower the girls and provide an outlet for them to educate their communities through drama, a newsletter, and youth forums.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adolescents

Although school in Kenya is subsidized by the government up to grade 8, high school is still too expensive for most impoverished Kenyans. The Angaza Program provides qualifying CFK participants and community members with funds to cover up to 100% of the tuition fees for all four years of high school.

More Than Just a Scholarship
CFK provides an intensive three-month leadership training curriculum for scholarship recipients, which prepares them for the challenges of life after secondary school.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

The Sexual Reproductive Health Program works closely with Tabitha Medical Clinic to provide HIV/AIDS testing and counseling, sexual health workshops, and one-on-one counseling services for the community. SRH educators also work across all programs to speak with young members of the community about HIV/AIDS and sexual health in a casual, non-threatening environment.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents

CFK's Lishe Bora Mtaani serves children who have been identified by staff and community health volunteers as severely malnourished. Focused on bringing severely malnourished children under five years of age back to full health, treatment at the Center consists of an 8-week feeding program in an early childhood development (ECD) or daycare setting. Early childhood educators provide educational instruction and support developing social skills while providing three nutritious meals per day, reaching 7 villages across Kibera. Lishe Bora Mtaani also incorporates both early childhood and parent education across the scope of its services.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Parents

The Tabitha Maternity Center opened in September 2019 and was designed to improve health outcomes for mothers and newborns in Kibera. In order to maximize accessibility, the facility is centrally located, has access to a road, and is open 24 hours a day. CFK facilitates transportation and engages with community leaders to ensure the security and safety of all patients. The program provides timely antenatal care with regular contact with skilled health personnel (i.e. doctor, nurse, or midwife), which allows women to prepare for delivery and understand warning signs during pregnancy and childbirth.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Parents

This one of a kind center in Kibera focuses specifically on serving the health and developmental needs of young people, ages 10-24. The Center provides a space for young people to feel in control of their holistic healthcare journey encompassing physical, social, emotional, and mental health initiatives. It fosters an environment that supports the protection and promotion of the health of young people by increasing their capacity to make informed choices. Leadership opportunities are provided to a select group of youth in the community using a Youth Peer Provider (YPP) model. The YPPs are trained to help educate their peers and encourage participation during center-based outreach.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Young adults

Where we work

Awards

Hero of Global Health 2006

Time Magazine, Gates Foundation

Reflections of Hope Award 2008

Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students who receive scholarship funds and/or tuition assistance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents

Related Program

Angaza Education Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Our Angaza project supports the highest performing young people of Kibera through a mix of scholarships, leadership training, and immersive field trips.

Number of youth reached through Sports & Development

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Youth Sports Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Patient visits to the Tabitha Health Clinic

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Tabitha Medical Clinic

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Girls served by the Girls Empowerment Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

The Binti Pamoja Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

As a community, we envision Kibera to be free of ethnic violence, where youth have a safe space to learn about each other's backgrounds and to appreciate diversity, where HIV/AIDS prevention is widely available and affordable, where healthcare in general is affordable and of high quality, where basic needs such as food or water are part of Kibera's every day life and infrastructure, where girls and women feel empowered to make choices for themselves and for their bodies, and where both boys and girls have access to a quality education and work readiness training to give them the tools to find, keep, and create employment.

Our three priority areas consist of 1) enabling affordable access to quality health care, 2) advancing locally-owned businesses through financial literacy and business skills trainings, and 3) fostering self-confidence, leadership, and understanding across gender and ethnic fault lines in order to build a strong community.

CFK staff members do not simply deliver goods and services to Kibera. Instead, they collaborate with community members to develop long-lasting, sustainable programs that help solve complex issues. Through direct involvement, community members become ambassadors of positive impact for their families and friends. As older participants assume leadership roles, they multiply impact by growing programs, engaging their personal networks and inspiring the next generation of leaders.The positive impact of these local leaders spreads, or 'cascades,' through the community.

Carolina for Kibera believes that community problems require local solutions run by local leaders. Youth are particularly important for Kibera's future; as one of the fastest growing areas of Kenya, as many as half of Kibera's residents are under the age of fifteen. Despite these sobering statistics, we believe the dedicated, resilient youth of Kibera will grow into a new generation of wise, empathetic leaders capable of affecting change.

Carolina for Kibera believes that catalyzing social and economic change within a community can only be sustainable when driven by those that are most affected by community issues. In keeping with that belief, CFK's organizational structure reflects our values. Our staff in Kenya is made up of sixty full and part time staff – all are Kenyan and many are from Kibera. In the US, CFK employs minimal full-time staff. In addition, hundreds of dedicated volunteers and board members support our Kenyan staff in whatever ways they can with no thought of reward.

Carolina for Kibera is also a major affiliated entity of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As such, UNC provides significant in-kind support for CFK, including office space, accounting services, and most importantly, access to the university's vast network of talented faculty, staff, students, and alumni. As a result from partnering with UNC and Duke University, we have established global partnerships with several additional organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control, ONE.org, Global Giving, One World Futbol, Harvard University, Stanford University, and MIT. These organizations serve and help build our programs on the ground in Kibera by developing initiatives and raising awareness of CFK's work.

Lastly, we receive support from generous individual friends and donors throughout the world. 98% of our donors are individuals, all of whom have directly helped to provide critical medical care, empower young girls, give children access to education, build sports programs for children, and provide community members with the means to start or grow a business.

When fighting poverty and violence through peace, a victory of any size is a remarkable victory. Through our programs, the youth of Kibera help create change every day by spreading messages of peace and progress, and by inspiring others to do the same.

Last year, our programs extended services to thousands of Kiberans, young and old. CFK engaged 2,191 youth in sports programming, awarded 77 student scholarships through our education program. 100% of our graduating scholars qualify for higher education based on their national exam scores. Our Tabitha Medical Clinic treated 34,475 patients. 4,768 adolescent girls were served through our Daughters United program which conducted 25 safe spaces giving girls the opportunity to express themselves. Opened in September 2019 in response to community needs, our Tabitha Maternity Home opened. Last year the home served 2,241 patients, conducted 431 safe devlieries, and reported zero maternal deaths.

Combating poverty is an ongoing process. But with empowered youth leaders making strides towards peaceful collaboration, progress is achieved every day.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    CFK improves public health and economic prosperity in informal settlements.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Based on feedback from the Kibera community, we established the Lishe Bora Mtaani Nutritoin Centre. With a belief that the community knows its needs best, we recently surveyed CHVs, MoH officials, and community members to evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of its Care Group Model concerning maternal care and child nutrition. Findings indicated that the model was successful, especially concerning behavior change communication, but that impact could increase by expanding partnerships with early childhood development centres (ECDs). In response, CFK established partnerships with ECDs throughout Kibera’s 13 villages, reaching beneficiaries who originally could not access care due to distance.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Feedback from the community is essential to our participatory development model. It is how we have operated since the organization started in 2001. By involving the community and constantly asking for their feedback we know that we are addressing their most pressing needs. CFK has become a trusted resource when it comes to addressing misinformation. As a result of this trust, community members come to us when something is not working.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Carolina For Kibera, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Carolina For Kibera, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 8/16/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rye Barcott

Co-Founder, Carolina for Kibera and Co-Founder and CEO, With Honor

Term: 2020 - 2023

Dr. Jennifer Coffman

James Madison University

Brett Bullington

Angel Investor

Francis Kibet

Duke Energy

Dr. Ron Strauss

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Claire Rotich

PwC

Joseph Ng’ang’a

responsAbility Africa Ltd

George Kuria

ACRE Africa

Dickson Omondi

National Democratic Institute for International Affairs

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 08/16/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/16/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.