Blood:Water Mission

Partners for enduring health and dignity in Africa

aka Blood:Water   |   Nashville, TN   |  www.bloodwater.org

Mission

Blood:Water is an equipping agency that partners with African grassroots organizations to address the water and HIV/AIDS crises. We do this by identifying Africa’s hidden heroes and coming alongside their vision for change. We provide technical, financial, and organizational support so that African civil society organizations have expanded reach and effectiveness in the communities they serve.   From our experience there is a lack of local, long term solutions to the water and HIV/AIDS crises in Africa. Our solution is to invest in scalable, African-led organizations and support their capacity building so that the investment will be leveraged for years to come. The target population is Eastern and Southern Africa, and particularly communities heavily affected by HIV/AIDS.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Mr Jake Smith

Main address

P.O. Box 60381

Nashville, TN 37206 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-2483082

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

International Economic Development (Q32)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (Q12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

HIV/AIDS is the single most complex health condition to affect communities the world over. In particular, the persistent risk of and vulnerability to HIV/AIDS in underdeveloped communities magnify markers of pre-existing poverty, stigma, lack of social support mechanisms, and gender inequality. Similar trends and patterns apply in the context of water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). The global HIV/AIDS burden is highest in sub-Saharan Africa, where WASH services are also limited. From our experience there is a lack of local, long term solutions to the water and HIV/AIDS crises in Africa. Our solution is to invest in scalable, African-led organizations and support their capacity building so that the investment will be leveraged for years to come. The target population is Eastern and Southern Africa, and particularly communities heavily affected by HIV/AIDS.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

WASH Partnerships

Through various technologies, the three areas of WASH – water, sanitation, and hygiene – work together to strengthen one another and maximize health impact at the community level. For instance, the impact of clean water is dependent upon access to and use of latrines and safe hand-washing behaviors, and vice versa. All three are necessary for one to be a success. And when local leaders rise up to form water committees to lead WASH solutions and promote health from within their own communities, there is no end to the change that can take place. We work with our local partners to provide access to clean water through a wide range of technologies. With knowledge of the local context, our partners select the technology that will be most effective in the community where they are working based on environmental, cultural, economic, and technological factors to optimize quantity, quality, access, and reliability. In many cases, a combination of technologies is required to achieve these goals.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
People with HIV/AIDS

Blood:Water’s HIV/AIDS programs center around community care and support. Blood:Water invests in partners that work at the community and household level to address individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS, comprehensively addressing psychological, social, cultural, material and legal vulnerabilities that occur through the continuum of illness. This work encompasses clinical support services such as palliative care, nutritional assessment, case management, ART adherence and other support that improves outcomes both within and outside the clinic. Our partners also focus on psychosocial care, creating support groups for those living with and affected by HIV/AIDS, as well as addressing and advocating against stigma and discrimination associated with HIV.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
People with HIV/AIDS

Organizational Strengthening (OS) is the capacity building processes through which partner organizations invest in and improve their institutional and technical capacities for the delivery of high-quality programs and efficacy of mission. This includes an externally-facilitated participatory self-assessment using the Institutional Development Framework (“IDF”), incorporating representatives of an organization’s board, senior management, and staff to allow for a diverse, unbiased critique. Partners score themselves across 4 developmental stages and identify priorities for investment. This prioritized improvement plan is executed over 2-year cycles for up to 8 years in partnership with Blood:Water, with up to $10,000 of additional funding each grant cycle. In addition, Blood:Water implements OS activities across the portfolio of partners, currently including peer exchange visits, a partner summit every two years, support with monitoring and evaluation, and technical updates and learning.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent

Where we work

Accreditations

Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA) 2011

Charity Navigator 2011

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Center for Nonprofit Management (Nashville) 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

WASH Partnerships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Individuals trained in WASH -- water, sanitation, hygiene (The significant increase in 2020 relates to the COVID-19 pandemic and community-based responses related to hygiene training in particular)

Number of people receiving safe drinking water from community systems

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people, People with HIV/AIDS

Related Program

WASH Partnerships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, People of African descent

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Total number of organizations benefiting from grants awarded

Number of HIV-positive people begin HIV treatment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, People with HIV/AIDS

Related Program

HIV/AIDS Partnerships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Individuals provided with HIV care, treatment and support; program and project shifts in 2018 (2020 decrease due to COVID-19 constraints and shifts in program delivery temporarily)

Individuals reached with interventions addressing HIV stigma and discrimination

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, People of African descent

Related Program

HIV/AIDS Partnerships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Community members who received awareness interventions addressing the fear and misinformation existing around HIV/AIDS will lessen environments of discrimination & stigma (2020 constraints from COVID)

Individuals with access to latrines

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent

Related Program

WASH Partnerships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

International benchmark is 1:20 for women and 1:50 for men (2018 results average 1:5); outputs based on scale of WASH programs. (2020 limitations due to COVID-19 and effects on program delivery)

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goals (Broad):
We want to see the end of the HIV/AIDS and water crises in African in our lifetime, and see stronger, healthier organizations in Africa.

Goals (Specific):
- Reach more than 20 communities with life-saving WASH and HIV/AIDS initiatives
- Engage 250 African professionals with the Leader Collective
- Help 4 African-led organizations reach the "expanding" stage by 2023
- Positioning resources for 11 organizations where needed most and neglected by other funders

Blood:Water partners with African civil society organizations to address the HIV/AIDS and water crises. We believe that local African organizations are the true drivers of social change, and best positioned to ensure sustainability long after we have exited. These organizations are often overlooked and under-resourced, creating organizational and programmatic challenges that inhibit their success in communities.

We work with local, African-led partners to provide clean water through a wide range of technologies, which they optimize through their local context. Sanitation solutions and hygiene practices are also vital for water to stay clean and to reduce water-borne illnesses. Local leaders form water committees to promote health and catalyze transformation in their communities. For a water point’s long-term success, we are committed to ensuring WASH standards are applied throughout programming.

Our programs also center around community care and support. Blood:Water invests in partners that work at the community and household level to address individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS, comprehensively addressing psychological, social, cultural, material and legal vulnerabilities that occur through the continuum of illness. Our partners also focus on psychosocial care, creating support groups for those living with and affected by HIV/AIDS, as well as addressing stigma and discrimination.

We strategically blend partner-driven and Blood:Water driven capacity building initiatives to strengthen our partners. The partner-driven activities revolve around the Institutional Development Framework that includes a participatory self-assessment, improvement plan and additional funding from Blood:Water. We also implement organizational strengthening activities across the portfolio of partners, including an online community of practice, workshops, peer exchange visits, and leadership coaching.

The following elements contribute to Blood:Water's capabilities to address and meet our goals:
+ Staff and external human resources with a blend of technical training and implementation experience
+ Network of partners (civil society organizations) in multiple countries and environments
+ Systems for grants, partnerships, implementation plans that reinforce accountability and best practice as well as nimbleness and constant learning

Achievement highlights of the past 4-5 years:
+ 100% WASH coverage in partner's catchment area in northern Rwanda
+ Vetting and selection of 4 new partners in 2018 and 2 new partners in 2020
+ Partner summits in 2015, 2016, and 2017 gathering representatives from our implementation partners for collaborative training, learning, and networking; Next one scheduled for 2022 and when COVID-19 restrictions are lifted
+ Rolling out data collection tools and systems

2020 Highlights:
685,319: Number of individuals reached with COVID-19 preventative education and hygiene promotion
5,986: Number of individuals provided with emergency relief during COVID-19 (including access to medicine, food supplies, financial assistance)
11,449: Number of Individuals reached access to safe water, improved hygiene and sanitation
4,832: Number of females reached with support for menstrual hygiene management
10,187: Number of individuals with access to improved hygiene and sanitation facilities
4,984: Number of Individuals tested and counseled for HIV
88,003: Number of individuals provided with HIV prevention services

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our work benefits people at both the community level and organizational level in sub Saharan Africa. At the community level, the WASH and HIV/AIDS programs serve the most vulnerable and at-risk populations. At the organizational level, our organizational strengthening programs strengthen leaders within the organizations and empower staff and community volunteers in their work.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Site visits,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In our partnerships with local African organizations, we receive quarterly reporting that includes narrative, core indicators, and financial reporting. The reporting process includes rounds of feedback for clarity and improvement before filed as “complete”, which reinforces the building of capacities and our role as a partner, not just a funder. We recently modified the core indicators after feedback from partners that some indicators were not core to the project (and the project's evaluation) even if they were potentially valuable to other organizations. We also collaboratively developed a Community-Response Monitoring Tool in the midst of COVID-19 so that our partners could make real-time adjustments and improvements in tracking COVID-19 data.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Asking for feedback has helped neutralize power dynamics, especially when we reflect back the feedback and collaboratively work to make improvements and changes.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

Blood:Water Mission
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Blood:Water Mission

Board of directors
as of 7/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Rich Hoops

Steven Garber

(Emeritus)

Kevin Clark

Brad Gibson

Jena Nardella

Rich Hoops

Collin Brown

Katy Byers

Katherine Carpenter

Chris Hobday

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data