PLATINUM2023

Blood:Water Mission

Ending health disparities. One drop at a time.

aka Blood:Water   |   Nashville, TN   |  www.bloodwater.org

Mission

Blood:Water is an international nonprofit that partners with African community-driven organizations to end health disparities caused by the HIV/AIDS and water crises. We find, vet, and partner with organizations in East and South Africa that are community-driven and -led. We pair intentional organizational strengthening with flexible financial support. We’ll know we’ve succeeded when partners have the essential systems and structures in place to help them increase their reach and deepen their impact. And ultimately, to share in the joy of ending the water & HIV/AIDS crises – with our partners and in this lifetime.

Ruling year info

2005

Executive Director

Mr Jake Smith

Main address

P.O. Box 60381

Nashville, TN 37206 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

56-2483082

NTEE code info

International Development, Relief Services (Q30)

International Economic Development (Q32)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (Q12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

One of the enduring problems with international development is that only 14% of funding from international donors goes to local organizations in Africa, so an astounding 86% of funding never gets into the hands of those closest to the issues being addressed*. Many local leaders and community based organizations are implementing solutions that drive lasting change, but they are under-resourced and under-funded. Despite decades of work and trillions of dollars spent, the linked water and HIV/AIDS crises in Africa persist. Despite decades of work and trillions of dollars spent, the linked water and HIV/AIDS crises in Africa persist. Every 2 minutes, a child dies from lack of access to clean water. In Africa, 60% of all new HIV infections occur in women, infants, or young children. *https://www.bridgespan.org/insights/library/philanthropy/landscape-large-scale-giving-africa-2020 **https://www.csis.org/features/localizing-humanitarian-action-africa

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

WASH Partnerships

Through various technologies, the three areas of WASH – water, sanitation, and hygiene – work together to strengthen one another and maximize health impact at the community level. For instance, the impact of clean water is dependent upon access to and use of latrines and safe hand-washing behaviors, and vice versa. All three are necessary for one to be a success. And when local leaders rise up to form water committees to lead WASH solutions and promote health from within their own communities, there is no end to the change that can take place. We work with our local partners to provide access to clean water through a wide range of technologies. With knowledge of the local context, our partners select the technology that will be most effective in the community where they are working based on environmental, cultural, economic, and technological factors to optimize quantity, quality, access, and reliability. In many cases, a combination of technologies is required to achieve these goals.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
People with HIV/AIDS

Blood:Water’s HIV/AIDS programs center around community care and support. Blood:Water invests in partners that work at the community and household level to address individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS, comprehensively addressing psychological, social, cultural, material and legal vulnerabilities that occur through the continuum of illness. This work encompasses clinical support services such as palliative care, nutritional assessment, case management, ART adherence and other support that improves outcomes both within and outside the clinic. Our partners also focus on psychosocial care, creating support groups for those living with and affected by HIV/AIDS, as well as addressing and advocating against stigma and discrimination associated with HIV.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent
People with HIV/AIDS

Organizational Strengthening (OS) is the capacity building processes through which partner organizations invest in and improve their institutional and technical capacities for the delivery of high-quality programs and efficacy of mission. This includes an externally-facilitated participatory self-assessment using the Institutional Development Framework (“IDF”), incorporating representatives of an organization’s board, senior management, and staff to allow for a diverse, unbiased critique. Partners score themselves across 4 developmental stages and identify priorities for investment. This prioritized improvement plan is executed over 2-year cycles for up to 8 years in partnership with Blood:Water, with up to $10,000 of additional funding each grant cycle. In addition, Blood:Water implements OS activities across the portfolio of partners, currently including peer exchange visits, a partner summit every two years, support with monitoring and evaluation, and technical updates and learning.

Population(s) Served
People of African descent

Where we work

Accreditations

Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability (ECFA) 2011

Charity Navigator 2011

Give.org (BBB Wise Giving Alliance) 2022

Awards

Social Innovation Award 2021

Classy

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of members from priority population attending training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

WASH Partnerships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Individuals trained in WASH -- water, sanitation, hygiene (The significant increase in 2020 relates to the COVID-19 pandemic and community-based responses related to hygiene training in particular)

Number of people receiving safe drinking water from community systems

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people, People with HIV/AIDS

Related Program

WASH Partnerships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, People of African descent

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Total number of organizations benefiting from grants awarded

Number of HIV-positive people begin HIV treatment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent, People with HIV/AIDS

Related Program

HIV/AIDS Partnerships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Individuals provided with HIV care, treatment and support; program and project shifts in 2018 (2020 decrease due to COVID-19 constraints and shifts in program delivery temporarily)

Individuals reached with interventions addressing HIV stigma and discrimination

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Indigenous peoples, People of African descent

Related Program

HIV/AIDS Partnerships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Community members who received awareness interventions addressing the fear and misinformation existing around HIV/AIDS will lessen environments of discrimination & stigma (2020 constraints from COVID)

Individuals with access to latrines

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People of African descent

Related Program

WASH Partnerships

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

International benchmark is 1:20 for women and 1:50 for men (2018 results average 1:5); outputs based on scale of WASH programs. (2020 limitations due to COVID-19 and effects on program delivery)

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Every eight years, Blood:Water strengthens 19 partner organizations, directly impacting 686,000 people.

Between 2023-2025 (years 1-3) we will add 5 new Blood:Water partners, 4 of which will join our WASH portfolio as three existing partners achieve graduation in 2025. Our partner selection and onboarding processes will be ongoing in 2023 (year 1) and the start dates of funding will begin in 2024 and 2025 (years 2-3). Our request for partnership applications, already in process, has a WASH thematic focus on climate resilience inbuilt to it to help us identify partners aligned with this critically integral theme to working in the WASH space.

We will also build out our Kenya office, network and team (years 1-3), including at least 2 additional staff members in year 1. The additional staff members will include a WASH and a HIV/AIDS Partner Portfolio Manager, an Organizational Strengthening Manager, a Leader Collective Coordinator, and a Programs Coordinator. These hires are prioritized in years 1-2 but actual timing will relate to the recruiting process and pools of candidates.

In addition, we'll provide more partners with vital organizational support offerings like partner exchange visits, leadership coaching, and our flagship Partner Summit (by year 2). Our first Partner Summit since pre-COVID is scheduled for September 2023 in Nairobi, Kenya. We will by then have also launched the Leader Collective online platform, extending membership and access beyond our community of partners to expand the diversity, expertise and influence.

Blood:Water works differently than most international NGOs: We believe that when organizations are led entirely by people from the same communities they serve, they are more impactful. Guided by our model, we find, vet, and partner with community-driven and -led organizations in East and Southern Africa. We support these organizations by pairing long-term and intentional organizational strengthening with flexible financial support. Grants focus on water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) and three overlapping elements of HIV/AIDS: community care support, combination prevention, and health system strengthening.

We commit to eight-years of funding (4 two-year funding cycles) and utilize an assessment tool used by civil society organizations globally for over 20 years to guide our organizational strengthening activities. Our model has proven successful with increasing the capacity of the local team and leadership, increasing the organization's financial health, and ensuring that these activities increase overall program quality through rigorous monitoring, evaluation, and learning. This is a recipe for a healthy and sustaining organization poised to serve their communities for years to come.

We specifically measure outcomes in 4 key areas across our eight-year partnership:
+ Partners strengthened to the sustaining stage of development
+ Increased program quality
+ Financial viability
+ Organizational autonomy

By measuring the % increase/improvement with each area as well as a combined growth score we can demonstrate the organization’s expanded capacity and reach based on our partnership with them. We’ll know we’ve succeeded when partners have the systems and structures in place to help them increase their reach and deepen their impact.

The following elements contribute to Blood:Water's capabilities to address and meet our goals:
+ Staff and external human resources with a blend of technical training and implementation experience
+ Network of partners (civil society organizations) in multiple countries and environments
+ Systems for grants, partnerships, implementation plans that reinforce accountability and best practice as well as nimbleness and constant learning

Our collaborators help us serve our people, who are the African-led, community driven organizations in East and Southern Africa tackling the water and HIV/AIDS crises. Each collaborator carries out interventions that are critical to our missional impact. These include:
- Startup and later stage funders
- Organizations directly implementing WASH and HIV/AIDS programs
- Technical experts
- Incubators and accelerators
- African, locally-led awareness organizations

Our partners directly implementing WASH and HIV/AIDS programs are included as collaborators because our model reinforces connections between them and opportunities to learn from each other. For example, partners apply for exchange visits, where staff from one partner visits one of our other partners to better understand certain facets of programming, models and training. Blood:Water facilitates the connection and provides funding for the activity.

We also maintain a network of technical experts across organizational capacity building areas to host webinars, provide leadership coaching, and provide guidance on specific issues and topics. As part of our organizational strengthening investment, most of these activities are funded by Blood:Water and curated to serve our partners’ needs.

We are part of the East Africa Philanthropy Network (EAPN), 2030 Collaborative, African Philanthropy Forum (APF) and other groups that are expanding our platform of influence as well as our connection to resources in our work.

Visit our website for up-to-date progress and examples of impact: www.bloodwater.org.

While we measure WASH and HIV outputs related to each grant, we gauge our impact by measuring outcomes in four key areas across an eight-year partnership with an organization. Our model has catalyzed the following with our partners:
+ 23% increase in program quality
+ 15% growth in financial diversity
+ 29% growth in organizational autonomy
+ 20% growth toward a sustaining stage of development

2022 Highlights from our Partnerships:
14,383: Number of Individuals reached access to safe water
1,243: Number of females reached with support for menstrual hygiene management
9,533: Number of individuals with access to improved sanitation facilities
2,496: Number of Individuals tested and counseled for HIV
11,457: Number of individuals provided with HIV prevention services

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

Blood:Water Mission
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Blood:Water Mission

Board of directors
as of 05/04/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Chris Hobday

Steven Garber

(Emeritus)

Rich Hoops

Impact Charitable

Collin Brown

Ardent Health

Katherine Carpenter

National Center for Leadership

Chris Hobday

Equifax

Eve Omala

N/A

Olivia Bahemuka

Belmont University

Liz Chamberlain

Humanitarian Openstreetmap Team

Julius Mbeya

Lwala

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data