LOWCOUNTRY FOOD BANK INC

Feed.Advocate.Empower

aka Lowcountry Food Bank   |   CHARLESTON, SC   |  www.lowcountryfoodbank.org

Mission

The mission of the Lowcountry Food Bank is to lead the fight against hunger in our community.

Ruling year info

1984

President and CEO

Nick Osborne

Main address

2864 AZALEA DR

CHARLESTON, SC 29405 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

57-0751835

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

About the Lowcountry Food Bank: Feed. Advocate. Empower. The Lowcountry Food Bank serves the 10 coastal counties of South Carolina and distributed more than 39 million pounds of food and essential products in 2020. The Lowcountry Food Bank helps fight hunger by distributing food to nearly 300 partner agencies including soup kitchens, homeless shelters and emergency food pantries. The Lowcountry Food Bank advocates on behalf of those who experience hunger and helps empower people to make healthy and nutritious food choices. For more information go to http://www.lowcountryfoodbank.org and connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

BackPack Buddies Program

The BackPack Buddies program helps to alleviate weekend hunger among more than 950 food-insecure children attending 12 schools in Beaufort, Colleton, Hampton and Jasper counties. Each Friday during the school year, the children receive backpacks containing 3 pounds of nutritious and kid-friendly food. A sample menu includes two whole grain cereals, two entrees (Chef Boyardee), three shelf-stable dairy items (2-1% milks and a pudding cup), one snack (granola bar), a canned vegetable and two fruit items (fruit cup and fruit strip). Volunteers assemble the packs of food for the children enrolled in the program to receive each week in their backpacks.

Population(s) Served

Cooking Matters at the Store empowers low-income and food-insecure families to stretch their food budgets so they can eat healthy meals. It also equips families with the skills they need to maximize the benefits they receive through public nutrition programs like SNAP and WIC which decreases their food insecurity. During the 1.5 hour-tour, participants learn four key food skills: reading food labels, comparing unit prices, finding whole grain foods and identifying three ways to purchase produce. The program ends with a $10 Challenge, where participants use the skills they have just learned to buy a healthy meal for a family of four, for under $10.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In order to combat the lack of access that many children, adults and seniors have to healthy foods such as fresh produce, the LCFB conducts Fresh for All distributions. Each Fresh for All is set up to resemble a farmers' market with 8,000 pounds of fresh produce. At a Fresh for All, approximately 180 families (an estimated 580 individuals) are able to select approximately 40 pounds of fresh produce. A variety of produce is offered so families are able to choose the produce that their family will eat and the quantity that they need. Because clients may be unsure how to prepare some types of produce, recipes are available for the families to take home.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The School Pantry program alleviates the source of child hunger by distributing 20-pound boxes of shelf-stable, healthy foods (e.g., spaghetti sauce and whole grain pasta, tuna, macaroni, peanut butter, brown rice, and canned vegetables and fruit) to more than 400 food-insecure families of children attending 10 high-need schools in Beaufort, Colleton, Hampton and Jasper counties. These monthly food distributions take place at the schools and are scheduled, when possible, to coincide with school events providing a powerful means of increasing parental involvement in the educational process which ultimately improves a child’s chance of school success.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

AIB Certification 2020

Awards

Governor's Angel Award 2016

Governor's Angel Award

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America - Affiliate 1983

Feeding the Carolinas - Affiliate 2017

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Metric is pounds distributed. In 2020, LCFB distributed 39.7 million pounds, providing for 33,076,067 *meals. *1 meal = 1.2 lbs. of food (FA MPIN)

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The LCFB is committed to strategic growth that supports equitable access to nutritious food and the goal of fresh produce comprising 30% of the total food distributed by the end of 2021. The LCFB strives not only to increase the amount and quality of food provided to our neighbors experiencing food insecurity but also to eliminate hunger in coastal South Carolina.

PARTNER MEMBER AGENCIES
- Nearly 300 agencies distribute food to those experiencing hunger and range from faith-based food pantries to on-site feeding programs (soup kitchens and residential facilities) to direct-service, non-profit organizations
- Agencies are responsible for 92% of total pounds distributed by LCFB
- Client Emergency Assistance Program – Provides emergency food assistance and referrals to partner agencies for clients who call or visit LCFB. Serves 150 households per month, pre-covid
- Wellness Pantry – Pantries that support health and well-being of the people they serve through pantry set up training that encourages clients to choose a variety of healthy food items and provides instructions for pantry usage

PROGRAMS AND INITIATIVES

SENIOR PROGRAMS:
- Senior Meals – Through partnerships with East Cooper Meals on Wheels, Charleston Area Senior Citizens, and others, we prepare and serve nutritious meals to seniors
- Senior Box Program (CSFP) – USDA program that provides boxes of staple goods and produce to food insecure or homebound seniors once a month

CHILDHOOD HUNGER PROGRAMS:
- Kids Café (CACFP) – Creates supper meals and healthy snacks to food insecure children enrolled in afterschool programs
- Summer Meals Programs & Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) – Provides free nutritious meals to children and teens in eligible communities throughout the summer
- Mobile Meals Program – Provides meals to children in rural communities
- BackPack Buddies – Provides children with nutritious, easy-to-prepare food to take home on weekends and school vacations
- School Pantry – Families are provided with a 20-pound box of staple food items to help stretch their monthly food budget
- School Market– Provides students and families the opportunity to discretely select food items to take home from a permanent pantry located in the school

Founded in 1983, the Lowcountry Food Bank's (LCFB) mission is to lead the fight against hunger in our community. The LCFB serves the 10 coastal counties of South Carolina (Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, Georgetown, Hampton, Horry, Jasper and Williamsburg). The LCFB is the only major facility for both donated food and USDA feeding programs in the region. The LCFB has earned twelve consecutive 4-star ratings from Charity Navigator based on its financial health, efficiency, and capacity. Currently, 97% of the organization's charitable dollars are spent on direct programs and services.

Our five-year strategic plan was adopted to significantly increase the amount and quality of food provided to food-insecure children, adults and seniors. The Covid-19 pandemic forced us to pivot while still meeting the increased and ever-growing needs in the communities we serve.

2020 Overview:
- 39.7 million pounds of food and personal products distributed in ten coastal counties of SC
- Distributed 14.5 million lbs. of produce (36% of all food distributed, total 14,454,362 pounds)
- 33,076,067 meals provided
- 211,070 meals prepared through the Zucker Family Production Kitchen (prepared in our kitchen)
- Distributed 190 meals per person in need in coastal SC
- Rescued and distributed 12.4 million pounds of edible food from retailers that would otherwise go to waste
- More than 250,000 individuals served
- Nearly 50% of the people served by LCFB are children and seniors
- 97% of our charitable dollars are spent on direct programs and services
- 4-star rating from Charity Navigator based on financial health, efficiency and capacity (in 2021 we earned our twelfth consecutive 4-star rating, putting us in the top 1% of all nonprofit organizations evaluated by Charity Navigator)

Financials

LOWCOUNTRY FOOD BANK INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

LOWCOUNTRY FOOD BANK INC

Board of directors
as of 3/5/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Monica Scott

College of Charleston, retired

Term: 2021 - 2024


Board co-chair

Mr. Brett Hulsey

Revolution Auto Brokers, LLC

Term: 2021 - 2024

Evie Evans

Evans Law, LLC

Brett Hulsey

Revolution Auto Brokers

Mike Smith

Ingevity

Amie Grimes

The InterTech Group, Inc.

Jeff Helms

Harris Teeter

Frank Lapsley

North Charleston Coliseum

Michael Mintz

Frames Unlimited

Monica Scott

College of Charleston, retired

Bill Trull

Carolina One Real Estate

Lindsey Douglas

The Boeing Company

Tiffany Crumpton

Blackbaud, Inc.

Dr. Diana Ross-Jackson

Charleston County School District, retired

Maria Mungo

Community Partner & Food Blogger

Michael Wilson

Prince International

Joel Smith

Food Lion

Rev. Dr. Byron Benton

Mount Moriah Missionary Baptist Church

James Chilton, Jr.

Greystar Real Estate Partners

Donald L'Abbate

Attorney, retired/Author

Erica Taylor

Charleston County School District

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/05/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/19/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.