SILVER2022

Cherokee County Meals On Wheels

So much more than a meal

Gaffney, SC   |  cherokeecountyscmow.org

Mission

The purpose of Cherokee County Meals on Wheels is to provide meals, service and personal contact to those who cannot provide for themselves.

Notes from the nonprofit

We continue to serve on the front lines during a global pandemic. Insuring our clients are safe and well cared for with food security and socialization. During this pandemic Cherokee County Meals On Wheels has delivered to the most vulnerable in our community over 200, 000 meals have been delivered by over 300 volunteers. It is so much more than a meal. We are the safety net for our community.

Ruling year info

1985

Executive Director

Mrs. Terry Dennis

Volunteer Coordinator/ Asst Director

Mrs. Jennifer Robbins

Main address

PO Box 1886

Gaffney, SC 29342 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

57-0773044

NTEE code info

Meals on Wheels (K36)

Meals on Wheels (K36)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

One in six seniors in the state of South Carolina is suffering with food insecurity. The purpose of Cherokee County Meals On Wheels is to provide food security, service and personal contact to those who are unable to provide for themselves. Our Mission has remained the same for 35 years. Our services are free to our clients who are elderly, home bound, and disabled. We do not receive any government funding. Without our intervention people will go hungry. Evidence of community commitment: we served 20 clients in 1984 but now we serve 400 Cherokee County citizens. Success is possible only through dedication of our community and our volunteer program.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Ending Senior Hunger

Providing meals and services to those who would otherwise go hungry.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Seniors

We are the only rural delivery option to the elderly, disabled and homebound within Cherokee County.  Our volunteers deliver over 400 meals daily, providing care and personal contact.  Our service area covers over 26 individual routes,  (132,000 miles per year), 104,000 meals per year at no cost to the client.  We receive no federal or state funds and do not charge for our services.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Seniors

Where we work

Awards

Mayoral Proclamation - Town of Blacksburg, SC 2011

Mayoral Proclamation - Town of Blacksburg, SC

Mayoral Proclamation - City of Gaffney, SC 2011

Mayoral Proclamation - City of Gaffney, SC

Award for Excellence 2012 2012

United Way of the Piedmont

Golden Peach Award / Best NonProfit 2019

Gaffney Ledger

Affiliations & memberships

Meals on Wheels Association of America 1998

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To end senior hunger in Cherokee County, SC by 2020.
Make sure we are able to meet the growing needs for our services and to ensure no senior goes hungry. Acting as a liaison to connect seniors with other agencies and nonprofits that provide services they may require. Keeping seniors safe and in their homes with dignity and respect. Our service is a peace of mind for family members knowing we will be checking on their loved ones with personal contact. It is so much more than a meal.

Continue to network with all community leaders, business, churches and individuals.
Meet with other Meals On Wheels programs in the upstate to ensue best practices.
Making sure we provide up-to-date information to our community. This will insure we are engaging Cherokee County citizens to make a difference and get connected.

Cherokee County Meals On Wheels has been serving the community for 35 years.
In 1984 serving just 20 meals to now over 9,000 meals a month are being delivered to the elderly, disabled, and homebound. Volunteers are the lifeblood to the success of Meals On Wheels. We began with only 6 volunteers to over 400 in 2015 these volunteers serve as Board Members, volunteer drivers, kitchen volunteers, office, and special project volunteers.

Serving Cherokee County for 35 years. We find ourselves in a unique place of recruiting volunteers within our community those that began the program are unable to volunteer or are receiving meals themselves. Social media has become a big part of our success for recruiting volunteers and donors. The challenge has been trying to keep up with the ever changing technology. We have become the safety net for our seniors in Cherokee County, SC. Working as the liaison for other services that a client may need to live a healthy and happy life.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve the entire county of Cherokee, South Carolina. We do not discriminate against race, age, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or income. All persons who need our services are served at no cost to them. The majority of our clients are seniors and are the most vulnerable in our community who would otherwise go hungry without our assistance. We are a small staff who empower a large body of volunteers in an effort to feed and check on our clients. Volunteers do everything in our building from making the meal to bringing the meal, to calling clients for well checks daily. These volunteers are directed by our staff and make it possible for us to have the greatest impact in our community.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Recently we found that our clients needed more than just a meal. We began to implement home delivery of extra groceries, personal hygiene items and minor home repairs. We also provide pet food for our clients who cannot afford it. This keeps clients and pets healthy and happy. Twice a year, we provide a fire safety check, and secure batteries, smoke detectors, and carbon monoxide detectors for those in need. For those homebound clients who were wanted to receive the COVID vaccine, we partnered with DHEC for an in-home vaccine for our clients.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners, Donors and Grants,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By asking for feedback, we have been able to focus on what is most important and what is best practices. It has helped us to be more efficient and more attentive to what the exact needs are. Our relationship has been postively impacted with our clients whom we have surveyed. Because we care enough to find out what our clients' needs are and how they feel about the services that we provide to them, they have more trust in our staff and feel more cared for than if we did not inquire about the value of our services. We cherish our relationships with both our clients and donors and realize that we cannot succeed in effectively taking care of the needs of our community without this mutual respect. The intrinsic value of our clients, donors, and volunteers is essential to our mission.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Cherokee County Meals On Wheels
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Cherokee County Meals On Wheels

Board of directors
as of 08/26/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Jordon Portillo

Real estate agent

Term: 2021 - 2023


Board co-chair

Mr. Ben Lonto

Retired

Term: 2021 - 2023

Joyce Moorhead

Holly Grove Catering

Chuck Moss

Hamrick Mills

Grady Hogue

American Community Bank

Kay Karns

First Piedmont Bank

Linda Pirkey

Kirby Memorial Baptist Church

Linda Stepp

Daddy Joe's Beachhouse BBQ

Monica Tate

Nestle

Melissa Dixon

Cherokee Medical Center

Carlton Bridges Sr

Entrepreneur

Rev. Joey Shetley

Pastor

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/25/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/25/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.