GREENVILLE PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

equipping preachers, pastors, and churchmen for Christ's Kingdom

aka Greenville Seminary, GPTS   |   Taylors, SC   |  https://www.gpts.edu

Mission

Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary (est. 1987) promotes an enduring Reformation by equipping preachers, pastors, and churchmen for Christ's Kingdom among the nations. As a complement to the local church established by Christ, the Seminary functions as an educational institution of higher learning and professional training. The core values of the Seminary are Biblical Fidelity, Confessional Integrity, Experimental Piety, and Ecclesiastical Accountability. The Seminary's distinctives are Affordability, Accessibility, and Individual Instruction.

Notes from the nonprofit

Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary is a Charter Member of the Association of Reformed Theological Seminaries (ARTS), an independent academic accrediting and accountability body.

Ruling year info

1987

President

Dr. Jonathan L. Master

Main address

PO Box 690

Taylors, SC 29687 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

57-0833937

NTEE code info

Graduate, Professional(Separate Entities) (B50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Reformed Christian tradition has always prioritized the need for an educated ministry in order to promote an enduring Reformation according to God's Word. As a theological Seminary in the Reformed tradition, Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary addresses the recognized need for an educated ministry. Without proper education in biblical languages, doctrine, and church history, men called to the ministry will not be able competently to fulfill the functions of the ministry: preaching, teaching, prayer, leadership in worship, church governance, and pastoral care. The need for men such as are equipped at Greenville Seminary is highlighted by the fact that more churches are seeking for Greenville graduates than the Seminary currently has graduates with which to recommend to them.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Divinity Program

The Divinity Program includes both a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) track and a Bachelor of Divinity (B.D.) track. The two tracks are identical in content, with the only difference being eligibility requirements of applicants. The academic requirements include 122 total credit hours, 12 units of Field Education (Internship) experience, and a Senior Sermon.

Population(s) Served
Men and boys
Christians

Where we work

Accreditations

Association of Reformed Theological Seminaries 2000

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Data provided here uses calendar year (1/1 - 12/31) statistics for each year indicated.

Average number of dollars given by new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Data provided here uses calendar year (1/1 - 12/31) statistics for each year indicated.

Number of new donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Data provided here uses calendar year (1/1 - 12/31) statistics for each year indicated.

Number of donors retained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Data provided here uses calendar year (1/1 - 12/31) statistics for each year indicated.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of church partners (i.e. donors, sponsoring sessions/presbyteries, tuition-waiver program participants)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Data provided here uses calendar year (1/1 - 12/31) statistics for each year indicated.

Number of conference attendees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our Spring Theology Conference is held each year in the second week of March.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary's goals serve to equip local congregations and regional church bodies (i.e. presbyteries, synods, assemblies, etc.) in both the United States and abroad. Our specific goal is to welcome 25 new full-time Divinity Program students each fall, and to graduate upwards of 25 Divinity Program students in each graduating class each Spring. An important complementary goal is to ensure that the costs of our programs allow these men to graduate without a burden of student loan debt from Seminary. Most importantly, our goal is to equip men as excellent preachers, competent pastors, and engaged churchmen.

The faculty of the Seminary provide education that exemplifies our core values of Biblical Fidelity, Confessional Integrity, Individual Instruction, and Experimental Piety. Faculty members serve as mentors and advisers to students, helping each individual map out his program of study to best equip him for the ministry. Faculty also serve as coordinators and leaders of student prayer groups. The Board and Faculty subscribe annually to the doctrinal standards of the Seminary, the Westminster Confession of Faith, together with the Larger and Shorter Catechisms, as adopted by the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) and the Orthodox Presbyterian Church (OPC).

The Board of Trustees ensure that the operations and educational programs of the Seminary exemplify our core values of Affordability, Accessibility, and Ecclesiastical Accountability. All of our programs are accessible by distance. We are recognized by the member denominations of NAPARC, among other international denominations.

Our greatest asset in pursuit of our mission is our faculty. With one exception, each of our seven resident faculty members has served as a pastor for at least five years. They are well acquainted with the unique challenges of pastoral ministry and Christian service. From this standpoint, they counsel and mentor students preparing for the ministry. Each resident faculty member holds a doctoral degree (Ph.D. or D.Min.), and is actively engaged in his respective field. Each resident faculty member is ordained in either the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) or Orthodox Presbyterian Church (OPC), and serves in the various courts of the church (i.e. local church sessions, presbyteries, General Assemblies).

Our administrative staff is made up of dedicated men and women who diligently serve our students (past, present, and future). Our library is made up of over 10,000 volumes, with more added every month. Our facility has four classrooms that can accommodate up to 30 students each.

At this point, we have awarded 243 degrees upon 235 individuals. Of those 235, six are deceased, eight are women, and 20 are currently not serving in ministry (at least four of those 20 are teachers in Christian schools and Junior Colleges). Thus, 201 out of a possible 221 graduates are serving in ordained ministry in evangelical/Reformed churches. That is, over 90% of eligible Greenville Seminary graduates are serving in a capacity for which their education equipped them.

In academic year 2017-2018, we welcomed our largest-ever incoming class of 30 total students, all of whom are progressing in their studies, going into the Fall of 2018. We are anticipating another record-breaking class this Fall.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The people we serve with our mission principally include our students. We college formal feedback from students on an annual basis (for each class taught) as well as upon graduation. Insofar as we serve local congregations of Christian churches, we college informal and formal feedback from these communities as well.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Every three years, the faculty of the school refer to formal feedback data to review our curriculum and to make adjustments where necessary. Over the past six years (two review cycles), for example, the faculty of the school has incorporate more Biblical Studies content coursework into the curriculum. We collect feedback from our annual Spring Theology Conference, and we have made adjustments in our program relating to the Conference's schedule and speaking portions in light of feedback received from attendees.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By soliciting feedback from the people we serve and acting on that feedback, we have demonstrated that there is an interest in hearing from our constituents and responding accordingly. In some cases, we have been able better to communicate our reasons for doing certain things. In other cases, we have made substantive causes to address grievances. For example, one big change we made in response to informal feedback was changing our nomenclature for one group of Spring Theology Conference participants, from "Student Volunteers" to "Student Workers." This seemingly small adjustment communicated the reality of student involvement in making the Spring Theology Conference the great success that it is.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

GREENVILLE PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

GREENVILLE PRESBYTERIAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY

Board of directors
as of 8/17/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Fredric Marcinak

Smith Moore Leatherwood LLP; Ruling Elder at Woodruff Road Presbyterian Church (PCA) of Simpsonville, SC

Term: 2018 -

Joseph Fowler

Hartley, Rowe & Fowler, P.C.

Mark Bube

Orthodox Presbyterian Church (OPC)

James Higgins

Retired

Kevin Backus

Bible Presbyterian Church of Grand Island, NY

Frank Aderholdt, Jr.

Retired

Lawrence "Del" Bailey, Jr.

Holston Medical Group

Gary Flye

Wells Fargo

Travis Grassmid

Zion Reformed Church (RCUS)

Ian Hamilton

Evangelical Presbyterian Church in England and Wales (EPCEW)

Daniel Jarstfer

Christ our Hope Presbyterian Church (PCA)

Cornelius Johnson

US Navy Chaplain

Jeffrey Kingswood

Grace Presbyterian Church (ARP)

David McWilliams

Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA)

Michael Myers

Heritage Presbyterian Church (OPC)

Charles Oliveira

Westchester Presbyterian Church (OPC)

Carl Robbins

Woodruff Road Presbyterian Church (PCA)

Bruce Vrieling

TD Christian High School

Dale White

Ameriprise Financial Services, LLC

Timothy Worrell

Savannah River Nuclear Solutions

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/22/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/22/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.