HALTER HEAL & LEARN THROUGH EQUINE RELATIONSHIPS

aka 1964   |   Spartanburg, SC   |  www.haltersc.org

Mission

HALTER and its horses enhance the lives of children with challenges through equine assisted activities.

Notes from the nonprofit

Please contact us to better understand our 990. Because we have a key staff member who is a volunteer, this skews our program related expenses by reducing them by the value of her time and what she would have in benefits. Equine Assisted Services, formerly called Equine Assist Activities and Therapies are a broad umbrella. The phrase "equine therapy" is not appropriate, although some of the services are therapy. We are delighted to have the opportunity to explain the why, what and how of what we do, and provide scientific research supporting our activities.

Ruling year info

1988

Executive Director

Nancy Paschall

Main address

P.O. Box 1403

Spartanburg, SC 29304 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

57-0864733

NTEE code info

Health Support Services (E60)

Equestrian, Riding (N69)

Citizenship Programs, Youth Development (O54)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Children who have disabilities (emotional/behavioral, intellectual, and/or physical) need access to recreation and activities that teach them skills for living. Essential skills include: communication, cognitive and motor (movement of the body) planning, self- regulation of behaviors, and following directions. Children with special needs, disabilities, learning differences, mobility issues, communication issues do not have access to activities that are designed with them in mind. Because of their a need for a high level of support and accomidations, and the competition focus of many activities and sports, children with significant differences often cannot participate. These children need a place where their differences are accepted, and they receive the support they need to be successful. Life skills are the primary skills needed by children with complex challenges (physical, intellectual, and emotional). Very few community based settings are designed for these children.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Therapeutic Riding

Children with cognitive, physical, emotional or multiple disabilities build relationships with horses through ground and riding activities that build riding life skills that transfer into the domains of home, school and the community.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
Non-adult children

HALTER contracts with the Spartanburg Regional Medical Center Pediatric Rehabilitation for physical, and occupational therapy that utilizes the unique motions of horses and a non-clinical setting to meet the child's individualized therapy goals. Contact Pediatric Rehabilitation for services.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children

Equine Facilitated psychotherapy is provided by licensed therapists for children and adolescents with a variety of issues, but primarily those who have experienced trauma, have addiction issues, or a history of self-harm and suicidal ideation. A variety of metnal health therapies that partner with horses are used to meet the needs of the individual.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Preteens

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International 2022

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Average number of service recipients per month

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

COVID-19 directly impacted the number of service recipients. 2 schools typically bringn 20 children per school. Due to COVID they have stopped seeking external services until further notice.

Number of direct care staff who received training in trauma informed care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Preteens, Family relationships, Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All staff have been previously trained except for 2 new staff.

Number of youth who volunteer/participate in community service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our volunteers are not typically service receipients, but we do include them in training and we promote civic engagement.

Average parent/caretaker rating of child/youth functioning and coping skills

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health, Age groups

Related Program

Therapeutic Riding

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 we implemented the Pediatric Assessment of Disabilities. We are seeing improvements in our lowest functiong children.

Number of children served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with disabilities, Children and youth, People of African descent, Multiracial people

Related Program

Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Additional hours of service for hippotherapy and therapeutic riding were added in 2019 and 2020. Psychotherapy, funded through a grant program was added in 2021. Equine Assisted Learning occured.

Number of children with a disability supported to live at home

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who consider the implications of their actions on others, their community, and the environment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Multiracial people, People of African descent, Adolescent girls, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Equine Facilitated Psychotherapy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This applies to equine assisted learning and psychotherapy. We had several groups of primarily African-American and Latino boys, and mized race girls who participated in one of the two programs.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The mission of HALTER (Healing and Learning Through Equine Relationships) is to enhance the lives of children with challenges (aka disabilities) through equine assisted activities. Children with disabilities also need to learn what they CAN do., Too often children with special needs, learning differences, differing abilities are told what they CAN'T do-- we focus on abilities! Gaining confidence, learning patience, building trust, building strength, flexibility, balance, communication, and building positive relationships are all part of every single service provided to every single child. Through working with equines, children with disabilities are able to address their very individualized needs.
The 2019-2023 Goals, per the Strategic Plan are:

A. HALTER implements evidence-based best practices across the organization
1. Complies with the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH) standards
2. Staff members are knowledgeable about best practices and regularly seek additional relevant evidence based information, disseminating it throughout the organization.

B. HALTER maintains a culture of safety, caring, encouragement, and accountability
1. Recruits and maintains volunteers capable of meeting the organization’s needs
2. Recruits and maintains knowledgeable, able, and skilled staff members
3. Provides ongoing training and education to volunteers and staff members
4. Focuses on the abilities of our participants; promoting their well-being and independence

C. HALTER helps to improve the community
1. Engage in partnerships and collaborations that promote the well –being of children with challenges and their families
2. Promote volunteering at HALTER as a way to improve individual and community health and well-being
3. Programs and services promote learning, personal growth and development

D. The HALTER Members of the Board of Directors are engaged, accountable and ensure that HALTER is compliant with the by-laws and all local, state, and federal laws
1. Members of the Board seek to identify potential new board members who will bring their strengths and passion for the organization’s mission
2. The Board defines the duties and responsibilities of the Executive Director
3. The Board reviews the performance of the Executive Director on an annual basis
4. The Board sets the annual compensation for the Executive Director
5. The Board routinely assesses its performance and makes any changes necessary to improve

Strategies include, but are not limited to:

1) Management and Leadership will stay current on and implement where it is practical and possible to do so:
a) the research in the Equine Assisted Services Industry
b) best practices in volunteer recruiting, management, training, and retention
c) non-profit management and leadership
d) equine care and well-being

2) Improving the messaging about the services provided by HALTER to the public, parents of children with disabilities, and other professionals who work with children with disabilities or vulnerable populations

3) Hire and support with the necessary resources professional staff to provide administration of daily operations and volunteer management (completed June 2019)

4) Engage members of the community with non-profit leadership and fund raising skills to join the Board of Directors

5) Increase the resources available to best meet the needs of the HALTER participants for generations to come

6) Be transparent in our stewardship of resources, our services, and our values

7) Be fair and ethical in our of our actions

8) Actively listen to our participants, their families, our volunteers and the donors to make sure that we are meeting their needs

9) Build alliances, partnerships and network with other agencies, organizations, individuals and funders to effectively and efficiently meet the needs of the region

HALTER is supported by an engaged board of directors, focused on meeting the mission and achieving the strategic plan objectives. The executive director is well recognized within the equine assisted services (EAS) industry as a leader. Currently she is the voluntary president of the Horses and Humans Research Foundation board of directors, which assists in keeping her knowledgable about research in the EAS industry. The number of knowledgable and credentialed staff have increased within the past 3 years, which improves participant outcomes, provides sustainability, and increases the professionalism of HALTER. New fund raising strategies are being developed to better support HALTER andto continue to improve the efficiency of raising funds.

2020-2021 Progress

1) The executive director, nonrofit accountant, and program coordinator have all been with HALTER for at least 3 years, providing professionalism and sustained effort
2) Polices and practices regarding volunteer recruitment and training, documentation and data gathering have been implemented
3) Partnerships and collaborations are underway:
a) Out of School Collaborative
b) My Brothers'Keeper (an organization serving youth of color)
d) University of Kentucky research on the outcomes for therapeutic riding utilizing a standardized measure are underway
e) a 4-H club that targets is designed to meet the needs of youth with challenges and typical youth has been started
5) Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System Pediatric Rehabilitation Services have been expanded by 100%
6) In 2021 the professional staff attended the international Horses and Humans Research Foundation Conference, and webinars through the year to incorporate best practices into HALTER
7) New donors have contributed at a significant level
8) A modular office building is being purchased, allowing for the expansion of services and partnerships
10) Donor appreciation efforts have been significantly increased
11) 5 of the horses are long-term free leases, and 6 are owned by HALTER
12) Independent study students and interns are being utilized to enhance the program and increase the depth of their knowledge of children with disabilities
13) A new strategic plan was developed in 2018 and will be updated in 2023
14) The by-laws have been revised
15) New equine facilitated psychotherapy services have been added (for youth of color, LGBQT, focusing on suicidal ideation)
16) The executive director recently completed a certificate program for youth serving providers

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Children with challenges, including those with physical, intellectual, and emotional/behavioral problems. We seek input from our participants, and their parents, as well as their teachers. We seek their input throughout the year regarding their goals. We encourage feedback in conversations with staff and parents/caregivers to keep the lines of communication open so that we can continually work to meet the needs of the children we serve.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have reached out to partner with other youth serving organizations, especially those serving those who are not accessing services, and healthy relationships, and opportunities, do not have equity in terms of resources and acceptance. We are building programs that address the needs of children of color, those who identify as LGBQT+, have a history of suicide and have been impacted by truama.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The feedback has informed the new programs, helped us better educate our volunteers and staff, and given us the opportunity for self-reflection. This helps us to look for ways to continue to actualize our values.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

HALTER HEAL & LEARN THROUGH EQUINE RELATIONSHIPS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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HALTER HEAL & LEARN THROUGH EQUINE RELATIONSHIPS

Board of directors
as of 02/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jesse White

Katalyst

Term: 2020 - 2023

Tracie Rodak

Spartanburg Regional Health System

David Ward

Southern Bank

Brian McCracken

Wyrick Robbins Yates & Ponton LLP

Wade Johnson

MD (ret)

Kenna McLarty-Wilson

SCSDB

Brenda Shields

REMAX Realty

Susan Gray

ret.

Elizabeth Morgan

Elisabeth Morgan, CPA

Gary Nesmith

Austin PT

Ryan McCall

Spartanburg Day School

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data