ANDERSON INTERFAITH MINISTRIES INC

Giving Hope and Changing Lives

aka AIM   |   Anderson, SC   |  https://www.aimcharity.org

Mission

Connecting people with support, resources, and education so they can empower themselves to be self-sufficient.

We provide direct services primarily to the Upstate of SC, but we do consult with other agencies to develop models for education and workforce development based on our programs' best practices.

Notes from the nonprofit

For 25 years AIM has been serving women and children, through the Women and Children Succeeding (WACS) program, by enabling them to acquire a quality education that will help them be successful in life. AIM's multi-generational approach allows both the mother and child's life to be impacted by educational opportunities. Our holistic approach is supported by the evidence of 156 college graduates, numerous community leaders from within this group, and the $182,407,680 economic impact of removing these families from social services and instead providing tax paying and contributing members of the community. Given an average total investment of $38,500 per family to achieve a college degree, that makes your ROI 99.967% per graduate. We've also had a WACS child become a Bill & Melinda Gates Millennial Scholar with a full ride to Clemson Univ.

Ruling year info

1991

Executive Director

Mrs. Kristi King-Brock

Main address

P.O. Box 1136

Anderson, SC 29622-1136 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

57-0896524

NTEE code info

Economic Development (S30)

Financial Counseling, Money Management (P51)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In Upstate SC, among people 25+ years of age, there is an average of 82.2% of the population with a high school diploma, while only an average of 19.5% have a bachelor's degree or higher. https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/PST045215/45007,4501360. In SC the variance on median incomes is $25,816 for diploma holders and $42,869 for degree holders. That is a 60% earning gap.
According to a Forbes article, The Rise and Downfall of the American Single Mother, “…three-quarters of single mothers are in the workforce…62% are employed in retail or service industries. Single mothers' economic vulnerability is also hugely impacted by the fact that they are their children's sole caretakers…If a child gets sick, a single mother is faced with leaving work and risking her job. In relationship to wealth and asset building, the costs associated with single parenting—childcare, housing, health care, and other expenses—contribute to the economic insecurity and instability of single mothers."

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Women and Children Succeeding

The Women and Children Succeeding Program is designed to give disadvantaged women and children the benefits of value-oriented educational environments that will enrich their lives with opportunities for success. This service will also remove barriers that prevent families from breaking free of the welfare system by providing quality childcare so that mothers can return to college.

Each participant is matched with a trained volunteer mentor who is going to be the most effective in facilitating growth and development in her career and personal life.

Life skills training is provided to participants by professionals in the community. This mandatory training includes budget counseling, self-esteem issues, resume writing, parenting, and more. WACS is a holistic, supportive services program.

There are two other locations modeled off of this and our Employment Pathways programs. They are located in Greenville and Columbia SC.

Population(s) Served

The Basic Needs Assistance Program assesses each client’s abilities, and needs then develops a client-centered plan for stabilization and success. The program is designed to give financial assistance and counseling to the disadvantaged, helping them identify their core problems (depression, alcoholism, lack of budgeting skills, lack of training) so that we can address these core problems rather than simply treating the client's symptoms (rent, electric bill, etc.). We offer rent and utility assistance, referrals to internal programs, and referrals to outside agencies that can address additional issues outside of our services.

Population(s) Served

AIM offers emergency food assistance to disadvantaged families in Anderson County. Families may receive food once per month and see an on-site Benefit Bank volunteer to apply for or renew SNAP benefits. AIM's food pantry is a leading hunger relief site, capitalizing on rescued food by sharing with other hunger relief organizations. Volunteers take food to seniors and disabled individuals without the means to come to the pantry.

Population(s) Served

Education and Workforce Development (Employment Pathways) assists low-income individuals with books, fees, tuition, childcare assistance, and transportation (as needed) so that they can complete vocational certification training at a local technical school. Training will enable them to gain employment at a livable wage and reduce dependence on social services.

Population(s) Served

Emergency Home Repairs: assists low-income homeowners with repairs that will allow them to remain safely in their home. This is not a home improvement program; to qualify there must be a home safety issue. These projects are completed by licensed contractors in conjunction with the SC Housing Trust Fund.
Ramps and Minor Repairs: enables many elderly and disabled homeowners to be self-sufficient and remain in their familiar home environment by providing them with a ramp and/or minor repairs. Volunteers from churches and civic groups provide the labor and keep the cost of this program to supplies.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of program graduates

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Women and Children Succeeding

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The Women and Children Succeeding Program (WACS) helps single moms complete college degrees. We anticipate 4 college graduates in the coming year. Degrees increase income and self-sufficiency.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers include education and workforce programs; Women and Children Succeeding (WACS) and Employment Pathways. Several of these clients were referred from AIM's basic needs programs.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number of clients served includes the entire organization and is unduplicated. Strategy in 2016 provided thorough assessments of every client and required accountability. This reduced the numbers

Number of clients who complete job skills training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Occupational skills certifications. The 2014-2015 FY was the pilot year of the program. Fifty-four percent of all jobs are middle-skill, only 30% of workforce is equipped; there is a 24% skills gap.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Women and Children Succeeding

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Although we had partnerships prior to 2016, the metric was not tracked before 2016. This applies to education and workforce programs; Women and Children Succeeding (WACS) and Employment Pathways.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

• Infrastructure development: Strengthen infrastructure systems, policies, and procedures as a foundation for growth and increased impact.
• Increased internal connectivity: Create and strengthen program connectivity to increase client services and staff collaboration.
• Data-driven decision making: apricot software platform to generate data for organizational decisions.
• Program expansion: workforce: Leverage opportunities for partnership and funding to expand workforce development programs.
• Program clarification: housing: Housing rehabilitation allows families to maintain self-sufficiency.

• Budget and program planning that diversifies funding streams
• Infrastructure enhancements that prepare the organization for sustainable growth
• Expanded connectivity among and between programs
• External and internal marketing and communication plan
• Apricot operational and used for decision making
• Program evaluation and program decision systems
• Capital needs plan that prioritizes based on program impact
• Realigned responsibilities to increase program connectivity, staff development, and client impact
• Increase effective use of volunteers

AIM's leadership comes from professional positions in community and workforce development. The Executive Director built AIM from an organization that paid utility bills, provided food, and had an annual budget of $40,000 to an organization that has a continuum of services that builds self-sufficiency and has a more than $3 million total budget. The VP of Programs has worked with AIM for nearly 5 years and ran the hunger ministries which has more than a $1.5 million budget and numerous human resources to manage.
AIM's staff consists of 5 professional program directors that meet monthly to review programs and ways to improve the processes for helping clients be successful. We also have three development staff to help raise funds to ensure program activities can take place. There are several other staff members and AmeriCorps VISTA service members who help with serving clients and building capacity for the organization.
AIM's dedicated board of directors supports our work at 100% giving, for a total board gift of $33,786 in 2018.

• All departments have created high-level process and procedure manuals and are continuing to drill down on each of their programs.
• We modified our organizational chart and refer back to it for dealing with issues of chain of command.
• A new website development that is more user-friendly and makes online giving easier was launched.
• Implemented Mobile Cause to attract millennial giving and are integrating it with QuickBooks and Donor Perfect for a system of checks and balances.
• We wrote and were awarded, an AmeriCorps VISTA grant that allows for six FT capacity building service workers.
• Apricot software implemented for two program areas, Charity Tracker software for basic needs services, QuickBooks for financial management, and Donor Perfect and Grant Hub for funder and deadline management.
• Refrigerated truck acquired and regular routes established for food rescue. Excess food that is perishable is shared with other local non-profits to make sure that as little food as possible goes to waste.
• In the process of completing a new, safe entryway for the semis and refrigerated trucks to access the loading dock for deliveries.
• Installed energy efficient LED lighting in the majority of our six buildings.
• Program directors work together to provide referrals for services and to make sure that participants have the holistic supports needed for success.
• A centralized intake developed that allows more connectivity to all internal programs for which clients qualify, and referrals to sources outside of the agency to meet needs we don't serve.
• Program directors using SMART goals with tracking to ensure clients are served through all relevant program areas.
• Since our Riley Institute study, we hired an Impact Specialist to develop best practices for evaluation to create results-based programs.
• We have continued to build upon our relationship with the local community college to accomplish mutually beneficial outcomes.
• We have a reverse referral process with the local Workforce Investment Opportunity Act (WIOA) entity.
• We are partnering with the Anderson County Economic Development Office and Vocational Rehab to help build the needed workforce and partnerships for success.
• We are working to develop a workforce program with local employers for retention of 'at-risk' employees. This year has been successful with the first two projects.
• AIM also advocates for public/private partnerships.
• We have clarified that housing rehabilitation plays an integral role at AIM.
• It was determined that AIM's Housing Rehab program is critical to helping move families to self-sufficiency.
• We are in the process of working with government entities to build capacity so we may leverage more money to improve the housing stock in Anderson County.
• It was decided to bring in an AmeriCorps VISTA to build capacity in the housing programs.

Financials

ANDERSON INTERFAITH MINISTRIES INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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ANDERSON INTERFAITH MINISTRIES INC

Board of directors
as of 7/15/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs Ala Chappelear

Chappelear & Associates, Keller-Williams

Term: 2017 - 2021

Steve Nail

Anderson University

Robin Sellars

Arthrex

Johnice Moore

Anderson School District 5

Eddie Maddox

Timken

Rick Adkins

Congressman Jeff Duncan's Office

Bonita Fambrough

10 Star Fitness

Michael Dill

Retired - AT&T

Luis Martinez, II

TD Bank

Josh Allen

Allen and Allen Law Firm/ City of Anderson

Scott Junkins

Harris Flooring America

Andrea Craft

Cabi and Craft Properties

Ala Chappelear

Chappelear & Associates, Keller-Williams

David Burriss

David Christopher Properties

Emily DeRoberts

Duke Energy Carolinas

William Coxe

Greenwood Capital for CountyBank

Kyle Newton

Anderson School District 5

Jennifer Meeks

Electrolux

Juana Slade

AnMed Medical Center

Ann Jashwhich

Wells Fargo

Stephen Dickey

Grace Church

Dr Ankoma Anderson

Wlefare Baptist Church

Floy Anderson

Kenyon, Lusk & Anderson

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/15/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/15/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.