Charleston Jewish Federation

Now We Go Forward

Charleston, SC   |  www.jewishcharleston.org

Mission

The mission of the Charleston Jewish Federation (CJF) is to build, secure and sustain Jewish life in Charleston, Israel, and around the world. CJF works through collaborations with local and international partners to: cultivate Jewish life and Jewish education; strengthen our connection to Israel and Jewish peoplehood; create a community of shared responsibility by caring for vulnerable populations; and engage the next generation through meaningful connections and leadership development.

Ruling year info

1952

CEO

Judi Corsaro

Main address

176 Croghan Spur Rd Ste 100

Charleston, SC 29407 USA

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EIN

57-6000188

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1947, CJF has been a leading philanthropic agency in the greater Charleston area, providing connection, security, community and financial support for those in need here at home, Israel and around the world. As the convener of the Jewish community, the Charleston Jewish Federation bridges local Jewish organizations to each other and to the greater Jewish world. By serving the underserved, we provide a place of belonging for anyone who identifies with the Jewish people.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Jewish Life and Jewish Education

REMEMBER Program for Holocaust Education and Genocide Awareness: Annual Yom HaShoah Holocaust Remembrance Day, Holocaust educational resources including a speakers bureau, The REMEMBER Project-Holocaust program- teen cohort, Jewish Community Relations Council of Greater Charleston (JCRC-GC), Jewish Education Loan Fund (JELF), Charleston Jewish Voice,
Max Kirshstein Community Youth Endowment Award

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Jewish people

Israel Engagement Initiatives: Partnership2Gether, Community Shlichim (Israel Emissary)-, Israel Education Fellowship (IEF), Birthright.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Jewish people

Charleston Jewish Family Services, Senior Outreach Initiative, Kosher Food Pantry

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

NAGID 360 Leadership Institute, Family Engagement, including PJ Library and PJ Our Way, Shalom Baby, Young Adult Division (YAD), Overnight Jewish Camping

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Local children receiving free monthly Jewish books through CJF's PJ Library program.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth

Related Program

Next Generation Engagement

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each month PJ Library and PJ Our Way sends an age-appropriate, Jewish-content book or CD to enrolled children between the ages of six months to eight years.

Unique connections made between young Jewish adults through the Young Adult Division (YAD).

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Next Generation Engagement

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The Young Adult Division (YAD) and NAGID 360, the community's leadership institute, are ways for young professionals in greater Charleston to make connections and serve the greater community.

Pounds of food distributed through the Kosher Food Pantry to local families facing food insecurity.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers, Children and youth, Adults

Related Program

Vulnerable Populations

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Fresh X-Press is our local communal response to hunger and those facing food insecurity. Nutritious food is distributed to the most vulnerable members of the greater community.

Number of Children and Teachers who heard directly from a Holocaust survivor

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Adults

Related Program

Jewish Life and Jewish Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our Remember Program spreads awareness about the Holocaust through first-hand accounts from Holocaust survivors,, workshops with teachers, and programs in the greater community.

Participated in the Israel Education Fellowship program, tripling the funding they are saving for an educational program in Israel through matching funds from their synagogues and the Federation.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Adolescents, Preteens

Related Program

Israel and Jewish Peoplehood

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Local students participate in the Israel Education Fellowship Program (IEF), a matching program that helps families save in order to send their children to Israel.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

In order to adapt to changes and gauge the needs of a growing and diverse local Jewish community, the Charleston Jewish Federation spearheaded a Community Strategic Planning process, which concluded with three main priorities: to welcome newcomers and encourage them to become part of our community; to attract and retain more Jewish individuals through jobs, networking, recruiting and mentoring; and to engage individuals and families in outlying areas.

These conclusions reinforced CJF's organizational priorities and highlighted ways to improve and do things differently. CJF's core priorities support our shared community priorities, promote growth, and plan for a strong community:
• Enhancing and Deepening our Commitment to Jewish Philanthropy
• Cultivating Jewish Life & Jewish Education
• Strengthening our Connection to Israel & Jewish Peoplehood
• Creating a Community of Shared Responsibility
• Engaging the Next Generation in Jewish Life: Engagement & Leadership Development
• Securing our Jewish Institutions and Jewish Community and Combating Antisemitism

In order to support these core priorities, the Charleston Jewish Federation has focused on securing resources for the following programs and initiatives for the benefit of our community:

• Life & Legacy Planned Giving Initiative
• Holocaust Education and Anti-Bias Training
• One Happy Camper/Overnight Jewish Camping/Israel Program Incentives
• Regional Security Program
• PJ Library Jewish Book Subscription Program
• Leadership Development Initiatives for Teens and Young Adults
• Advocacy on Issues of Importance to the Jewish community
• Grant-making to Nonprofits that support our mission in greater Charleston, Israel and around the world

These are exciting times for our greater Charleston Jewish community, and we look forward to continuing to work to continue to create a vibrant supportive, and inclusive Jewish community.

Since 1949, the Charleston Jewish Federation has served as a convener for the local Jewish community. Thanks to generous local donors, our Annual Community Campaign provides critical financial support to local agencies and synagogues across greater Jewish Charleston, in Israel, and around the world.

CJF's professional staff includes a Chief Executive Officer, Assistant Director, Director of Strategic Initiatives and Community Engagement, Outreach Coordinator, as well as a part-time Accountant.

CJF's Board of Directors provides oversight and leadership to ensure our mission and vision. The Executive Board includes a President, President-Elect, two Vice Presidents, Treasurer, Secretary, and Jewish Endowment Foundation President.

Dollars raised through our Annual Community Campaign allow us to meet the needs of our local and overseas communities. Although we have increased allocations from campaign dollars to agencies for the past several years, requests for additional support are always present.

CJF's objective is to ensure that the infrastructure, communications, and shared resources are always in place and prepared to meet current and future circumstances.

Thousands of individuals rely on the programs and services provided by CJF, through our community events and initiatives, beneficiary agencies, and national and international partners. Our goal is to increase allocations through the growth of our Annual Community Campaign in order to support the expansion of services and programs to our growing community. By sustaining a connected an inclusive Jewish community, we will be able to fulfill our shared community goals together, now and for future generations.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Charleston Jewish Federation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Charleston Jewish Federation

Board of directors
as of 06/28/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ava Kleinman

Ava Kleinman

Michael Mills

Ilene Turbow

Eileen Chepenik

Sharon Hox

Elliott Lessen

Ellen Hoffman

Marilyn Hoffman

Hilary Rieck

Josh Reeves

Abby Leibowitz

Rachel Landis

Joann Sherman

Scot Rittenbaum

Shara Star

Ijo Toporek

Brian Shulman

Kapri Kreps

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/10/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.