Humane Society of Hall County

Life Savers

aka Humane Society of Northeast Georgia   |   Gainesville, GA   |  www.HSNEGA.org

Mission

To establish a community recognized for responsible pet ownership and humane treatment of animals by offering basic pet wellness and spay/neuter services, public education, and placement of companion animals.

Ruling year info

1981

Executive Director

Allison Mayfield

Main address

845 West Ridge Road

Gainesville, GA 30501 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-0678817

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Nonprofit Management (S50)

Voluntarism Promotion (T40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Humane Society of Northeast Georgia (HSNEGA) works tirelessly to be a leader in creating a community known for responsible pet ownership and the humane treatment of animals, where animals are not abused or abandoned and where no healthy, treatable companion animal will be euthanized for lack of space or other resources.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Spay/Neuter Center

The Humane Society of Northeast Georgia's Spay/Neuter Center provides low-cost, high-quality surgery for all pet owners with no residency restrictions. Since opening in 2005, our team has performed 75,000+ surgeries for both owned, public animals as well as rescued animals from animal welfare organizations.

Population(s) Served

The Christian-David Healthy Pet Clinic at Humane Society of Northeast Georgia's offers low-cost vaccinations, wellness testing and prevention products for any public cats and dogs.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Rescue and rehoming of owner surrendered animals and animals abandoned at regional animal control facilities.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Rescue/Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Aa a private, selective admission facility, HSNEGA cannot legally take in strays under Georgia state law. Our intakes instead come from owner surrenders and transfers from other facilities.

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Rescue/Adoption

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Spay/Neuter Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our number of overall surgeries decreased 2015 to 2016 because we had 8 fewer days of surgery overall due to lack of relief veterinary assistance.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Humane Society of Northeast Georgia (HSNEGA) is a compassionate organization with a rich history spanning 100+ years. As the largest selective admission facility in northeast Georgia, we are creating a model facility based on a proactive vision to end animal neglect and suffering in our region through:

- providing access to affordable surgery and basic wellness services to encourage and assist pet owners in properly caring for their pets;
- rescuing neglected and abandoned companion animals and giving them a second chance;
- advocating for animal welfare issues that support responsible pet ownership and renounce abuse and neglect; and
- creating a community known for treating our people and pets with respect and compassion.

We will achieve this vision through building a strong infrastructure based on people, sound financial stewardship, and relationships with diverse stakeholders who share our passion for ensuring no healthy animal or willing pet owner lacks access to resources.

HSNEGA is building an animal welfare organization known for its compassion and respect for animals and people in the community we serve. Our strategies are:

1. Be the leader in creating a community known for responsible pet ownership through programs/services to help people and their pets stay together, and educating the public on appropriate standards for responsible pet ownership.
2. Be a model facility that goes beyond community expectations for an animal welfare center.
3. Be an organization with a robust organizational infrastructure with a broad volunteer base, exceptional staff, and an engaged board of directors based in a culture of respect, trust and accountability.
4. Be a financially sustainable organization that is able to continue and expand our mission and services for the long-term through fiscal responsibility and prudent management of all funds.

HSNEGA capabilities are staff, financial position, and planning. We have revamped our recruitment and retention plans to attract, reward, and retain top-quality talent that can have the skills and drive to forward the organization's goals. We have worked hard to improve our financial position and build long-term and short-term capital improvement funds, increase our salaries to a more competitive wage, and expand our ability to provide services. We recently completed a strategic planning exercise to give direction and focus to our growth over the next 3-5 years so we can best serve our clients in the most meaningful ways.

In FY2016, we increased our rescue/adoptions by 16.7% and rescued 170 more animals than the previous year. Our Wellness Clinic reach was up 13.5% overall with heartworm prevention becoming the biggest selling items (a result of our heartworm education efforts). We also expanded our ability to serve more "hard case" rescues including participating in a 400+ animal neglect/abuse case. Other improvements/additions in the last fiscal year include the purchase of a dental machine and the rebuild of our outside canine play area, now known as the Bark Park. In FY2017, we built out a dedicated space for our new Healthy Pet Clinic which includes three exam rooms, a larger waiting area, and clinical team workspace, allowing HSNEGA to increase our level of service. Future plans also include the ability to offer additional services such as affordable dental cleanings and heartworm treatment.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Within our Healthy Pet Clinic, we serve low-income people who would not otherwise be able to afford veterinarian care for their pets. In addition, we do not discriminate when matching animals to their potential adopters.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Suggestion box/email, Online (Google reviews, Facebook reviews, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We recently solicited feedback through a survey to better understand the demographics of our clients and how they are typically treated as low-income patrons. We have since decided to go to an appointment based clinic in order to not make people stand in line, no matter the weather, just to get an appointment for later in the day. We are also allowing walk-ins for those that don't have access to book an appointment online.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We have learned to listen to our clients instead of deciding for them what we think is best. This has created more trust with our clients.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Humane Society of Hall County
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Humane Society of Hall County

Board of directors
as of 3/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Chuck Keathley

Retired

Term: 2021 - 2023

Cindy Askounis

Jody Kelly

Marianne Thomas

Patrick Cisco

Allyson Reeves

Dale Herndon

David McGee

David Poroch

Denise Funk

Dee Provencial

Mike Guilday

Nicole Brokaw

Carole Ann Daniels

Marci Knauss

Anastasia Lin

Ed Schrader

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/23/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/13/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.