Youth Development

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta, Inc.

Together, we are Defenders of Potential.

Atlanta, GA   |  http://www.bbbsatl.org

Mission

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta is to create and support one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth.

Ruling year info

1962

President & CEO

Mr. Kwame Johnson

Main address

1382 Peachtree Street NE

Atlanta, GA 30309 USA

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EIN

58-0861895

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

More than half of the children we serve are concentrated in zip codes that have a high risk for factors including poverty, food insecurity and single-parent families. In 2017, 28% of the children in our 1:1 mentoring program lived in zip codes with very low child well-being scores and 32% lived in zip codes with low child well-being scores as defined by the United Way of Metro Atlanta Child Well-Being Index Measures. The Child Well-Being Index is based on a number of indicators including high school graduation rate, college and career readiness, and percentage of children under 18 living in poverty. Our community continues to struggle with persistent poverty, high rates of incarceration and lack of educational attainment for children living in some of Metro Atlanta’s most challenged neighborhoods. We believe that a child's zip code should not limit his/her potential. Research studies support the value of one-to-one mentoring, especially for young people with multiple risk factors.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community-Based Program

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters is to provide children facing adversity with strong and enduring, professionally supported one-to-one relationships that change their lives for the better, forever. We match children (Littles) between the ages of 6 and 18 with mentors (Bigs) who are at least age 21. When implemented following the Big Brothers Big Sisters model, which includes thorough screening of volunteers, in-depth interviews with children and parents, and professional support for the duration of the match, research has shown that one-to-one mentoring can have a profound effect on young people. The need for caring mentors in the lives of at-risk youth is apparent, and we have more than 500 children who are waiting to be matched with a Big Brother or Big Sister. Our Community-based program allows children and volunteers to participate in activities in the wider community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth (0-19 years)
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Where we work

Accreditations

U.S. Green Building Council 2013

Awards

National Large Agency of the Year 2012

BBBSA

Gold LEED Certification 2013

Green Building Certification Institute

Gold Standard Award for Quality 2013

BBBSA

Gold Standard Award for Quality 2014

BBBSA

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

K-12 (5-19 years),Minorities,At-risk youth

Related Program

Community-Based Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes the number of new matches made during the calendar year shown. All of our matches are one-to-one mentoring relationships between a child facing adversity and an adult volunteer.

Hours of mentoring

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

K-12 (5-19 years),Minorities,At-risk youth

Related Program

Community-Based Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We served 1,614 children in one-to-one mentoring matches in 2017. Each match is required to meet at least twice per month, spending an average of 8 hours per month together.

Percentage of program participants that increase their scholastic competency.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Minorities,At-risk youth

Related Program

Community-Based Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

94% of our program participants increase their scholastic competency, as measured by our youth outcomes survey.

Percentage of participants who are promoted to the next grade on time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Minorities,At-risk youth

Related Program

Community-Based Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For participants in our program, we use report cards and reporting from students, parents and mentors to access grade promotion.

Percentage of senior who graduate from high school on time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Minorities,At-risk youth

Related Program

Community-Based Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We track this metric through contacts with youth, parents and mentors.

Percentage of seniors who pursue post-secondary educational opportunities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Minorities,At-risk youth

Related Program

Community-Based Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We use reporting from youth, parents and mentors to track this metric. Post-secondary educational opportunities can include four-year and two-year colleges, as well as the military or trade school

Percentage of participants who do not become involved in the juvenile justice system

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Minorities,At-risk youth

Related Program

Community-Based Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For children active in our program, we track this metric through reporting from youth, mentors and parents. We also maintain relationships with juvenile court systems in our service area.

Number of months, on average, that a child and mentor are matched in our program.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth (0-19 years),Minorities,At-risk youth

Related Program

Community-Based Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We track length of time matched through our client management system. All parties of the match must make regular contact with our program staff and report appropriate activities to remain matched.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

We use research-based practices to develop relationships that leverage the power of volunteerism and create real change for the children and youth in our program. Our strategic plan, "Transforming Atlanta, One Child At A Time," covers the period 2018-2021. Our overarching goals include scaling impact, engaging the community, and innovating systems. The goals of the strategic plan by 2021: • Double the number of children served to 4,000 annually • Improve our brand awareness to reach more Bigs and donors • Better engage and support our families and volunteers through innovative technology • Expand services to help youth gain the education and training they need to successfully enter the workforce • Improve efficiency by reducing the cost per match by 35%

Scaling Impact: * Develop a robust academic and workforce development program to give Littles the resources needed to graduate from high school prepared for college or career. *Mentoring for Georgia Program: Continue and expand this program, which serves children at risk for involvement in the juvenile justice system in 26 counties in Georgia. *Westside Initiative -- Increase services to children on Atlanta's historic Westside Engage the Community: *Workplace Mentoring Program -- Create a site based-mentoring program with corporate partners that brings children from partner schools to corporate sites. *Marketing Enhancement -- Inspire more volunteers, donors and partners to become part of our mission through increased marketing *Volunteer Recruitment -- Expand volunteer recruitment staff Innovate Systems: Utilize technology to better communicate with and serve matches, through a new Customer Relations Management system, Volunteer Communications App and infrastructure improvements.

We have been serving children through one-to-one mentoring programs since 1960, so we have the expertise to deliver high-quality mentoring programs. We follow the Big Brothers Big Sisters of America model, which includes thorough screening of volunteers, in-depth interviews with children and parents, and professional support for the duration of the match, research has shown that one-to-one mentoring can have a profound effect on young people. Our goal is to take our proven, effective model and scale it to serve more children.

We have an agency scorecard, which allows us to track key indicators including number of children served, length of matches, quality of matches/impact on children, and financial stability and success. We regularly report on these factors to our board of directors and community. We evaluate our progress on the strategic plan and report that to the board and other stakeholders on a regular basis.

We are very proud of the outcomes our children and youth are able to achieve, at school and in the community. In 2019: • 98% were promoted to the next grade on time • 95% of our seniors graduated from high school on time • 87% of seniors went on to pursue postsecondary educational opportunities • 97% did not become involved in the juvenile justice system

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 2/7/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Peter Lauer

PEL Ventures

David Clark

Comcast

Richard Wells

KPMG

Amy Agami

Hertz Family Foundation

Julie Branicki

EY

Scott Brown

Georgia-Pacific

Richard Bundy

Genesis Career Group, Inc.

Kirk Erickson

Cigna

Gerard Gibbons

UPS

Michael Gillin

Ericcson

Sarah Stansberry

Equifax

Peter Lauer

PEL Ventures

Chanda Moran

Wells Fargo

Gregory Pope

Masters Capital

Tim Wilkerson

The Home Depot

Rita Breen

Georgia Power

Angela Blank

Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation

Burt Fealing

Southwire Company

Forrest McClain

Reicon Capital

Katherine Nichols

CARE

James Prospero

Salesforce

Ron Stewart

PRGX

Randall Tanner

Tanner, Ballew & Maloof, Inc.

Mark Tipton

IBERIA BANK

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/07/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Keywords

Mentoring, Big Brother, Big Sister