Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta, Inc.

Together, we are Defenders of Potential.

Atlanta, GA   |  http://www.bbbsatl.org

Mission

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta is to create and support one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth.

Ruling year info

1962

President & CEO

Mr. Kwame Johnson

Main address

P.O. Box 78215

Atlanta, GA 30357 USA

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EIN

58-0861895

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

More than half of the children we serve are concentrated in zip codes that have a high risk for factors including poverty, food insecurity and single-parent families. In 2019, 58% of the children in our 1:1 mentoring program lived in zip codes with very low or child well-being scores as defined by the United Way of Metro Atlanta Child Well-Being Index Measures. The Child Well-Being Index is based on a number of indicators including high school graduation rate, college and career readiness, and percentage of children under 18 living in poverty. Our community continues to struggle with persistent poverty, high rates of incarceration and lack of educational attainment for children living in some of Metro Atlanta’s most challenged neighborhoods. We believe that a child's zip code should not limit his/her potential. Research studies support the value of one-to-one mentoring, especially for young people with multiple risk factors.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community-Based Mentoring Program

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters is to create and support one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth. We match children (Littles) between the ages of 8 and 18 with mentors (Bigs) who are at least age 21. When implemented following the Big Brothers Big Sisters model, which includes thorough screening and training of volunteers, in-depth interviews with children and parents, and professional support for the duration of the match, research has shown that one-to-one mentoring can have a profound effect on young people. The need for caring mentors in the lives of at-risk youth is apparent, and we have more than 400 children who are waiting to be matched with a Big Brother or Big Sister. Our Community-based program allows children and volunteers to participate in activities in the wider community.

Population(s) Served

Our Site Based program is based on two models: 1:1 mentoring that takes place at specific schools, and our new Beyond School Walls program in which students meet with their mentors at the mentor’s workplace. In both models, Bigs and Littles follow a grade-specific curriculum facilitated by BBBS staff. Bigs, Littles and parents/guardians receive ongoing support from our staff following the same best practices we adhere to in our community-based mentoring program. In addition to the positive impact of the mentoring relationship, workplace mentoring provides young people in the program with exposure to a range of career options to reinforce the relevance and importance of doing well in school, and help them broaden their vision of what is possible for the future.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

U.S. Green Building Council 2013

Awards

National Large Agency of the Year 2012

BBBSA

Gold LEED Certification 2013

Green Building Certification Institute

Gold Standard Award for Quality 2013

BBBSA

Gold Standard Award for Quality 2014

BBBSA

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of mentors recruited

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community-Based Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes the number of new matches made during the calendar year shown. All of our matches are one-to-one mentoring relationships between a child facing adversity and an adult volunteer.

Percentage of participants who are promoted to the next grade on time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community-Based Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For participants in our program, we use reporting from students, parents and mentors to access grade promotion.

Percentage of seniors who graduate from high school on time

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community-Based Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We track this metric through contacts with youth, parents and mentors.

Percentage of seniors who pursue post-secondary educational opportunities or the military

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community-Based Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We use reporting from youth, parents and mentors to track this metric. Post-secondary educational opportunities can include four-year and two-year colleges, as well as the military or trade school

Percentage of participants who do not become involved in the juvenile justice system

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community-Based Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For children active in our program, we track this metric through reporting from youth, mentors and parents. We also maintain relationships with juvenile court systems in our service area.

Number of months, on average, that a child and mentor are matched in our program.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community-Based Mentoring Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We track length of time matched through our client management system. All parties of the match must make regular contact with our program staff and report appropriate activities to remain matched.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We use research-based practices to develop relationships that leverage the power of volunteerism and create real change for the children and youth in our program. Our strategic plan covers the period 2020-2024. Our overarching goals include are outlined below. Although some of our plans have been delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic, our long-term strategy remains the same.

• Serve more kids, grow to 1,700 by 2024
• Create and implement a new service delivery model
• Regionalize program services
• Expand the site-based program
• Serve specialized populations
• Increase training and support

The Board of Directors made the decision to sell our building at 1382 Peachtree Street so that we can use the proceeds to promote greater financial stability for the agency, have greater presence in the communities we serve, and invest in the program. In October 2020 we completed a sale contract agreement and anticipate closing on the building by January 27, 2021.

New service delivery model: With funding from a new capacity-building campaign, we will implement a new process that allows small teams of match coaches to work together to serve a defined area. Program participants will have more consistent contact throughout the process and also builds relationships with members of the regional team. Employees will have more variety in their job functions and work with a smaller number of program participants, so stronger relationships are built.

Regionalize program services: We envision having three satellite offices, in addition to our new headquarters office located in the West End of Atlanta, in place by 2024. This strategy works in conjunction with our new service delivery model to better serve our children and volunteers.

Expand the site based program: A key strategy for growth is the expansion of our site-based program. This program allows groups of volunteers, especially those from corporations, to participate in our program. Counselors and teachers recommend students for the program, which means that it reaches children who may not apply to our community-based program.

Serve specialized populations: Some of the young people who could benefit the most from mentoring are the hardest to serve. This includes youth who have been involved with the juvenile justices system, young people in foster care, those who have experienced trauma and LGBTQ youth. We are committed to expanding our ability to serve these young people by expanding our partnerships. These partnerships will require additional training for staff and volunteers, as well as partnership management. Although we anticipate that creating and sustaining these matches will be more costly than our average match, we are committed to expanding our capacity in this area. Our goal is to add two partnerships per year to address these needs.

Increase Training and DEI Support: Having increased resources for training is crucial to meeting the changing needs of our volunteers, children and staff. Mentoring brings together people of different backgrounds and it is crucial that we provide the training they need to create successful relationships. As a black-led nonprofit that typically serves 97% children of color, we have to be leaders in this conversation about racial equity. We are committed to becoming more intentional about this work.

We have been serving children through one-to-one mentoring programs since 1960, so we have the expertise to deliver high-quality mentoring programs. We follow the Big Brothers Big Sisters of America model, which includes thorough screening and training of volunteers, in-depth interviews with children and parents, and professional support for the duration of the match, research has shown that one-to-one mentoring can have a profound effect on young people.

Since 2018, BBBSA has been working to create a stronger foundation for smart and sustainable growth of our program through the following initiatives.

Marketing
Big Brothers Big Sisters of America implemented a rebranding in the fall of 2018, and we completed implementation of the campaign in the first quarter of 2019. Key results include:
• Huge increase in social media reach: Followers increased by 31%, Impressions by 259%, Engagement by 265% since 12/2018
• 165% increase in visitors to our fully rebranded website
• 70% of Volunteers who are matched in our program come from digital marketing efforts

Technology Investment
We moved from our outdated program database, as well as our donor and accounting software, to a customized Salesforce platform. We also made investments in our technology infrastructure. Key results include:
• 46% decrease in processing time for program participants from interview to Ready to Be Matched (RTBM) Stage
• 30% decrease in processing time from RTMB to Match
• Much greater ability to target specific areas for volunteer recruitment & results of volunteer recruitment campaigns, leading to a reduction of average wait time for kids to enter the program
• Easier to identify matches in the system through geo-targeting
• Infrastructure/licensing investments have allowed entire staff to work from home during COVID-19, while keeping network secure
• Development team has a more transparent, efficient and robust system; easier to collaborate with other departments

Investing in our Employees
We invested in professional development opportunities, hired a full-time HR manager and enhanced our quality assurance capacity.
• More professional development opportunities for staff have contributed to a significant decrease in turnover (down 21% in 2019)
• Development staff and CEO participated in Major Gifts Coaching Program to help build individual giving capacity
• Engaged quality assurance consultant to ensure best practices for our program staff by conducting independent QA Audits. Allows us to better evaluate and coach program staff to provide the best possible support for our program participants.

We are very proud of the outcomes our children and youth are able to achieve, at school and in the community. In 2020:
• 90% were promoted to the next grade on time
• 90% of our seniors graduated from high school on time
• 95% of graduating seniors went on to pursue postsecondary education or the military
• 99% did not become involved in the juvenile justice system

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metro Atlanta, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/29/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Peter Lauer

PEL Ventures


Board co-chair

Mr. Randall Tanner

Tanner, Ballew and Maloof

Richard Wells

KPMG

Amy Agami

Hertz Family Foundation

Julie Branicki

EY

Scott Brown

Georgia-Pacific

Gerard Gibbons

UPS

Peter Lauer

PEL Ventures

Gregory Pope

Masters Capital

Rita Breen

Georgia Power

Angela Blank

Community Volunteer

Forrest McClain

Reicon Capital

James Prospero

Salesforce

Ron Stewart

PRGX

Randall Tanner

Tanner, Ballew & Maloof, Inc.

Mark Tipton

IBERIA BANK

Terry Brantley

Brantland, LLC

Stuart Brown

Arby's Foundation

Juan Bueno

The Home Depot

Jennifer Burns

Equifax

Steven Koura

Sunrise Bluff Capital Group

Richard Makerson

BlueFletch

John Markwalter

CIBC Private Wealth Management

Sonya Nelson

WellCare Health Plans

Cody Partin

Cox Enterprises

Jerold Recht

JRi Solutions

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/29/2020,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/20/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.