Partnership Against Domestic Violence

PADV works passionately and tirelessly to end the crime of intimate partner violence and empower its survivors.

aka PADV   |   Atlanta, GA   |  www.padv.org

Mission

PThe mission of Partnership Against Domestic Violence (PADV) is to end the crime of intimate partner violence and empower its survivors; our vision is a community free of domestic violence. To that end we work to educate the public on the dynamics of intimate partner violence; promote healthy dating relationships among adolescents and teens to prevent future violence; offer safety and shelter for battered women and their children; restore power, self-sufficiency, and control to survivors; and create an effective and coordinated community response to intimate partner violence.

Ruling year info

1978

CEO & President

Ms. Nancy Friauf

Main address

P.O. Box 170225

Atlanta, GA 30317 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1314556

NTEE code info

Family Violence Shelters and Services (P43)

Hot Line, Crisis Intervention (F40)

Housing Rehabilitation (L25)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Partnership Against Domestic Violence is dedicated to addressing the crime of intimate partner violence for both individuals experiencing it as well as within the overall community

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Shelter for Women & Children

PADV's core program, Emergency Shelter for Women & Children offers 24-hour emergency shelter, 24-hour crisis line response, crisis stabilization support, case management, support groups and more. PADV's two emergency domestic violence (DV) shelters are the only state-certified DV shelters in the city of Atlanta and Gwinnett county. The program provides a safe haven for those fleeing domestic violence and offers shelter, basic necessities, food, clothing, support groups, case management and referrals for housing, childcare, mental/medical healthcare, transportation and job opportunities. Often the first link to safety, the crisis line provides safety planning, information, and support to callers in immediate danger, and to those with questions about people who may be battered. Additionally, the crisis line offers referrals to community resources available throughout the state of Georgia.

Population(s) Served
Families

PADV provides and array of community based services for survivors who may not need shelter but do need support to escape a violent relationship and remain violence-free. Services include case-management, advocacy, public benefits assessment and assistance, support groups and referrals for housing, childcare, mental/medical healthcare, transportation and job opportunities. Support groups are offered across metro Atlanta and provide a safe place for women who have left violent relationships or who continue to live with their abuser to come together and share experiences, offer encouragement, support, and generate ideas on ways to live violence free. As part of case management, program staff interview and assess domestic violence survivors for eligibility for TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) and provide service coordination. Domestic violence survivors receive a temporary waiver from certain TANF requierments without losing financial assistance.

Population(s) Served
Adults

PADV's Supportive Housing PRogram is designed to assist battered women in their efforts to gain independence from their abusers. Specifically, the program offers up to two years of housing for women  and their children who exited emergency shelter, are maintaining safety from the abuser, and are working towards their goals of self-sufficiency. The program offers not only rental assistence, but also education/job training, financial assistanc, utility assistanc, legal advocacy, case management, support groups and regerrals for housing, childcare, mental/medical healthcare, transportation and job opportunities. Participants pay 30% of their income to an escrow account, which is given back to them upon program exit for deposit on permanent housing or other needs.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Partnering with local schools, PADV  implements a teen dating violence curriculum that increases their knowledge of non-violence conflict resolution, communication, and problem solving skills.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents

Where we work

Awards

Managing for Excellence 2010

The Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta

Top Rated Women's Non-profit 2011

Great Non-profits.org

4-Star Charity 2020

Charity Navigator

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of nights of safe housing provided to families of domestic violence

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships, Ethnic and racial groups, Age groups, Social and economic status

Related Program

Emergency Shelter for Women & Children

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes shelter nights provided to adults and their children at both of our domestic violence shelters.

Number of crisis hotline calls answered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Ethnic and racial groups, Family relationships, Social and economic status

Related Program

Community-Based Domestic Violence Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of emergency meals provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Emergency Shelter for Women & Children

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of domestic violence victims served through legal advocacy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community-Based Domestic Violence Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goal of PADV is to end the crime of intimate partner violence and empower its survivors.

24 hour crisis line, emergency shelter services, legal advocacy, long-term supportive housing in community based apartments, individual and group counseling, case management, financial assistance, community education, services to youth and youth serving adults to address teen dating violence, outreach to the law enforcement community to create more survivor focused and effective law enforcement interventions, outreach to men to involve them more in the work against domestic violence.

Forty-two years of service provision, a strong and committed board and staff, excellent reputation in the community, effective partnerships, a multi-stream funding source.

In 2018, served 14,952 in direct services, 26,865 in community education and outreach,
Next major goal is building a new facility for our Fulton shelter to increase capacity and create a more therapeutic living environment.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Survivors of domestic violence and their children, teens that have experienced dating violence, the community at large for domestic violence prevention and intervention services.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We were providing financial management and credit management classes for residential clients. Attendance and interest was low. Clients stated they felt they were being told what they were doing wrong. We adopted a new program where Habitat for Humanity does a 12 week course on home ownership and how to get there. People that go through the program have the opportunity to be a family for whom a house is built by Habitat for Humanity. We are now providing practical skills with a tangible positive benefit.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Has helped people have more ownership of the services. Provides them with a better sense of why we do what we do and why we do it the way we do. Facilitates them feeling more invested in their own service delivery, and that they are contributing to the organization.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Partnership Against Domestic Violence
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Partnership Against Domestic Violence

Board of directors
as of 3/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Dr. Constance Dierickx

CD Consulting

Term: 2019 - 2021


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Dr. Tameeka Law Walker

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Katie Barton

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Robyn Farmer

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Nina Gupta

Nelson Mullins

Pallavi Gor

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Meimi Hartman

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Carey Herron

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Dante Jackson

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Ashli Kennedy

Investment Research and Advisory Group

Charlotte Starfire

Bank of America

Laura Vickery

Vickery Law Firm

Kauser Kenning

Morgan Stanley

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/19/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.