Fayetteville Urban Ministry, Inc.

"Showing God's compassion for our neighbors in need, and thus building our community together."

Fayetteville, NC   |  https://www.fayurbmin.org

Mission

Showing God's compassion for our neighbors in need, and thus building our community together.

Ruling year info

1979

Executive Director

Mr. Johnny L. Wilson

Operations Manager

Ms. Patricia Jackson

Main address

PO Box 1171

Fayetteville, NC 28302 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1354139

NTEE code info

Adult, Continuing Education (B60)

Delinquency Prevention (I21)

Home Improvement/Repairs (L81)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

For over 40 years the mission of Fayetteville Urban Ministry, Inc. has been "to show God's compassion for our neighbors in need, and thus build our community together." We pursue this mission by way of our 4 programs that exist to address and mitigate: clothing & food insecurity (Emergency Assistance Program), illiteracy & adult education (Adult Literacy & Education Center), at-risk & court involved youth (Find-A-Friend), and elderly & low-income home-ownership (Nehemiah Project). Collectively, these 4 programs will provide faith, hope, love, and security to over 10,000 Cumberland County residents every year, 100% free of charge. For every dollar we receive, 91 cents invested directly into our programs.

For more information, visit www.fayurbmin.org

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adult Literacy & Education Center

The Adult Literacy & Education Center was established in 1976 to address the nearly a quarter of the adults in Cumberland County who read at or below a 5th grade level and assists adults who are challenged in the areas of reading, writing, math, general academics, English language, job readiness and computer skills. One-on-one tutors, group classes and a full computer lab help students to begin their journey to success. These services will affect not only the adult student, but also their children and generations thereafter. It is fundamental for creating better health care access, lowering crime rates, and ensuring safer family environments. Last year, trained volunteers from the community worked with 244 adult students, touching 741 lives. In addition, 6 students gained U.S. citizenship, and 103 attained their educational or employment goals. The gift of literacy is one that will make a lasting difference in our entire community. “Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.” Frederick Douglass

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

FUM came into existence in 1974 to address the widespread needs of people suffering in crisis situations throughout the county. Starting from a basement, Emergency Assistance grew into an effective grass roots operation that touches thousands of lives. Now the program houses a food pantry, clothing closet, and a financial assistance service for families and individuals in crisis. All of this is made possible by community partners who donate non-perishable food items, new & lightly used clothing, hygiene items, household goods, and money. In fiscal year 2014-15, we served more than 8,000 people, over 500 homeless, and 632 military-affiliated lives. “It is simply amazing what a bag of groceries, clothing, or a few dollars can do to transform a life story!”

Population(s) Served
Families
Homeless people

The FAF program began in 1982 as one of the first mentoring programs established by Governor Hunt in North Carolina. Since then, it has flourished and added multiple afterschool components to keep at-risk youth fully motivated and enriched through wrap-around support services. Our program helps modify youths’ behavior positively at school, home, and in the community. The FAF program was named a “Champion for Children” in 2009 by the Child Advocacy Center. Serving over 200 at-risk and court-involved youth per year, with a 96% success rate at keeping kids out of trouble and successful in school, this program truly makes an impact. It costs tax payers over $125,000 per year to house 1 juvenile in confinement. It takes less than $1,500 to sponsor a youth for 1 full year of preventive services with FAF. “Our kids are our most valuable investment!”

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Non-adult children

We started in August of 1993, repairing the homes of low-income home owners with the help of volunteer groups from local churches. In 1994 the program assumed the Emergency Home Repair Program for the Community Development Department, City of Fayetteville. Nehemiah partners with many contractors, the Re-Store Warehouse, and other agencies as a vital resource for this community’s elderly and low-income population. This program’s impact is invaluable as it ensures that our low-income home owners are housed in safe and comfortable living conditions. Each year, the program will assist approximately 170-200 home owners. Imagine being on a fixed or low income and facing the crisis of costly home repairs. “We build up homes and families by repairing houses!”

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Seniors

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Emergency Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Work status and occupations, Social and economic status

Related Program

Adult Literacy & Education Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Social and economic status

Related Program

Find-A-Friend Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of youth participating in our Find-a-Friend program that provides youth mentoring, after school programs, and group sessions.

Number of homes repaired for low-income home owners.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Nehemiah Project

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of homes repaired 100% free of charge for low-income home owners within the Fayetteville city limits. Many of these clients are elderly.

Number of low-income households who have received utilities assistance to keep the lights, heat and/or water on in their homes and/or assisted with rent or mortgage to avoid eviction.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status

Related Program

Emergency Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 we were able to help 170 clients affected by COVID-19 with $191,400 in rent and/or utility assistance. Many of these clients had lost a job or had hours cut due to COVID-19.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Fayetteville Urban Ministry's vision is to continuously brand our name, works and mission throughout each community and neighborhood in Cumberland County through services, assistance, partnerships and donor support. We wish to further the ideal of a community of compassion committed to the well being of our neighbors in need.

By building on existing programs and bolstering proven methodologies we believe that we can improve our ability to serve our community, year after year, no matter what comes our way. We seek out new grants to address issues both new and old, such as bullying in the "Spy Kids" facet of our Find-A-Friend Program. We use newly acquired and donated technologies, such as Smart TVs, to host tax training and assistance classes for the elderly. We are constantly seeking to improve our ability to provide the aid and services most needed by those less fortunate. In 2020, we worked with our city and county governments to secure grant funding to provide relief to area residents struggling to pay rent and/or utility bills due to COVID-19.

Like many other non-profits, grants, endowments, and donations of many kinds are what allow us to do what we do. Our rate of investment into our programs, 93% of every dollar we receive, clearly shows that we know how to make best use of the support we're given. It also evidence of a staff whose motivations stem from a paradigm of altruism and a sincere desire to give back. With this in tow, our organization is capable of achieving any goal we put forward and overcome any obstacle placed in front of us. Our staff is constantly receiving new training and implementing new strategies while honing proven ones in an effort to provide the kind of service and results one might expect from a large, national organization.

The labor and love of over 40 years of community involvement has produced a tried and true local non-profit organization that has been recognized on a State level worth and trustworthy cause. Our most recent goal was the Build the Dream Campaign -a fundraising endeavor to fully fund and build Fayetteville's first-ever Youth Enrichment Center to house our growing Find-A-Friend Youth Mentoring Program. This building has been completed and fully-funded. It is located directly across the street from our home office and serves as a beacon for youth development and growth in our community. Even in the era of COVID-19 and virtual/distance learning, our Find-A-Friend team has still been able to pick up youth at their homes (rather than school pick ups) to participate in afterschool programs, mentoring, etc. here on campus.

Financials

Fayetteville Urban Ministry, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Fayetteville Urban Ministry, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 1/29/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mrs. Pat Talkington

Melanie Kosterman

Cumberland County Schools

Steve Satisky

Pat Talkington

Cumulus Broadcasting

Alice Bull

Pat Chabra

Linda Goff

Morgan Stanley

Richard Alligood

Jeff Spangler

US Army Chaplains Corp.

Joe Quigg

Ed's Tire

Sandee Gronowski

PNC Bank

Phyllis Jones

Cumberland County Courts

Muhammad Bilal

Shadow Protective Services

Billy Buckner

Methodist University at Fort Bragg

Kitti Jo Finch

CenturyLink

Jennifer Fincher

Jennifer Kirby Fincher, PLLC

Victoria Huggins

Fayetteville Woodpeckers

Michael Mills

Pharmvite LLC

Sheena Percival

Woodforest Bank

Tehra Thornton

Fusion Salon

Tisha Waddell

Tisha S. Waddell Coaching & Consultations

Kevin Wester

Destiny Real Estate

Darry Whitaker

Fayetteville Police Department (Retired)

Ann Marie Ziegler

Array Magazine

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/05/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/05/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.