GOLD2023

Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee

Hunger Has No Season

aka SHFB-ET   |   Maryville, TN   |  www.secondharvestetn.org

Mission

Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee leads the community in the fight to end hunger. Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee, a member of Feeding America, has worked to compassionately feed the hungry since 1982. In FY20, Second Harvest distributed 21 million pounds of food across 18 East Tennessee counties. Through feeding programs and 630+ nonprofit partners, Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee provides food to more than 134,000 children, adults and seniors each month. For more information, please visit secondharvestetn.org.

Ruling year info

1981

Executive Director

Elaine Streno

Main address

136 Harvest Lane

Maryville, TN 37801 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1450139

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee, a member of Feeding America, has worked to compassionately combat hunger and address hunger at its root cause. Through various feeding programs, Second Harvest works to feed our neighbors experiencing hunger and provide them with educational resources to set them up for success. More than 200,000 East Tennesseans are currently experiencing food insecurity and Second Harvest aims to provide access to nutritious food to all that need it.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Food Rescue

Food waste continues to be a problem in the United States. According to Feeding America, “72 billion pounds of food goes to waste while 37 million Americans struggle with hunger.”

The Food Rescue program rescues some food and other types of donated goods to prevent waste. Second Harvest Food Bank partners with food manufacturers, grocery stores, restaurants, and farmers. These partners help prevent food waste and rescue surplus foods. These foods help feed people experiencing hunger.

Donated goods include day-old baked goods, dairy approaching expiration, bruised fruits, and vegetables and perishable goods with damaged packaging. A refrigerated truck picks up and transports the food. Once picked up, the driver delivers the food directly to an agency. Partner agencies include food pantries, shelters, senior housing facilities, etc. Food Rescue saves organizations thousands of dollars a month.

Because of Food Rescue, agencies expand their resources and provide better service to the clients they serve. Some organizations, rely exclusively on Food Rescue as their only food source. The people who receive food from this program get high-quality, fresh, nutritious foods.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people
Age groups
At-risk youth

The Food Sourcing program offers free, discount and purchased products to nonprofit agency partners. Product offerings include canned, packaged, frozen and fresh goods. Agency partners utilizing Food Sourcing order online and pick up products directly from the warehouse. On average, Second Harvest provides East Tennessee pantries with more than 75% of the food they distribute to the hungry.

Food Sourcing offerings include:
-USDA Government Commodities: Products free for agencies that meet government requirements and fill out the mandatory paperwork
-Free Products: Time-sensitive, mass bulk, damaged and seasonal products often offered at no fee. In fact, more than half of the food, Second Harvest offers partner agencies is free.
Discounted Products: Generally canned or cased items offered to partner agencies for a small fee to help cover logistics
-Purchased Products: Purchased staple items requested by partner agencies. Partner agencies’ requests are pooled and items are purchased in bulk, and often, at an additional discounted rate. Partner agencies benefit from hundreds of purchasing relationships Second Harvest has locally and nationally.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

Food for Kids is a collaboration between Second Harvest and public schools within the food bank’s 18-county service area. The program provides healthy, easily-prepared food to some of the most vulnerable children in our community. These vulnerable children likely miss meals on a regular basis. Teachers at each school compile a list of students in their classroom who may be at risk of hunger to receive food from the program.
Food for Kids by the Numbers:

18—the current number of counties in which the program operates
280—the current number of participating schools
13,000+—the current number of children benefitting from the program
1,200,000+—the number of meals provided by Food for Kids this year
$100—average cost per child to provide healthy food each week for a full school year
$0—the cost to the schools/children receiving Food for Kids food

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Many people in rural communities go to their local church or community food pantry for a meal from time-to-time. Partner agencies utilize Second Harvest as a source for food. However, they often do not have funds or equipment to travel to the warehouse to pick up food. Agencies need this food to serve the hungry in the area. Rural Route helps solve this problem. By delivering supplies directly to rural food pantries, Rural Route helps. At least three days a week, Second Harvest loads a truck with food at the warehouse. Once loaded, the truck travels a scheduled route delivering food. Dozens of nonprofits receive this food to serve the hungry in their area. You can help Second Harvest supply rural community nonprofit partners with the food they need to feed the hungry in all corners of East Tennessee.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Nonprofit organizations, like food pantries, partner with Second Harvest in a combined effort to serve East Tennesseans facing food insecurity. Unfortunately, in some areas of East Tennessee, there simply are no food pantries to partner with. The goal of the Mobile Pantry is to reach the hungry in their own community, even when infrastructure is lacking. Mobile Pantries are mobile, temporary food pantries. Second Harvest loads a tractor-trailer with food and delivers it to a location that can accommodate distribution. Volunteers from local/sponsoring organizations unload the trailer and repackage the food. In 2019, through Mobile Pantry, more than 1.8 million pounds of food were distributed.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Senior Outreach program is a partnership between Second Harvest and East Tennessee nonprofits that serve the elderly. Seniors are disproportionately at risk of hunger compared to other age groups. In a recent senior survey, more than 30% reported having to choose between buying groceries and buying medicine within the last month; 25% reported choosing between paying rent and going grocery shopping. The food bank provides emergency and supplemental food to seniors across 18 counties. Many of the seniors who receive food are shut-ins or residents of a group or special needs homes. Senior Outreach currently serves 1,000 seniors each month in 15 counties.

Population(s) Served
Seniors

Through the Nutrition Access Program, Second Harvest improves access to healthy food and provides education on nutrition. This program aims to increase nutritious food through the Fresh Pantry. This program, combined with education, empower people to make healthier food choices.

ACCESS

Due to “food deserts,” families struggle to access healthy food. According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, a food desert is “an area where little fresh produce is available for sale”. The first step in healthier food is increasing access. The Fresh Pantry Program provides families the ability to choose healthier foods. The truck’s design focuses on distributing healthy food. You will find fresh produce, canned fruits and vegetables, eggs, milk and healthy proteins at a Fresh Pantry.

EDUCATION

Nutrition Access Program equips school teachers, children and families with resources to understand and value healthy food choices. The nutrition education resources shared include cooking demonstration videos, healthy recipes and tips for strengthening kitchen and cooking skills. Second Harvest offers personal, classroom-style instruction to agencies serving students and families interested in a hands-on educational experience.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

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School Pantries are a collaborative effort between Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee, community partners who provide volunteers, and an ever-increasing number of public schools within the food bank’s 18-county service area. This program operates in counties and schools where the need for food is greatest, where the percentage of students at an economic disadvantage is the highest, and where students and their families are underserved through other programs. These pantries impact some of the most vulnerable children in our communities – children who may be missing meals regularly.

School Pantries are located on school property, and food distributions take place each month on a set day and time. School Pantries provide children and their families with staple items. These items help them stretch their monthly food budgets. The program follows a client choice model, allowing families to make positive choices with confidence. Confidence helps them move towards self-sufficiency.

School Pantries by the Numbers:

12—the current number of counties in which the program operates
12—the current number of participating schools
6—number of counties that do not have a School Pantry within our 18-county service area
5,800—the number of families benefiting from School Pantries
200,833—the number of meals provided by School Pantries in the 2019-20 school year
$15—average cost per family to provide a healthy food box once/month for a full year
50—the average number of families served by a single School Pantry each month
241,000—the pounds of food delivered to School Pantries in the 2019-20 school year
$0—the cost to the schools/families and children receiving School Pantry food

Population(s) Served
Families
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

"Be More Awards" 2011

Home Federal and PBS

American Institute of Bakers 2016

Accreditation

Affiliations & memberships

Feeding America 1983

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Second Harvest Food Bank is engaging our community in the fight to end hunger by providing the right type of food to East Tennesseans experiencing hunger. Our goal is to shift the food banking model to focus on nutritious but cost-effective foods, like whole grain cereals, dried beans, dried rice and fresh foods like produce from local farms and day-old/non-sale foods from local grocers. Second Harvest currently has an inventory mix of over 59% of the most nutritious products and is reaching 3/4th of the hungry in our community. Over the next 5 years we are working to increase the amount of food distributed by an additional 1 million pounds of quality product. At that level, we would have the supplies, logistics and product-mix to meet the challenge of hunger for all demographic segments in each geographic region of East Tennessee.

Expanding relationships with local farms to source new fresh-food product donations. \r\nAggressively seeking financial backing from regional corporate leaders to enable Second Harvest to purchase an additional one million pounds of product annually. \r\nEstablish new partners in the few geographic regions of East Tennessee currently underserved in our distribution model.

Second Harvest is recognized as the leading entity in East Tennessee in the fight to eliminate local hunger. Over 320 non-profits and 259 schools throughout 18 counties depend on the food bank and understand the value that the food bank brings to the region. Our board, staff, and various volunteer committees have taken on the challenge of expanding the food bank's donor base (particularly corporate donors) to meet the financial challenges associated with sourcing another million pounds of quality product. \r\n\r\nCentral to our ability to expand services to accomplish the mission is our 86,000 sq ft distribution facility -- acquired and fully financed through a successful capital campaign ending in 2015. This new facility enables mass-bulk purchases of product which yield significant cost savings and affords storage space enabling opportunity purchases that would be overlooked without ample storage space.

We continue to transition toward a more healthy inventory mix and are now limiting donations of specific types of unhealthy product, namely snack foods and sugary beverages. While this originally lead to a decrease in overall pounds of food available to serve the hungry, we have increased purchasing to augment food needed to fulfill our agencies orders. Although that is a costly strategy, it has positively impacted the overall percent of our distributed inventory that is considered to be healthy. \r\n\r\nThrough our Healthy Food Initiative started in 2013, we have increased the percentage of "green" food -- those foods of the highest nutritional value, such as proteins, fresh fruit and vegetables, and multi-grain products by over 24% in the past four years. This represents 1.1 million additional pounds of the most nutritious food distributed in calendar year 2016 over the distribution of green products in 2012.\r\n\r\nSecond Harvest is now distributing an average of 86.2 meals per person living in poverty across the 18 counties of our service area per year, 23% over the goal of 70 meals per person in need established in 2015 by Feeding America. With a goal of 70 meals/person in EACH of our 18 counties as our ultimate goal, we have the elimination of hunger in East Tennessee within sight.

Financials

Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee

Board of directors
as of 07/06/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Jacob Ogle

Five Oaks Development Group


Board co-chair

Patrick Birmingham

Covenant Health

Jacob Ogle

Patrick Birmingham

Lori Hickock

Bob Haralson

David Reynolds

Drew Everett

Dean John Ross

David Keim

David Owens

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/6/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data