SILVER2021

The Carter Center, Inc.

Waging Peace. Fighting Disease. Building Hope.

aka The Carter Center   |   Atlanta, GA   |  https://www.cartercenter.org

Mission

The Carter Center is fundamentally committed to human rights and the alleviation of human suffering. It seeks to prevent and resolve conflicts, enhance freedom and democracy, and improve health. The Center: • emphasizes action and measurable results. It is prepared to take timely action on important and pressing issues. • seeks to break new ground and not duplicate the effective efforts of others. • addresses difficult problems in difficult situations and recognizes failure as an acceptable risk. • is nonpartisan, actively seeks complementary partnerships and works collaboratively with other organizations from the highest levels of government to local communities. • believes that people can improve their own lives when provided with the necessary skills, knowledge and access to resources.

Ruling year info

1982

Chief Executive Officer

Paige Alexander

Main address

One Copenhill 453 John Lewis Freedom Parkway NE

Atlanta, GA 30307 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1454716

NTEE code info

International Human Rights (Q70)

Diseases, Disorders, Medical Disciplines N.E.C. (G99)

Education N.E.C. (B99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Since 1982, The Carter Center has been fundamentally committed to human rights and the alleviation of human suffering. It seeks to prevent and resolve conflicts, enhance freedom and democracy, and improve health. The Center is a pioneer and leader in election observation, conflict resolution, global access to information, and human rights. It supports human rights activists at the grassroots, while working to advance human rights laws that uphold the dignity and worth of each citizen. The Center also fights to control, eradicate, and eliminate six preventable neglected tropical diseases (Guinea worm, river blindness, trachoma, schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, and malaria) through strong partnerships with ministries of health and community initiatives. The Center advocates for mental health care policy reform, strives to achieve equity for mental health care comparable to other health care, and works to reduce stigma and discrimination against those with mental illnesses.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

China Program (Peace)

President Carter's decision to normalize the relationship between the United States and the People's Republic of China in 1979 changed China, the United States, and the world. The Carter Center's China Program is dedicated to preserving this legacy and advancing U.S.-China relations by building synergy between China and the United States on issues of global importance, including fostering greater cooperation between them in other nations, providing resources and scholarship, and nurturing the next generation of young leaders who can shape the critical U.S.-China bilateral relationship to be a cornerstone of global peace and prosperity.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Carter Center works to build sustainable peace in emerging democracies and to prevent and resolve conflicts.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Carter Center works globally to advance democratic elections and governance consistent with universal human rights.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Carter Center's Global Access to Information (ATI) Program works in partnership with governments, civil society, and international and regional bodies to improve governance and transform lives through a meaningful right of access to information.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Carter Center undertakes activities to support individuals and nations striving to realize the civil and political rights and responsibilities enumerated by the U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights and a growing body of public international law.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Latin America and Caribbean Program works to enhance the quality of democracy in the region and make it more accountable to citizens. Projects aim to strengthen regional capacities to promote democracy, transform and prevent conflicts, and improve democratic governance.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Since 1986, The Carter Center has led the international campaign to eradicate Guinea worm disease, working closely with ministries of health and local communities, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, UNICEF, and many others.

Guinea worm disease is set to become the second human disease in history, after smallpox, to be eradicated. It will be the first parasitic disease to be eradicated and the first disease to be eradicated without the use of a vaccine or medicine.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Carter Center currently works with national ministries of health to eliminate the debilitating parasitic disease of lymphatic filariasis - a leading cause of permanent and long-term disability worldwide - from areas of Ethiopia, Nigeria, and the island of Hispaniola.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Under the leadership of former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, a long-standing champion for the rights of people with mental illnesses, the Carter Center's Mental Health Program works to promote awareness about mental health issues, inform public policy, achieve equity for mental health care comparable to other health care, and reduce stigma and discrimination against those with mental illnesses.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Carter Center works with national ministries of health in Latin America and Africa to eliminate river blindness, one of the leading causes of preventable blindness worldwide.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Carter Center strives to do the following:

• eradicate the parasitic infection Guinea worm disease, set to become the second human disease in history to be eradicated, the first parasitic disease to be eradicated, and the first disease to be eradicated without the use of a vaccine or medicine;

• partner with national ministries of health to eliminate the parasitic disease of lymphatic filariasis - a leading cause of permanent and long-term disability - as well as river blindness and trachoma, two of the leading causes of preventable blindness globally;

• reduce stigma and discrimination against people living with mental health and substance use conditions;

• advance access to information in an effort to increase accountability and transparency, improve governance, and give citizens a meaningful voice; and

• build sustainable peace in emerging democracies, to prevent and resolve conflicts, and to advance democratic elections and governance consistent with universal human rights.

The Carter Center fights preventable diseases by using health education and simple, low-cost methods, bringing under-resourced countries better disease surveillance and health care delivery systems. Because these communities are often burdened by several diseases at once, the Center uses a new public health approach to efficiently treat multiple diseases at once.

The Center has also become a leader in the field of election observation, monitoring more than 100 national elections to help ensure that the results reflect the will of the people. We seek to deepen democracy by nurturing full citizen participation in public policy-making and by helping to establish government institutions that bolster the rule of law, fair administration of justice, access to information, and government transparency.

The Carter Center helps people acquire the tools, knowledge, and resources they need to transform their own lives, building a more peaceful and healthier world for future generations.

1. Dedicated staff. The Carter Center has nearly 1,000 dedicated and passionate staff members working at the Atlanta headquarters and in the field across multiple continents, training and empowering people to resolve their own challenges.

2. Grassroots program ownership. The Carter Center relies on community volunteers to distribute health education materials and vital medications to their families and neighbors. With the Center’s assistance, civil society groups learn how to procure information from their governments. We convene human rights defenders from around the world to share their experiences with one another. And, the Center assembles journalists in the United States and abroad trained on responsible mental health reporting.

3. Corporate and institutional partnerships. The Center builds partnerships for change among international agencies, governments, nongovernmental organizations, corporations, and national ministries of health. Several companies have made substantial long-term commitments to provide medications, water filters, laboratory equipment, and other products essential to the success and progress of our health work, while numerous foundations and agencies provide significant financial support year after year.

Accomplishments to Date:

• Incidences of Guinea worm disease have been reduced from an estimated 3.5 million in 1986 to 28 in 2018, making it likely to be the first human disease since smallpox to be eradicated.

• The Center, alongside its ministry of health partners, distributed more than 240 million treatments of ivermectin in Africa and Latin America. With these treatments, the Center has eliminated transmission of river blindness in 11 foci of the 13 endemic areas in the Americas, and has also interrupted transmission of both river blindness and trachoma in Nigeria’s Plateau and Nasarawa states, halting mass drug administration (MDA) in 2018, and making it the largest stop-MDA decision in the Center’s history.

• In 2017, The Center supported 103,262 corrective eyelid surgeries. Since 1999, The Center has assisted national programs in completing 784,736 surgeries in total.

• The Center has established a village-based health care delivery system in thousands of communities in Africa with trained health care personnel and volunteers to distribute drugs and provide health education.

• The Carter Center has made significant strides in national policy change surrounding mental health care and diminishing the stigma against people with mental illnesses.

• Working with the Liberian government, the Center has helped to create a corps of over 200 locally trained and credentialed mental health clinicians now serving all 15 counties in the country, 42 of whom have a specialty in children and adolescents.

• Since the Rosalynn Carter Fellowships for Mental Health Journalism were established in 1996, fellows have produced more than 1,500 stories, documentaries, books, and other works during and after their fellowship year.

• The Center has observed more than 100 elections in 39 countries to help establish and strengthen democracies and give all citizens a voice.

• Since its founding in 1982, the Center has strengthened avenues to peace in Ethiopia, Eritrea, Liberia, Sudan, South Sudan, Uganda, the Korean Peninsula, Haiti, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and the Middle East.

• For more than 30 years, President and Mrs. Carter have personally supported thousands of human rights defenders by appealing through letters or in private meetings to heads of state on behalf of those who are persecuted for their courageous work.

Financials

The Carter Center, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Carter Center, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 09/15/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jason Carter

Bondurant, Mixson & Elmore, LLP

Term: 2015 -

Jimmy Carter

Rosalynn Carter

Kathryn E. Cade

Rosalynn Carter Institute for Caregiving

Terrence B. Adamson

National Geographic Society

Arthur M. Blank

Atlanta Falcons

Richard C. Blum

Blum Capital Partners

Reuben E. Brigety II

The George Washington University

Susan A. Cahoon

Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP

Gordon D. Giffin

Dentons US LLP

Ben F. Johnson III

Alston & Bird

Sherry Lansing

The Sherry Lansing Foundation

Douglas W. Nelson

Annie E. Casey Foundation

Wendell S. Reilly

Grapevine Partners

Marjorie M. Scardino

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Leah Ward Sears

Smith, Gambrell & Russell

D. Douglas Shipman

Woodruff Arts Center

Hugo X. Shong

IDG Capital Partners

Claire E. Sterk

Emory University

Chilton D. Varner

King & Spalding, LLP

Gregory J. Vaughn

Spencer Stuart

Ellen H. Yankellow

Correct Rx Pharmacy Services, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes