North Carolina Coastal Federation, Inc.

Working Together for a Healthy Coast

aka Coastal Federation   |   Newport, NC   |  www.nccoast.org

Mission

Since 1982, the North Carolina Coastal Federation has worked to protect and restore the coastal water quality and habitats of the N.C. coast through education, advocacy, and habitat preservation and restoration. We engage coastal residents and visitors in the protection of our coast for current and future generations.

Ruling year info

1983

Executive Director

Mr. Todd Miller

Main address

3609 Hwy 24 (Ocean)

Newport, NC 28570 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1494098

NTEE code info

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

North Carolina has one of the most spectacular and productive coastlines in the world. Our vision at the Coastal Federation is to keep it that way, so that it always remains a great place to live, visit, work and play. People are drawn to our region by its people, economy and natural resources. North Carolina is now our country’s ninth-most populated state, and one of the fastest growing. With more people comes more enthusiasm for our coast — and also additional pressure on our natural resources. Our coast is also threatened by increasingly strong and more frequent storms that damage our natural resources and impact our communities. The loss of important habitat and degradation of water quality impact the health of our coastal system, as well as the people and businesses that depend on it, from fishing to tourism. The Coastal Federation’s work to protect and restore our coast grows more vital with every passing year. Thank you for sharing our vision.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Core Program Areas

Founded in 1982, the Coastal Federation is an environmental nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization working to protect and restore the North Carolina coast. The federation works at the community level in all 20 coastal counties through regional offices in Wrightsville Beach and Wanchese and our headquarters in Newport. The federation engages its members, the public, and community leaders in active stewardship of our coast through hands-on restoration of coastal habitats, education programs for students and adults, and advocacy initiatives. Our vision is to ensure a natural, beautiful and productive coast that is a great place to live, work and visit.


Our educators work connect over 5,000 students and 10,000 adults to our coast through a variety of programs. Adult programming included speaker series, community forums, continuing education workshops, coastal cruises, and more. Learning opportunities for students included classroom activities such as dissections and stormwater lessons as well as field exercises including ecosystem monitoring, rain garden design, construction, and planting, and more.


Our habitat restoration program focuses on wetland and oyster habitat restoration- habitats that form the foundation of the ecosystem, support marine life, and improve water quality. Projects included large-scale wetland restoration to restore the natural hydrology of our coast, and oyster and wetland restoration projects up and down the coast. This includes our 50 Million Oyster Initiative, which will restore 50 acres of oysters by 2020. We also worked to restore water quality by reducing the volume of polluted stormwater runoff reaching our coastal waters.


Our advocacy program works to promote sound management of our coastal resources, including environmentally friendly development techniques, compatible industry, and training programs for community leaders and professionals. Our advocacy efforts start at the community level, responding to breaking local issues such GenX in Wilmington, and include state and federal advocacy to guide policy and programs to insure a healthy coast for the future.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of acres of land protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Core Program Areas

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total Acres of land protected by conservation easements as of 2021

Acres of natural habitat restored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Core Program Areas

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

3,000 acres of wetland restored in 2021 5 acres of oyster reef restored in 2021

Total pounds of debris collected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Core Program Areas

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of students educated through field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Core Program Areas

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes all hands-on student education programming. In-person education programs were impacted by COVID.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Core Program Areas

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

The federation typical engages over 1,000 volunteers annually. Volunteer events were severely impacted by COVID.

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Core Program Areas

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Includes programs, events, trainings, public forums

Number of people informed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Core Program Areas

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

People informed through online news service and social media

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Clean Coastal Waters and Reduced Coastal Flooding
1. Statewide Nature-based Stormwater Action Plan: Providing solutions to reduce flooding and protect water quality for roadways, working lands, new development, and retrofits.
2. Watershed Planning Program: Assisting local governments in developing action plans to restore natural hydrology
3. Urban Stormwater Retrofit Program: Implementing on-the-ground solutions to water quality and flooding problems.
4. Wetland Restoration Program: Restoring wetland hydrology on a landscape scale to protect water quality and provide habitat.

Living Shorelines that Reduce Soundside Erosion and Create Coastal Habitat
1. Steering Committee: Providing coastwide leadership to advance living shorelines.
2. Cost-Share Program: Assisting waterfront property owners in the installation of living shorelines
3. Demonstration Program: Installing living shorelines to demonstrate success and raise awareness
4. Research and Testing: Supporting university and government research on living shorelines and testing alternative materials

Abundant Oysters that Support the Coastal Environment and the Economy
1. NC Oyster Blueprint and Shellfish Initiative: Providing coastwide leadership to support oyster populations and economic opportunities.
2. Restoration Program: Restoring oyster reefs, oyster sanctuaries, and cultch planting
3. Grow Shellfish Farming to a $100 Million Statewide Industry by 2030: Implementing the N.C. Strategic Plan for Mariculture.
4. Recycle for Reefs Program: Recycling oyster shell from consumers to restore oyster reefs.

Effective Coastal Management
1. Inform and Engage the Public on Issues including emerging contaminants, offshore oil and gas development, and keeping beaches and inlets natural and accessible.
2. Support clean water, oysters, living shorelines, marine debris, resilient coastal communities.
3. Respond to emerging issues related to environmental compliance, enforcement and justice.

A Coast That is Free of Marine Debris
1. NC Marine Debris Action Plan: Providing leadership to prevent and remove marine debris, conduct research, and assess and guide current efforts.
2. Debris Prevention Program: Preventing new debris through the Ocean Friendly Establishments Program, Best Management Practices for mariculture, construction and maintenance standards, microplastic prevention and more.
3. Debris Removal Program: Removing existing debris through volunteer cleanups, contracted crews, the Crab Pot Cleanup, and removal of abandoned vessels.

Educate and Engage
1. Student Education Program: Engaging thousands of students annually through classroom and field-based coastal curriculum, with a focus on serving those students who need it the most
2. Adult Education Program: Informing thousands of adults annually through continuing education trainings, webinars, public forums, and other events.
3. CoastalReview.Org: Delivering the news of the coast through our award-winning online news service

The North Carolina Coastal Federation engages people from all walks of life to protect and restore the coast. We find common ground among diverse groups of people forming alliances and recruiting nontraditional partners. We work for and with all people who depend on a healthy and productive coast to live, work and play. This often includes underserved communities who need to be included and heard in important coastal management issues.
Specifically, we:
Advocate: we take action by engaging people from all walks of life in decisions about the future of our coast. We inform and unite all people, communities, businesses and government agencies to form effective partnerships.
Restore: we coordinate and engage neighborhoods, local governments, engineers, contractors, landowners, and a host of volunteers to complete both small and very large-scale restoration projects.
Educate: we help people make a direct human connection with the coast. We believe that people need to understand the coastal environment and its connection and importance to our livelihoods to be able to bond with and advocate for it.
Inform: we empower people with knowledge. Our Coastal Review Online news service holds strongly to the belief that if you give people the facts; they will come to the right conclusions with the power of information on their side. We utilize CRO to tell stories about people and the coast, to share knowledge and open eyes and minds. Our reporting can provide a voice for underserved and diverse communities on coastal management issues related to the coastal environment and potential environmental injustices.
By purposefully engaging and including diverse audiences and ensuring everyone has the opportunity to learn, be involved and be heard, the federation commits to completing the following three-year goals.

The Coastal Federation is well-positioned to successfully achieve our organizational goals. With a professional staff of 30 located in three offices along the coast, the federation has a long track record of working at the community level with local partners to achieve shared goals. Staff have expertise in education, coastal science, stormwater management, grassroots organizing, communications, finance, and more, and work on teams to achieve organization goals. The federation engages over 1,000 volunteers each year to advise and assist with annual goals and benchmarks. The federation also has a diverse, 30-member Board of Directors as well as regional and ad hoc advisory committees that guide local initiative and special projects.

In nearly 40 years of protecting and restoring the North Carolina coast, the Coastal Federation has grown into one of the most effective organizations on the coast and a recognized leader. The federation reports our major accomplishments annually in our annual reports, available at www.nccoast.org and by request. Below are some quantitative measures of our accomplishments. Not listed here are the qualitative measures of our success- our impacts on coastal communities, our effectiveness connecting people to the coast, and our success building relationships and partners despite potential differences.
Key metrics include:
-Restored more than 6,600 acres large-scale, freshwater and tidal wetlands, providing habitat and improving water quality by restoring the natural hydrology. These projects prevented more than 620 million gallons of polluted stormwater from entering our coastal waters.
-Completed more than 15 watershed restoration plans and installed countless stormwater retrofit projects coastwide to prevent over 2 million polluted stormwater runoff from entering our coastal waters.
-Installed more than 80 living shoreline projects spanning over 4 miles of estuarine shoreline, restoring habitat, stabilizing eroding shorelines, and improving water quality.
-Restored almost 15 acres of fringe salt marsh and over 170 acres of oyster reefs, providing habitat and improving water quality.
-Delivered the news of the coast to over 500,000 readers in 2019 through the award-winning Coastal Review Online.
-Cleaned up thousands of lost crab pots and hundreds of tons of marine debris annually.
-Directly engaged an average of over 5,000 people through presentations, events and volunteerism annually.
-Educated an average of over 5,000 students through hands-on learning each year, many from underserved communities.
-Maintained the highest charity navigator rating for five consecutive years in 2020 for fiscal transparency and efficiency.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The Coastal Federation engages people from all walks of life in the long-term management and protection of our coast. We serve people across the state and region as well as in the 20 coastal counties. The federation works intentionally to engage traditional and non-traditional environmental partners as well as people from historically underrepresented communities in our projects and programs, as well as in our working groups, advisory committees, and Board of Directors.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, social media,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    A recent community event was shifted to a virtual forum with materials available on the website or in hard copy by request in response the feedback that travel to a in-person was not possible for all participants and that concerns about COVID were a barrier to participation.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The Coastal Federation routinely asks for feedback from the people we serve through ongoing meetings with advisory groups, requests for feedback after events, and guidance developing major programmatic goals. As a community-based group with a core mission of "working together", we respond to this guidance on an ongoing basis. Understanding that their voices are heard and their opinions do result in measurable change helps our community understand that their input is valued and encourages them to continue to participate.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback, It can be difficult to identify overall trends in bimodal data or opposing feedback,

Financials

North Carolina Coastal Federation, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

North Carolina Coastal Federation, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 09/20/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Joseph Ramus

Duke University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/15/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/03/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.