URBAN MINISTRIES OF DURHAM INC

aka UMD   |   Durham, NC   |  www.umdurham.org

Mission

We connect with the community to end homelessness and fight poverty by offering food, shelter and a future to neighbors in need.

Ruling year info

1983

Executive Director

Sheldon Mitchell

Main address

410 Liberty Street PO Box 249

Durham, NC 27702 USA

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EIN

58-1505891

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Urban Ministries of Durham's programs include the Community Shelter, the Community Kitchen, the Mission Society's clothing closet and food pantry, substance abuse recovery programs, and a social entrepreneurial venture, Clean Swee26 for adult women, and 9 private rooms (each with a private bath) for families. We have 150 total beds and with additional mats/cots can shelter up to 175 people. The family rooms are actually transitional housing and families are expected to stay a minimum of 6 months.

The Community Kitchen provides 3 meals per day seven days a week to anyone who comes to our dining room. We serve 450-475 plates per day, currently averaging nearly 15,000 plates per month.

The clothing closet is open two days per week, providing donated used clothes to 100-150 people monthly.

The food pantry provides donated groceries for in-home food preparation to 300-400 people every month.

Our recovery programs serve men and women in the Community Shelter who want to manage addictions. We create a therapeutic community of support, using a 12-Step model of recovery. The programs serve up to 30 men and 10 women at a time. Participants are allowed to stay six to nine months. In return for the services of the program and the free room and board the participants receive, they assist with janitorial and maintenance services in our two buildings.

Our social venture, Clean Sweep, provides competetively priced janitorial services to the local business community, ongoing support in substance abuse recovery to participants, and internship and employment opportunities to homeless and formerly homeless people.

Population(s) Served

Urban Ministries of Durham launched a workforce preparedness education initiative in 2015 to focus on helping homeless adults experiencing chronic barriers to employment. The training helps them find good jobs to pay for permanent housing and end their homelessness.

Population(s) Served

Urban Ministries of Durham's Journey Program groups clients with similar needs including: veterans, families, people with physical, mental health, or addiction issues and people who need help finding a better paying job. Case managers offer a structured approach to clients' major challenges and coordinate referrals to additional community resources in Durham's Homeless Continuum of Care. Clients work with a primary case manager who helps them set goals and identify opportunities for housing, employment, education, healthcare and other services. These goals are part of a part of a housing plan that will end the person's homelessness.

Population(s) Served

Urban Ministries of Durham connects with the community to offer emergency services for food and shelter to people in need. Primary services include: Community Cafe' serving three free meals per day to the community, 7 days per week, 365 days per year ; Food Pantry & Clothing Closet provides groceries and clothing based on qualified need.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

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Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Urban Ministries of Durham's mission is to connect with the community to end homelessness and fight poverty by offering food, shelter and a future to neighbors in need.

We envision a community that works together to help our neighbors, where the most basic needs of all are met and no one remains homeless. In that community, UMD provides immediate, emergency relief and works with its partners to prevent homelessness and to support and rapidly re-house those without homes.

We are a non-sectarian private 501©3 nonprofit committed to offering services in an environment that is based on our core values of respect, accountability, and collaboration and to living out those core values in all our interactions with our clients, each other, and the community. We welcome more than 6,000 people each year, many of them homeless.

Goals for the Fiscal Year 2014-2015 and beyond, are:

I. Increase homelessness prevention services through case management, workforce readiness and basic service efficiency.

II. Increase UMD's capacity to re-house emergency shelter clients within as short a time as possible to more stable living situations in permanent and transitional housing.

III. Offer emergency housing, food, clothing and support with dignity and compassion to neighbors in need, including those who may be chronically homeless, regardless of their ability to leave homelessness at this time.

IV. Collaborate with and rely upon community business partners to employee shelter clients to achieve more sustainable income and employment, to subsequently meet longer term housing and supportive service needs.

V. To accomplish UMD's program objectives within the fiscal year income and expense parameters approved by the Board of Directors.

I. Enhance emergency food and homelessness prevention services

Urban Ministries of Durham operates the Food Pantry and Clothing Closet to address basic emergency needs for food, clothing, and hygiene supplies. Most of those receiving support are not homeless but are trying to stretch limited resources. In fiscal year 2014-2015, the Food Pantry distributed 297,000 pounds of food, a substantial increase over the previous year, while the Clothing Closet distributed over 55,000 articles of clothing. The Food Pantry and Clothing Closet serve more than 400 households per month.

UMD's Community Café serves three meals a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year to shelter residents and anyone else in need of a meal. The welcoming Café area is a popular gathering place, and it is also used for community building and enrichment programs.

Our goal for the future is to provide the Food and Clothing Pantry for at least 600 households per month, and 300,000 Café meals including breakfast and dinner served in the Café and packable lunch for anyone in need.

II. Increase UMD's capacity to re-house emergency shelter guests within as short a time as possible to more stable living situations in permanent and transitional housing.

UMD's Community Shelter has 98 beds for men, 32 for women and nine family rooms with a total of 38 beds for parents and their children, for a total of 168 beds. There are also 25 overflow mats that supplement the bed space when needed, especially when the temperature is below freezing known as White Flag nights, for a total of 193 beds. Clients may stay as weekly guests at the shelter for up to 60 days per year. For the third fiscal year, we have continued to extend structured case management to this population by engaging interns from area colleges that offer social work degrees.

The Journey program provides all of the services of the Weekly Shelter Program, plus a longer term shelter commitment, a structured approach to recovery or lifestyle change, increased case management by staff case managers and coordinated referrals to others in Durham's Homeless Continuum of Care Network. The program is available for up to 400 shelter guests per year who demonstrate a strong desire to work towards goals to move forward from the shelter to transitional or permanent housing with a viable plan for self-sufficiency. The goal is for the average length of stay to be 90 days or less.

III. Grow workforce readiness initiative through community partnerships (employers) to provide jobs with sustainable income to homeless adults.

UMD's workforce development program was created to enhance UMD's case management program by offering in-house training job readiness programs, collaborative off-site workforce training and education opportunities and resources to homeless adults in order to obtain better paying jobs to afford and stay in housing.

Internal resources:

1. Our Journey Programs assist clients with one-on-one case management and are shown to have a significant impact on the likelihood of clients moving from shelter to permanent housing.

2. The new Clinical Specialist who is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker hired to lead intern case management work with Weekly Clients will continue to increase the number of shelter clients finding employment and permanent housing.

3. Strong staff of 39 people (mostly part-time) and volunteers.

4. New Workforce Development manager on staff to coordinate and manage in-house job readiness initiatives, client accountability in job search and placement and to drive community partnership recruitment.

External resources:

• Cash financial support from the community in excess of $1.8 million annually from: individuals, civic groups, congregations, foundations, corporations and others.

• In-kind support of donated food, items, and facilities in excess of an additional $1.9 million per year, including the use of our two buildings, one owned by Durham County which houses our community shelter.

• Extensive volunteer base that is relied upon heavily for UMD's functioning - Volunteers provide over 90% of the labor to prepare the meals in the Community Café, and community partners donate over 90% of the food, donations of clothing and food for closet and pantry.

• Community partners. We are part of a network of support organizations including the other homeless service providers in Durham's Continuum of Care as well as partner agencies in a position to help our clients meet critical needs, such as Families Moving Forward (temporary home to homeless families with children), Housing for New Hope ( prevents homelessness by offering access to housing, healthcare and integrated services), Dress For Success (business attire for interviews), Wheels4Hope (reliable used vehicles for school and work transportation), Green Chair Project (home furnishings for clients moving to permanent housing) - all working together to help meet the needs of the poor and homeless in Durham County.

Have:

During Fiscal 2014-2015, our shelter case management and support staff increased positive client outcomes and worked more efficiently with partners:

• 237 participants in our Journey Program left the shelter for permanent housing, a 10% increase over the previous fiscal year. Overall, 245 people ended their homelessness.

• 77% of those who entered the Journey Program exited the shelter to permanent housing. We gave emergency shelter and support to 26 families with children, 94% of whom left with keys to their own rental homes or apartments.

• 46 chronically homeless adults secured a permanent home, a 25% increase over the 37 for the previous fiscal year -- a result of more coordinated efforts with mental health, medical and permanent supportive housing providers.

• We launched our new Journey Vet program and successfully provided support and case management for 68 homeless veterans, 38 of whom left the shelter for permanent housing.

• We provided 52,506 nights of emergency shelter to 899 homeless individuals, including 310 chronically homeless in our community.

We made significant scheduling changes to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of our delivery of emergency services:

• We transitioned shelter check-in from daily check-in for a single night to two days per week with weekly stays to provide more stability for short-term clients to build upon by seeking housing and employment.

• While continuing to offer three meals a day, more than 250,000 for the year, we switched to a bag lunch to allow more time in the business day for housing and employment searches.

• We distributed food and clothing to an average of 487 households per month.

• With more available space in the Café during afternoons, we were able to work with partners to provide on-site computer classes, legal briefings, household finance, employment workshops, health clinics and more.

Have Not Yet accomplished:

• Completely ended chronic homelessness in our community.

• Overcome the impact of cutbacks and new regulations on the state and national levels. The reductions in funds for food stamps, Medicaid, mental health services, housing and unemployment have a significant impact on those we serve and heighten demand for our services – and leave clients we serve lacking essential services we are not in a position to provide for them. The continually increasing expectations on local organizations coupled with the reduction of funding present major challenges for us to overcome.

• Complete the third and final capital improvement phase to a three part capital improvement fund project in existence since 2005 to update the Community Cafe UMD's main gathering area for many programs to aid the larger community and shelter clients . The campaign would aim to support fundraising to replace critical commercial kitchen equipment, painting and floor tile replacement (original to the 33 year old building).

Financials

URBAN MINISTRIES OF DURHAM INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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URBAN MINISTRIES OF DURHAM INC

Board of directors
as of 6/23/2016
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

David Sotolongo

RTI International

Term: July 2014 -


Board co-chair

Harry Hutson

Jonah Kendall

Rector, St. Philips Episcopal Church

Elizabeth Hallyburton

Attorney, GlaxoSmithKline

David Sotolongo Board Chair

Vice President, RTI International

Randy Fletcher

Business Attorney, C.P.A., Moore & Van Allen

Yolanda Brown Board Treasurer

Entrepreneur, writer, blogger and founder of Fun Spaces

James Collins

Sales, Cintas

Angela Holmes

Homemaker

Brooke Jenkins Marketing and Development Committee Chair

Lead Consultant, Nonprofit Fundraising & Leadership Development, moss+ross

Frank Meachem

Funeral Director, Walter Sanders Funeral Home

Janet Northen

Partner, Director of Agency Communications, McKinney

Murrey Olmsted

Program Manager & Senior Research Psychologist, RTI International

Alex Sapir

Bob Walker

Chief Operating Officer, 8 Rivers Capital, LLC

Yvette West

Nurse, Retired

Michael Becketts

Durham County Department of Social Services

Lauren Ettson

Exchange Family Center

Lauren Goslin

LCSW, Triangle Neuropsychology Services

Harry Hutson Board Vice Chair

Management Consultant

Lorenzo Newsome

NCM Capital

Eddie Quaynor

Durham Center Access, Freedom House Recovery

Tiffany Russell

Law Office of Tiffany D. Russell

Madeline Seltman Board Secretary

Levin Jewish Community Center