PLATINUM2023

Charlotte Family Housing Inc.

Working to solve family homelessness

aka CFH   |   Charlotte, NC   |  charlottefamilyhousing.org

Mission

The mission of Charlotte Family Housing is to empower working families experiencing homelessness to achieve life-long self-sufficiency through shelter, housing, support services, and advocacy.

Notes from the nonprofit

Charlotte Family Housing is committed to decreasing homelessness and improving access to affordable housing in Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. We are a women-led, majority minority staffed nonprofit organization founded not as a program but rather a movement of holistic, healthy interventions and advocacy. We're a movement that plays off the strengths of our heroes experiencing homelessness-- a movement that wholeheartedly believes in the strength of these amazing families. Since our inception weve served over 1300 families and almost 3000 children. 98% of the families in our program are single moms of color and their children. 98% of our families sustained housing for at least two years after completing our program 81% of the families graduating our program were able to maintain or increase their income since entry.

Ruling year info

1985

Executive Director

Mrs. Elizabeth Kurtz

Main address

300 Hawthorne Lane 3rd floor

Charlotte, NC 28205 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Charlotte Emergency Housing

Family Promise of Charlotte

Workforce Initiative for Supportive Housing (W.I.S.H.)

EIN

58-1599120

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Housing Search Assistance (L30)

Housing Expense Reduction Support, Rent Assistance (L82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

In 2022 the average rent for an apartment in Charlotte is $1,559. Real Data, an apartment-tracking service, reported in September of 2020 that the average rent in Charlotte is $1,229 per month, which reflects an increase of 7.6% from February of 2018. The National Low Income Housing Coalition’s 2020 Out of Reach report states that Mecklenburg County families need to work 113 hours per week at the minimum wage of $7.25 per hour, or earn an hourly wage of $20.44 per hour, to afford a two-bedroom apartment. According to a report by the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute in September of 2020, over 81,600 renter households in Charlotte were “cost-burdened” in 2018, spending more than 30% of their income on rent and utilities. Unforeseen events or chronic circumstances like a loss of income, illness, family breakup, death in the family, or domestic violence can send already fragile families into homelessness. Those factors, compounded by the COVID-19 crisis, leave Charlotte Family Housing antic

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Shelter to Housing

Families begin their journey in a group home shelter where barriers to obtaining housing are addressed. Moms can concentrate on short-term goals without worrying about where their children will sleep each night. While living in these group shelters, CFH moms build a community of peer support while witnessing other moms graduate to the next phase of housing. After gaining peer mentorship through Resident Advisors (RA), CFH families are immediately paired with a Masters Level Social Worker (LCSW) who help families identify barriers to obtaining housing. Later, these same LCSWs will work with families to identify the barriers to maintaining housing. CFH assists families in obtaining rental housing with short-term subsidies, ultimately preparing them for sustainable unsubsidized housing within a year or two. Housing Resource Coordinators (HRC) connect families with housing through a network of nearly 70 partner housing providers in 21 zip codes throughout Mecklenburg County.

Population(s) Served
Families
Homeless people
Parents
Children and youth

CFH is a trauma-informed agency that employs nationally recognized practices to help each family member heal from the profound impact of poverty and homelessness. Through its two-generational approach, CFHs LCSWs understand how trauma affects how both the parent and the child respond to services. As a result, CFH utilizes best practice techniques to inspire and motivate families to keep moving forward. CFH Families also have access to free or reduced-cost therapeutic care.

Population(s) Served

. Empowerment Tools (Tools): CFH incorporates a healthy stepped approach to empower homeless families to move up and out of poverty. CFH strongly believe in the inherent strength of each family and that one-way charity is only effective in small doses. CFH moms are able to complete a series of achievable and rewarding transactions to help them reconnect with their inner strength. These accomplishments work to gradually relieve stress and free up more mental bandwidth for further positive steps. Below are a few examples whereby moms can:
Receive matching funds for a new security deposit via an interest-free loan;
Buy furniture for 30 cents on the dollar for a new apartment;
Purchase birthday or Christmas gifts at substantial discounts;
Earn Motivational Achievement Points (MAP) for completing tasks or program goals which can then be cashed in for gift cards or laptops;
Have savings matched upon program completion;
Attend educational workshops

Population(s) Served
Families
Homeless people
Children and youth
Parents
Families
Homeless people
Children and youth
Parents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Homeless people, Ethnic and racial groups

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people in the area with access to affordable housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Homeless people

Related Program

Shelter to Housing

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients for whom the transition plan is fully implemented (including receipt of all services as planned)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups, Homeless people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Homeless people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All families served by Charlotte Family Housing (CFH) are working families. The numbers listed represent the number of families served in each year.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since 2011, the mission of Charlotte Family Housing (CFH) has addressed two well-documented areas of concern in Mecklenburg County: Affordable Housing and Social Mobility. Our mission is to empower working families experiencing homelessness to achieve life-long self-sufficiency through shelter, housing, supportive services, and advocacy. Our program aims to fight cyclical poverty and make a difference today that positively affects future generations.

In the fiscal year 2020-2021, CFH served 723 individuals in 239 families, including 484 children. CFH evaluates its ultimate success by calculating the number of individuals served and how many families maintain housing upon leaving our program. CFH continues to document our assessment of a familys progress at three-month intervals after program completion. Our outcomes validate that our model can break the cycle of generational poverty and homelessness. According to our most recent client surveys for FY 2020-2021:

95% of families exited the subsidized Housing Phase into stable, sustainable, and unsubsidized permanent housing
100% of families sustained housing for at least 2 years after completing the CFH program (based on a client contact rate of 93%)
74% of the families exiting the CFH program were able to maintain or increase their income since program entry
Since October of 2018, 57 CFH families garnered a mortgage to buy a home.

These outcomes remain consistent with our results to date since 2012. Between the fiscal years 2012 and 2021, CFH served 1,147 families, including 2,525 children. Our findings validate that our model can break the cycle of generational poverty and homelessness.

All CFH families begin their journey in a group home shelter (Hawthorne Place or Plaza Place) where barriers to OBTAINING housing are addressed. Families experiencing homelessness come to CFH after living in their cars, staying in extended hotels and with friends. Having experienced housing instability trauma (and many other traumas), CFH families can concentrate on short-term goals without worrying about where their children will sleep. While living in these group shelters for roughly 90 days, CFH families build a community of peer support. CFH families also begin a program-long relationship with Masters Level LCSWs, who initially help families identify obstacles to gaining housing (eg unreliable childcare, problematic transportation, or unpredictable hours). CFH families focus on creating a budget, taking financial literacy classes, and saving. At the same time, CFH assists families in obtaining rental housing with short-term subsidies. Housing Resource Coordinators connect families with housing through a network of nearly 70 partner housing providers in 21 zip codes throughout Mecklenburg County.
Once families have completed a housing search and moved into supportive housing, these same LCSWs will work with families to identify the barriers to MAINTAINING housing. CFH families work to improve credit, establish a positive leasing record, move ahead in their careers, and build stability into their budget. Most CFH families will sign two 1-year leases and receive case management by LCSWs and Housing coordinators throughout.
Since CFH is a trauma-informed agency, it employs nationally recognized practices to help each family member heal from the profound impact of poverty and homelessness. Through its two-generational approach, LCSWs understand how trauma affects how both the parent and the child respond to services. As a result, CFH provides the needed safe physical and emotional environment for families. CFH also prioritizes access to mental health care through free or reduced-cost therapeutic care scholarships for the all individuals or the collective family.
At CFH, supportive services come in the form of empowerment tools: CFH recognizes the inner strength of families and uses many tools to transform past negative cycles with positive, self-affirming experiences. CFH families are eligible to receive matching funds for a new security deposit via an interest-free loan, buy furniture for 30 cents on the dollar for a new apartment, earn Motivational Achievement Points (MAP) for completing program goals which can then be cashed in for gift cards, and earn an exit bonus of $1,000. CFH also empowers families to move ahead with economic and career goals by providing job training opportunities in 8-10 monthly workshops and scholarships for training programs and educational certificates. Other workshop topics include parenting, budgeting, credit repair, self-care, preparing for homeownership, managing stress, and resume writing.

Charlotte Family Housing defines success as families being in stable, sustainable, and unsubsidized permanent housing at least two years after program completion. CFH measures its progress and success by evaluating how many families maintain housing upon leaving its program. Using Salesforce software for data collection, CFH documents a family's progress at three-month intervals with post-exit surveys for two years after program completion. During these conversations, CFH inquiries into rental status, child well-being, and employment.
In the fiscal year 2021-2022, CFH served 688 individuals in 211 families, including 457 children.
CFH is proud to share that in the most recent client surveys for FYE 2022:
95% of families exited the subsidized Housing Phase into stable, sustainable, and unsubsidized permanent housing
98% of families sustained housing for at least two years after completing the CFH program (based on a client contact rate of 93%)
81% of families maintained or increased income between program entry and exit.
Since October of 2018, seventy-three (73) CFH families have been approved to purchase a home. Fifty-two (52) of those families have already bought and live in their new homes, completing an incredible journey from homelessness to homeownership

Since its inception, CFH has addressed two areas of concern in Mecklenburg County: Affordable Housing and Social Mobility. CFH serves an often unnoticed" homeless population: primarily single moms who fill critical roles such as cashiers, food service workers, daycare attendants, CNAs, bus drivers, and even schoolteachers. One crisis can send these moms and their children spiraling into homelessness. For 12 years, CFHs model has proven immensely successful. Between 2012 and 2023, CFH has served 1,429 families and 3,122 children.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Charlotte Family Housing Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Charlotte Family Housing Inc.

Board of directors
as of 12/04/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs. Tricia Wilson Magee

US District Court for the Western District of North Carolina

Term: 2023 - 2025


Board co-chair

Mrs. Paula Moss

CBRE

Term: 2025 - 2023

Eric Moody

RBC Capital Markets

Paul Baalman

Crosland Southeast

Lamont Simmons

LS Maintenance Management LLC

Matt Ricketts

Wells Fargo

Darren Ash

The ROC

Elizabeth Dickens

Self-Employed

Ben Hill

RSM Company

Robert Hoyla

Truist

Kari Kalgren

Premier Inc.

Scott Shannon

Windmere Insurance

Tricia Wilson Magee

US District Court for the Western District of North Carolina

Paula Moss

CBRE

Paul Finnen

Paul Finnen And Associates

Amber Mulligan

Trane Technologies

Tim Vest

HarVEST Properties

Jill Cole

Carolina Panthers

Angela Witt

Wells Fargo

Patty Brown

Publix

Louise Bhavnani

Nucor

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/4/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 12/30/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.