Rheumatology Research Foundation

Advancing Treatment. Finding Cures.

Atlanta, GA   |  http://rheumresearch.org

Mission

Advancing research and training to improve the health of people with rheumatic diseases.

Notes from the nonprofit

To learn more about the Rheumatology Research Foundation, or to make a donation, please visit www.rheumresearch.org.

Ruling year info

1988

Executive Director

Ms. Mary J Wheatley IOM, CAE

Main address

2200 Lake Boulevard NE

Atlanta, GA 30319 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

American College of Rheumatology Research and Education Foundation

EIN

58-1654301

NTEE code info

Medical Specialty Research (H90)

Medical Specialty Research (H90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Establishing a productive research career in rheumatology is largely dependent upon the availability of major research funding. Increasing concerns over the decline in federal funding for rheumatology research have forced many investigators to reconsider their careers, which leads to fewer researchers making important discoveries necessary to advance treatments and find cures. The Career Development ResearchAwards are designed to encourage early and midcareer investigators to continue vital research into the cause, prevention, and treatment of rheumatic diseases.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Innovative Research Awards

The Innovative Research Awards encourage
independent investigators to conduct novel
studies that generate new insights into the
cause, progression, treatment and outcomes of
rheumatic diseases.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The purpose of the Rheumatology Scientist Development Award is to provide support for a structured, formal, clinical or basic science research training program for rheumatologists or health professionals in the field of rheumatology. This award is designed for individuals in the early stages of their career or those without significant prior research experience who plan to embark on careers in biomedical and/or clinical research in arthritis and rheumatic diseases.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Building the rheumatology workforce in
attempts to satisfy the growing demand for
rheumatologists and rheumatology health
professionals requires robust education and
training opportunities. The Education and
Training Awards help cultivate future generations
of rheumatology professionals and ensure that
people with rheumatic diseases have access to
the care they need.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2010

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2011

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2012

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2013

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2014

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2015

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2016

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2017

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2018

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2019

Charity Navigator 4 Stars 2020

Awards

4-star rating, 12 years in a row 2020

Charity Navigator

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

NIH grant funding awarded to Foundation funded investigators.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health

Related Program

Career Development Awards

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total from previous 5 years

Publications in peer-review literature and medical journals.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Health

Related Program

Innovative Research Awards

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total from previous 5 years.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Chronically ill people

Related Program

Innovative Research Awards

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of rheumatology investigators who have received NIH funding based on their Foundation funded research.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Innovative Research Awards

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Workforce Development: The foundation will expand the rheumatology workforce to meet the needs of people with rheumatic diseases.

Innovative Research: The Foundation will support a targeted research agenda that leads to improve treatments and cures for the rheumatic diseases.

Financial Resources. The Foundation will provide funding that supports the expansion of its programs to fulfill its mission.

Expanding Rheumatology Workforce - The Foundation devotes about 50 percent of its funding to education, training and career development. The portfolio includes the following grants: Student and Resident Preceptorships, Fellowship Training Awards, Scientist Development Awards, Investigator Awards, and Clinician Scholar Educator Awards. Abstract awards and outreach awards are also included in this category.
Supporting Innovative Research - The Innovative Research program focuses on all forms of inflammatory arthritis including spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. About 50 percent of the Foundation's funding is devoted to innovative research, including basic, translational and clinical research grants.

Internal Resources - The foundation employs approximately 20 FTEs staff and shares overhead and other resources with the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), which allows the foundation to remain extremely efficient with donor funds. The focus of the foundation over the past few years has been on major gifts fundraising, and it does not spend a lot of effort on special events or other less effective means of fundraising.

External Strengths - The biggest strength of the Foundation is its relationship with the rheumatology community. The Foundation's relationship with the ACR has also been important to its success in the rheumatology community and its strong relationship with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Representatives from the NIH participate in all investigators meetings and assist with regular review of the awards portfolio.

Expanding the Rheumatology Workforce: Since the Foundation began its own peer-reviewed research program in 2000, the number of fellows completing rheumatology training has nearly doubled.

Medical Student Recruitment: Nearly half of those who complete Foundation preceptorships chose rheumatology as their subspecialty.

Scientific Progress: 70 percent of Foundation investigators have received additional funding, 72 percent have been selected to present and publish their work and 85 percent remain in an academic environment, which is crucial to advancing treatment and finding cures.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    People with rheumatic disease - Ensuring there are enough rheumatology professionals who are trained to treat them, and funding research that will lead to better treatment options and cures. Rheumatology Community - Investing in researchers with novel ideas, funding preceptorships to train future rheumatologists, and offering scholarships to students and residents so we continue to attract more people into the field.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The Foundation recognized that patients and caretakers want to be a part of the research process and created a Patient Engagement Working Group. This group provided insight and guidance as to how patients can be included more in research. Last year the Foundation also created the Impact Advisory Council, bringing together clinicians and patients to identify projects that are meaningful and interesting to patients.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Feedback and provided significant insight into recent changes that impact the rheumatology community and the patients they serve. Based on this feedback, the Foundation implemented a quarterly webinar series to provide patients and caretakers with direct access to medical professionals.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Rheumatology Research Foundation
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Rheumatology Research Foundation

Board of directors
as of 10/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. S. Louis Bridges, Jr.

Hospital for Special Surgery

Term: 2019 - 2021

S. Louis Bridges Jr., MD, PhD

Hospital for Special Surgery

Kenneth Saag, MD, MSc

Bryce Binstadt, MD

V. Holers, MD

Deborah Desir, MD

Doug White, MD, PhD

Ted Mikuls, MD

Vikas Majithia, MD, MPH

Steve Russell, MBA

Mara Becker, MD

Kevin Deane, MD

Beverly Guin

Jody Hargrove, MD

Alvin Wells, MD

Leo Wegemer, JD, LLM

Elizabeth McKelvey

Beth Jonas, MD

Jeff Stark, MD

Daniel White, PT, ScD, MSc

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/17/2021,

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/17/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.