PLATINUM2024

ATLANTA-FULTON COUNTY ZOO INC

aka Zoo Atlanta   |   Atlanta, GA   |  www.zooatlanta.org

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Mission

Zoo Atlanta's mission is to save wildlife and their habitats through research, conservation, education and engaging experiences. The Zoo's efforts connect people to animals and inspire conservation action.

Ruling year info

1986

President & CEO

Mr. Raymond B. King

Main address

800 Cherokee Avenue SE

Atlanta, GA 30315 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1655184

NTEE code info

Zoo, Zoological Society (D50)

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Access Programs

Zoo Atlanta is a community resource and being accessible to all citizens is an integral part of the Zoo's mission. As a dynamic contributor to the cultural landscape of Atlanta, Zoo Atlanta maintains several key community access programs and partnerships to ensure all Georgia community members can enjoy the Zoo. During the 2022-2023 school year, the Sponsored Admissions Program provided free admission for 17,358 students from 178 Title I schools in Georgia. In 2023, the Zoo ACCESS Program distributed free admission tickets to 3,710 disadvantaged Georgians through partnerships with local government agencies and community organizations. Partnering with the Georgia Public Library Service, the Zoo offered free admission through the Library Pass Program presented by PNC Bank and served 35,624 Georgia residents. In 2023, 13,801 active-duty, reserves, veterans, and retired members of the Armed Forces received free admission.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

The Zoo creates fun and engaging experiences to connect visitors to wildlife, provide and support curricula to improve students' understanding of the natural world, and empower individuals to take action. In 2023, Zoo Atlanta education programs served 877,365 individuals through public programs on Zoo grounds, 106,004 through instructor-led programs, and 2,960 through offsite instruction programs. Zoo Atlanta helps students master the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. The Zoo Education team works closely with the Georgia Department of Education, the Georgia Public Library Service, and school systems throughout the state to design programming to serve the community and support all state education standards. Examples of unique Zoo Atlanta education programs include ZooMobile Outreach, Safari Day Camps, Stroller and Adventure Cubs Programs, Teacher Training Workshops, Wild Encounters, Keeper for a Day, and NightCrawlers Overnight Program.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Zoo Atlanta guides conservation action, both locally and globally, using its expertise and position within the community. The Zoo is directly involved in field work, community outreach, research, and education programs worldwide, including in Africa, Asia, Central and South America, as well as locally in Georgia and the Southeastern U.S. The Zoo also contributes to other established conservation for greater total impact in the field. The Mabel Dorn Reeder Conservation Endowment Fund allows Zoo Atlanta to support conservation to reverse species decline. Significantly, Zoo Atlanta has contributed more than $10 million for the conservation of wild giant pandas in China. Examples of current conservation projects include Conservation South Luangwa, Quarters for Conservation, 96 Elephants, Golden Lion Tamarin Conservation Project, Chilean Flamingo Banding Project, Asian Turtle Crisis, Guatemalan Beaded Lizards Conservation Project, Bog Restoration in Georgia, and Species Survival Plans.

Population(s) Served
Activists
Adults

Research is another integral part of Zoo Atlanta’s mission, and the Zoo contributes to the body of scientific knowledge by using the diversity of its animal populations and the expertise of its staff. The Zoo has more than 410 peer-reviewed publications, with an emphasis on primates, giant pandas and herpetology, focusing on animal biology, behavior, cognition and conservation. Not only does research help staff better understand and care for the animals at the Zoo, but it also provides staff with valuable insights that enables the protection of species’ counterparts in the wild. Experts at Zoo Atlanta participate in ongoing research programs in Georgia and around the world. A few examples of current research projects include the Great Ape Heart Project, Giant Panda Research, Kori Bustard Ethotrak Project and the Orangutan Learning Tree Project.

Population(s) Served
Academics
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Atlanta's Most Admired Nonprofit CEO 2014

Atlanta Business Chronicle

Atlanta's Most Admired Nonprofit CEO 2015

Atlanta Business Chronicle

World's First LEED Gold-Certified amphibian and reptile exhibit 2015

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council

Atlanta's Most Admired Nonprofit CEO 2016

Atlanta Business Chronicle

International Conservation Award 2017

Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ (AZA)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of fields trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Education Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Total number of free admissions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Community Access Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Students

Related Program

Education Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Education Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of guests who visited Zoo Atlanta

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of species in collection

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Conservation Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

ATLANTA-FULTON COUNTY ZOO INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

ATLANTA-FULTON COUNTY ZOO INC

Board of directors
as of 02/08/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. R. Scott Taylor, Jr.

Carter & Associates

Term: 2021 - 2024

Bill Cary

Georgia Division of Investment Services

James Cheeks

Fortas Homes and Fortas Realty

Tye Darland

Georgia-Pacific

Cindy Davis

Greenberg Traurig

Mike Dickerson

ClickDimensions

Andrew W. Evans

Southern Company

Nick Franz

Ernst & Young LLP

Kathleen Goddard

Community Leader

Dr. Duane Jackson

Morehouse College

Sonji Jacobs

Advisor/Consultant

Beth Kytle Chandler

Cresset

Lisa Laube

Floor & Decor

Nathan Lewis

Security Capital Brokerage, Inc.

William Nemetz

Primerica, Inc.

Deepak Raghavan

Manhattan Associates/Georgia State University

Mark Roberts

Bentley Holdings

Gigi Rouland

Community Leader

Matthew Simon-Schumann

Community Leader

R. Scott Taylor, Jr.

Carter & Associates

Tim Wilkerson

The Home Depot

Todd Ellis

KPMG

Fran Forehand

Georgia Power

Jerry Gahlhoff

Rollins, Inc.

Robert Holder

Holder Properties

Suzanne Mitchell

SynergyGPS, LLC

David Moody

Moody Construction

Sunny Park

Global Sun Investments, Inc.

Mary Clancy Peak

Chick-fil-A

M. Caroline Reddington

PNC

DeRetta Cole Rhodes, PhD

Atlanta Braves

Carli Huband

Aprio

Jewelle Johnson

Graphic Packaging

Kim Lyman

Norfolk Southern

Vijay Pinto

Deloitte

Sarah Greenberg Sachs

The Coca-Cola Company

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/1/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/29/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.