PLATINUM2023

Communities In Schools of Charlotte Mecklenburg Inc.

Charlotte, NC   |  www.cischarlotte.org

Mission

The mission of Communities In Schools of Charlotte-Mecklenburg, Inc. (CIS) is to surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life.

Ruling year info

1986

President and CEO

Mr. Men Tchaas Ari

Main address

601 E. 5th Street Suite 300

Charlotte, NC 28202 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Communities In Schools, Charlotte-Mecklenburg, Inc.

EIN

58-1661795

NTEE code info

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Over the past 3 years, millions of our nation's children have fallen behind academically, particularly students living in poverty, those attending high-poverty schools, and students of color. Readjusting to the structure of in-person learning as well as coping with unresolved trauma/isolation related to the pandemic continues to foster disconnection/ disengagement for many already marginalized students. The ripple effects of the pandemic are surfacing in high chronic absenteeism rates and lower academic performance. Over 1 in 4 CMS students (29%) were chronically absent in the 21-22 school year, twice as high as before the pandemic (CMS 2022). Composite test scores for all subjects and grade levels from the 21-22 school year indicate 49.8% students are NOT grade level proficient and 34.8% are considered College-and-Career Ready proficient. Among economically disadvantaged students, those scores are 67.5% and 17.9% respectively (NC DPI 2022). These are the students whom CIS serves.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Communities In Schools of Charlotte-Mecklenburg, Inc. (CIS)

CIS places full-time, trained professionals – our Site Coordinators – in selected Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools to provide our evidence-based Integrated Student Supports. Site Coordinators work side by side with students, parents, teachers, school administrators, volunteers and community partners to provide caring relationships and critical resources to students and families. From basic needs such as clothing and health screenings, to academic support, mentoring, and exposure to cultural and work-life experiences, we do whatever it takes to ensure that students – regardless of the challenges they face – have what they need to build on their strengths, experience success in school, and reach their greatest potential.

CIS also provides Specialized Intervention Services that address very specific challenges of young people in our community, including: newcomer services, support for teen parents and college access and career readiness for "first-generation" students.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2009

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of CIS Seniors who graduated from high school

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Communities In Schools of Charlotte-Mecklenburg, Inc. (CIS)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percent of CIS Students who stayed in school

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Communities In Schools of Charlotte-Mecklenburg, Inc. (CIS)

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CIS is guided by the larger vision of increasing the number of high school graduates, helping better position students to learn, and assisting students/families with accessing viable paths for post-secondary education/careers while fostering other opportunities for achievement, self-sufficiency, and educational equity. We are committed to ensuring that our students attend school daily, demonstrate positive youth development (including social-emotional learning), succeed academically, and are positioned for post-secondary success. CIS believes in our students, in their abilities and their amazing potential to take charge of their own stories. Our ultimate goal is to break down immediate and systemic barriers to create and sustain equitable outcomes.

With our focus on attendance, college/career readiness, and overall student well-being, the CIS model remains applicable--perhaps even more so-- as the school district and our community seek to reengage young people, address chronic absenteeism, promote post-secondary success, and foster a school environment benefitting ALL students. The role of CIS staff and the trusted relationships we build with students, families, and school personnel, coupled with our use of evidence-based programming grounded by needs assessment, community-asset mapping, and data-driven case management processes, uniquely position CIS to contribute to the necessary conditions for learning and, ultimately, educational equity.

Utilizing the evidence-based Integrated Student Supports delivery model, a foundational framework of Social-Emotional Learning (SEL), and a Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Access (DEIA) lens, CIS staff comprehensively assess/identify student strengths and barriers, then deliver case-management tailored to meet each child's unique needs to help meet them where they are; set personal and educational goals; and stay on track to reach their full potential. Targeted interventions provide supportive services focused on Attendance, Behavior, Coursework, and Parent Engagement. These focused supports, along with SEL, college readiness/career development activities, and life/leadership skills help to ensure that students progress on a positive trajectory to and through high school and beyond, unlocking their boundless potential and securing their own future.

Trained CIS Site Coordinators serve as pivotal, trusted, and consistent points of contact for students and their families. Parents and caregivers have shared that they see CIS staff as ("go to") critical connectors to vital programming, information/services and school/community resources. We work collaboratively with the entire school team (teachers/Student Support Teams/administrators), the district, and other community agencies to address key needs of our students, their families and neighborhoods, and the schools with which we partner. CIS staff ensure that resources are accessible, coordinated, and maximized. Our strategic coordination reduces duplication of limited services and builds on the existing strengths and assets of schools and their surrounding neighborhoods to address the complexity of student and family needs. Our daily presence in the schools, relationships with school personnel and our students/their families, as well as our collaborative partnerships with other community agencies, sets CIS apart.

Our organization, which began in 1985 at a single school serving 80 students, now impacts the lives of over 5,800 young people annually at 56 Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools' (CMS) sites. CIS also assists an additional 30,000+ students at these same schools through school-wide programming, resource securement, and referrals to other county and agency supports. Our Comprehensive Service Delivery Model has expanded over the years from our school-based PreK-12 Intensive Student Supports (ISS)programming to also include Specialized Interventions that target/address specific chronic and increasing issues including college access/career readiness for low-income, first-generation students; support for teen parents balancing the challenges of childcare/high school graduation; assistance for youth who have been involved with the criminal justice system with their efforts to continue their education; serving immigrant/refugee/English Language Learner (ELL) students; and most recently, reengaging students who detached, disconnected, and/or disappeared from school during the pandemic and remote learning.

CIS is pleased to highlight the efforts of 70+ CIS staff who returned in-person to 55 Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools (44 Title I) for the 2021-22 school year.

Core outcomes:
* 65% of CIS students were not chronically absent. (CIS attendance data reflects local and national trends of decreased student engagement and increased chronic absenteeism due to lingering effects of pandemic (including mandatory quarantine).
* 99% of CIS students stayed in school.
* 97% of CIS students were promoted to next grade level.
* 84% of CIS students achieved or made progress towards their identified academic, attendance, and/or SEL goals.
* 383 CIS Seniors graduated this past June with 84% indicating plans to attend a 2 or 4 year college and 15% entering an apprenticeship, the military, or workforce.

Key outputs:
* Conducted School Assessment & created School Plan for each school.
* Over 5,400 case-managed students (Integrated Student Supports plus Specialized Interventions) received targeted student supports based on his/her Individual Student Assessment & Student Plan.
* 32,000+ additional students received broad school-wide services.
* 92,000+ direct services and referrals were provided to our student caseload and their families in the areas of critical needs; Social-Emotional Learning; parent/guardian engagement; academic enrichment/support; leadership/life skills; college/career readiness; and social capital.

Highlighted activities:
* Attendance/engagement/academic/behavior monitoring and interventions (as needed)
* Distribution of school supplies, clothing, hygiene items, other critical needs
* Parent/guardian phone calls, texts, home visits, newsletters, workshops
* Review of grades, credits, transcripts
* Check-ins
* Goal-setting
* Classroom observation
* Tips on organization, time-management, study habits, test-taking, etc.
* Social-Emotional Learning curriculum/activities
* Academic enrichment/support (book clubs, End-of-Grade (EOG) prep, cultural field trips, tutoring, etc.)
* Leadership/life skills
* College/career readiness
* Social capital opportunities
* Holiday sponsorships
* Quarterly recognition/ Year-end celebrations
* School-wide support (Open House, Attendance Awareness month, family nights, college & career fairs, Second Harvest Food Pantry, College Decision Day celebrations, translation, etc.)
* Community referrals to other community agencies and resources

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

Communities In Schools of Charlotte Mecklenburg Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Communities In Schools of Charlotte Mecklenburg Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/20/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Niles Brown

Jon Davis

Making Room

Veronica Calderon

DeVry University

Dwight Jacobs

Duke Energy

Federico Rios

City of Charlotte

Niles Brown

Grant Thornton

John A Tate III

Civic Leader

Kathryn Black

Bank of America

Jordan Collier

Bristol Myers Squibb

Yulonda D Griffin

Mecklenburg County

Vida Harvey

Novant Health

Andy Kalbaugh

Civic Leader

Shivani Mehta

Atrium Health

Eric W Norris

Albemarle Corporation

Nate Salley

Audible Coaching and Consulting

Diamond Staton-Williams

Atrium Health

Maxine Swayne

US Bank

Daniel Valdez

Hispanic Federation

Laura Vinroot Poole

Capitol, Poole Shop and Tabor

Brad Brown

Ally

Ty Chandler

AvidXchange

Steve Menaker

RSM Charlotte

Kayla Witherspoon

Property Maven, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/13/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/08/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.