COVENANT HOUSE NEW ORLEANS

New Orleans, LA   |  www.covenanthousenola.org

Mission

Covenant House serves young people facing homelessness and trafficking by providing relentless support, absolute respect, and unconditional love. Since 1987, we have served over 30,000 youth, offering food, emergency shelter, clothing, medical attention, individual & family counseling, educational assistance, vocational & job training services, life skills, short & long term housing, and so much more. In the past 10 years, our average daily census has increased from 45 to 220 kids per night. As a private nonprofit, we are dependent on charitable donations for 64% of our funding.

Ruling year info

1986

Executive Director

Ms. Rheneisha Robertson

Main address

611 N Rampart St

New Orleans, LA 70112 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1669937

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our youth face some of the greatest challenges in our community: 85% are survivors of physical abuse and/or sexual abuse, assault, or rape 30% aged out of foster care 15% ran away from home 75% were thrown out of homes that no longer wanted them 52% are young women, 46% are young men, and 2% are transgender 40% of our young men and 30% of our young women have been released from jail or juvenile detention 36% of our young women are mothers 30% are survivors of human trafficking and/or sexual labor 35% identify as LGBTQ+ 85% suffer from PTSD/poly-trauma – 35% receive medication 80% have used drugs – 40% require support for serious substance use disorders

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

24/7 Care Center

We offer three levels of residential care: short-term crisis care, longer-term transitional living programs, and supportive housing in off-site apartments for youth with mental health disabilities. A spectrum of professional services address root causes of homelessness, beyond the lack of immediate housing. This includes job readiness training and assistance finding jobs; a job training program in landscape services; assistance enrolling in partnering programs such as Café Reconcile, Liberty’s Kitchen, Goodwill Culinary Arts, and Louisiana Green Corps; life skills training; pre-school education enrollment; medical and behavioral health care in partnership with Tulane Medical School; and pastoral services. Youth are encouraged to complete high school or to enroll in partnering GED programs at the Youth Empowerment Project (NOPLAY program) and the city’s JOB 1 workforce development center for youth. We also assist our young people in applying to college and entering vocational training programs. Our outreach staff works with unhoused youth and makes presentations on homeless issues and services in our community. All of these programs help our youth build skills, resources, knowledge, and the confidence to pursue healthy futures.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people

Highly motivated residents can apply to transitional living through our Rights of Passage program. We provide on-campus housing, counseling, and mentoring while residents work, save, and advance their education. Residents attend school and work between 50 to 55 hours a week. Participants save 40% of their income is saved and spend 20% toward their food and rent. We provide 24/7 case management and counseling while they build skills and resources for independent living. In our Rights of Passage community, residents create a weekly budget for meals and cooks dinner together in their communal kitchen.

Covenant House also helps residents move into their own apartments off-site through our Rapid Re-housing program. Our staff help young people find appropriate and affordable housing on their own or with a family member or friend.We also offer financial assistance (on a sliding scale) for 10 months to help youth and families establish their independence. Our youth attend meetings with staff on a bi-weekly basis to help them acquire and maintain off-site housing.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people

For our youth and young parents with a diagnosed disability, we offer long-term supportive housing. Youth in this program live in off-site apartments while remaining closely connected to Covenant House's services and support system. We provide programs directly, while also linking youth to community and neighborhood resources. Services provided by Covenant House include physical health and mental health care, job and education assistance, supportive services, and financial assistance.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of unhoused youth and children who took refuge at Covenant House New Orleans, receiving food, clothing, shelter, case management and counseling.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Young adults, Infants and toddlers, LGBTQ people, At-risk youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Percentage of youth and children in our 24/7 Emergency Crisis Center who were placed in safe, decent housing, including family reunification whenever possible.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

24/7 Care Center

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth in our "Rights of Passage" transitional living program who received longer-term support, residing on-campus as they worked, saved, continued their education, and built life skills.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Transitional living

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of residents and youth in the community who benefited from onsite adolescent and pediatric health services, provided in partnership with Tulane Medical School.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth enrolled in high school, GED programs, or college

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children enrolled in Head Start or elementary school

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of youth provided with bus tickets across the country to reunite with family or relatives who were able to offer a stable and safe living environment.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

24/7 Care Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our youth face some of the greatest challenges in our community. We have served thousands of youth facing homelessness and trafficking since we opened in 1986. Our first objective is reuniting young people with family, but when that is not possible, we provide residential programs and professional support services to help them move out of poverty and start building brighter futures. The ultimate outcome is independent living as self-sufficient, adult members of our community.

With the help of the Covenant House New Orleans family, our youth ages 22 and under are receiving the unconditional love and relentless support they need to begin healing and start building brighter futures.

We provide three levels of residential support: emergency shelter, transitional living, and off-site apartment housing. Our shelter is open 24/7 to provide food, clothing, and short-term housing for youth and young families in crisis. Our transitional living and permanent supportive housing (PSH) programs foster achievement and growth beyond the average 27-day stay in our shelter. Youth in our transitional living received 6-18 months of supportive housing while they worked, saved, continued their education, and built life skills. Our PSH apartments help those with disabilities maintain independent living. All of our youth benefit from case management & counseling, educational & vocational services, and medical & behavioral health care. Our caseload has increased dramatically; we now average over 200 youth and children per night and over 900 each year. We also serve about 25,000 meals annually.

We have an experienced, professional staff working with our kids. They provide educational, vocational, employment, physical health, and mental health assessments to each youth who comes to us for help. We maintain a youth development approach in our work. Case managers help youth develop individualized plans to guide their stays. Education and employment staff work with youth to improve their job skills and explore employment opportunities, and to address their educational levels. Those without high school diplomas receive assistance to enroll in GED programs; minors are encouraged to stay in school, and we typically have five or six high school (and even college) students living with us. Our licensed youth counselors present workshops on topics such as Conflict Resolution and Creative Expressions. We also have outreach staff that work with unhoused youth, building their trust to accept needed services at Covenant House, from other providers, and right on the street.

We have a track record for service recognized throughout our community, where we are the only provider of an open-intake crisis shelter for youth, and the only provider of a large transitional living program for young men and women. We have professional staff (many with advanced degrees and certification, including Licensed Clinical Social Workers); established income sources (64% private income from individual donors and from corporate/foundation grants); a supportive parent organization, Covenant House International; and an active, volunteer Board of Directors comprised of business, civic, and non-profit leaders in our community. We own our buildings, have an endowment, and attract print and broadcast media attention for our work and our young people's successes.

Our crucial network of service partners is growing. This has proven to be a cost and outcome effective approach to care. Our partners include the Youth Empowerment Project (YEP) and the city's Job 1 workforce development office for GED programs; Café Reconcile, Liberty's Kitchen, Goodwill Culinary Arts, Louisiana Green Corps, Job 1 and others for job training programs; local businesses that provide jobs for our kids; Tulane University Medical School that operates our on-site adolescent and pediatric health clinics, and joins us in providing behavioral health services; and many other medical service providers (such as dental, eye, and OB/Gyn care). Community volunteers broaden our kids' life experiences through their mentoring, assistance, and support.

In 2020, a total of 896 young people took refuge from abusive homes and violent streets at Covenant House. They received food, clothing, shelter, counseling, case management, life skills, and so much more. Read our highlights below:

24/7 Emergency Crisis Care
• 480 youth and children served
• 70% found stable housing and/or family reunification
Rights of Passage (ROP) Transitional Living
• 112 youth and children served
• 86% graduated to a good job and stable housing
Medical & Behavioral Healthcare
• 98% of residents received comprehensive care in our
onsite clinic, in partnership with Tulane Medical School
• 81% showed improved functioning in jobs, school, and
interpersonal relations
Employment
• 214 youth found work or entered job training programs
• Education
• 59 children enrolled in Head Start or elementary school
• 56 youth and children enrolled in high school, college,
or GED/HiSET programs
Human Trafficking
• 90 youth served
• 77% found stable housing and/or family reunification
Outreach & Aftercare
• 217 youth received counseling and emergency services
in the community
Reunification
• 148 youth received bus or plane tickets to reunite with
family or relatives offering a safe and stable environment

Financials

COVENANT HOUSE NEW ORLEANS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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COVENANT HOUSE NEW ORLEANS

Board of directors
as of 3/3/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Deidre Hayes

Tulane University School of Social Work

Term: 2020 -

Katie Harvill

Matchstick Creative

Christian Rhodes

Roedel Parsons

Martha Landrum

Greater New Orleans Foundation

Kristen Palmer

New Orleans City Council

Christian Fauria-Robinson

Ochsner Medical Center

David Krebs

Krebs, Farley & Dry

Deidre Hayes

Tulane University School of Social Work

Derrick Martin

Sugchairo, Moi & Martin Economic Advisory Services

Eric Alexander

Marsh & McLennan Companies

Gene Simon

BIS Services, LLC

Gregor Fox

Heather Doyle

Jake Kleinmahon

Ochsner Hospital for Children

Karen Kearney

Intralox

Lance Africk

U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana

Luis Zervigon

Crescent Capital Consulting

Marc Behar

American Chiropractic Clinic

Paula Brown

State of Louisiana Court of Appeal, Fourth Circuit

Peter Wilson

Roth Law Firm

Tawana Ewing

St. Thomas Community Health Center

Thelma French

otal Community Action, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/03/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data