PLATINUM2024

Georgia Center for Child Advocacy, Inc.

Building a Better World, One Child at a Time

Mission

The Georgia Center for Child Advocacy was established as a private, non-profit agency in 1987. The Center's purpose is to champion the needs of sexually and severely physically abused children through prevention, intervention, therapy and collaboration.  The mission is accomplished by conducting forensic interviews and evaluations, psychological treatment and crisis counseling, educating other professionals about child sexual abuse, and facilitating coordinated service between the public agencies involved in the investigation, prosecution, and treatment for each child we serve.

Ruling year info

1988

CEO

Sheila Ryan

Main address

P.O. Box 11270 SW

Atlanta, GA 30310-0270 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Georgia Center for Children, Inc.

EIN

58-1762069

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Other Mental Health, Crisis Intervention N.E.C. (F99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

According to National statistics, 1 in 10 children will be sexually abused before age 18. Even more alarming is the fact that less than 10% of these children will ever tell a sole. Without proper treatment, these problems can lead to far more detrimental behaviors during adolescence and adulthood, which become a problem for the entire community. Children who experience child abuse and neglect are 59% more likely to be arrested as a juvenile, 28% more likely to be arrested as an adult, and 30% more likely to commit violent crime. These facts and statistics point to the importance of early intervention and treatment to minimize both the immediate trauma and the long-term negative impact on a child victim’s healthy emotional development as well as the negative impact on their community. Children are the most vulnerable population, and giving those that have been affected by abuse hope for a normal childhood is something that every child deserves.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Intervention/Victim Advocacy/Treatment

Our services are coordinated with law enforcement and DFCS to address issues of physical or sexual abuse of children as well as providing services to children who may have witnessed violence. These agencies may request a forensic interview be conducted at the Georgia Center for Child Advocacy.

Our interviewers are all highly trained and conduct interviews that are legally sound and of a fact finding nature. Both before and after the interview, staff will meet with the caretaker or guardian who has brought the child to the center.

We offer follow up victim advocacy services to the child and family, and remain involved for as long as necessary.
At the Center we offer therapy that is specialized for children who have experienced some type of trauma. This type of therapy is called Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT).  

This treatment assists the caregivers and children to recognize problems resulting from the earlier trauma; to learn skills for managing troubling thoughts, feelings and behaviors; to learn relaxation skills; and to learn ways to cope with difficult memories.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Georgia’s Prevention Initiative starts with the premise that adults are responsible for the safety of children. But many adults feel unable to protect children from sexual abuse because they do not know enough about the problem or the steps they can take to reduce the risk.

We offer the Stewards of Children training curriculum throughout Georgia. This training is a revolutionary sexual abuse prevention training program developed by a Charleston, SC based nonprofit, Darkness to Light (D2L)(http://www.d2l.org/)  and is the only adult-focused, evidence-based curriculum proven to increase knowledge and attitudes about child sexual abuse and to change behaviors promoting protective factors.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of children who have received forensic interviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Intervention/Victim Advocacy/Treatment

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of people trained to prevent child sexual abuse

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Child Sexual Abuse Prevention

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We champion the needs of sexually and severely physically abused children through prevention, intervention, therapy and collaboration. The children we serve have experienced various forms of abuse such as sexual abuse or assault, physical abuse, and exploitation. We see children who witness extreme violence and homicide, and also ones who are victims of trafficking and child pornography. Ultimately, our goal is to respond as immediately as possible to the needs of child victims to reduce the impact of their trauma, and provide them with the tools to succeed beyond our walls. By offering wraparound services, we are building a better world, one child at a time.

As a child advocacy center, we serve as an interagency coordinated response center to combat the long-lasting effects of child trauma. Our approach enables the kids we serve of all ages to find safety, feel protected, and move forward to lead a healthy childhood. We are the only agency conducting forensic interviews for child victims in DeKalb county and only one of two doing so in Fulton. A forensic interview gives the child an opportunity to share their account with a trained professional in a safe environment, is video-recorded, and is later used during prosecution. We partner with GBI to educate law enforcement officers how to effectively intervene with concerns of child sex trafficking.

We strengthened our response to child pornography & trafficking victims by not only having our staff trained, but also by sharing our knowledge & conducting targeted trainings to both adults & youth across our state. Our Envision Project conducts four distinct workshops to assist youth survivors of child sex trafficking; these address employment, personal development, independent living, and educational support. These programs help remove barriers so that survivors move forward, are equipped with skills & resources to thrive, and dream big. We conduct Love 146's Not a #Number directly to youth ages 12-18 designed to teach them how to project themselves from trafficking and exploitation. We have reached over 135,000 adults trained on child sexual abuse prevention 148 out of the 159 Georgia counties, and just began youth prevention education in schools this year. Our goal is to reach all Georgia counties and train 5% of every county population.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Georgia Center for Child Advocacy, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Georgia Center for Child Advocacy, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/03/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Vicki Kipreos

Community Volunteer

Term: 2024 - 2025

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 4/3/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/03/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.