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HUMANE SOCIETY OF LOUISIANA

New Orleans, LA   |  www.HumaneLa.org

Mission

We empower individuals and communities to create a no-kill state, where the lives of all animals matter.

Ruling year info

1997

Founder & Executive Director

Mr. Jeffrey N. Dorson

Main address

P.O. Box 740321

New Orleans, LA 70174 USA

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Formerly known as

LISA - Legislation in Support of Animals

LISA - League in Support of Animals

EIN

58-1795272

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

Disaster Preparedness and Relief Services (M20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Animals suffer and die senselessly across Louisiana every day. This tragic situation stems partly from a lack of education (our public school system consistently ranks among the very worst in the nation) partly from indifference and partly from socioeconomic conditions; nearly 1 in 5 Louisianians live in poverty. Louisiana is also gripped by violence; the state has had the nation's highest murder rate for decades. Widespread cruelty to animals - statistically linked to other crimes of violence - is consistent with that larger lack of respect for life. There is insufficient government and private funding to address this problem in the majority of our communities. The Humane Society of Louisiana works tirelessly to change the status quo. We strive to touch the hearts of our fellow citizens and to challenge our communities to do better. Our goal is to intervene to stop animal abuse, neglect and mistreatment and to create a more humane and compassionate state for everyone.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Cruelty Investigation & Prevention

Our agency receives thousands of complaints of animal abuse or neglect each year.  To aid animals in distress, we assist law enforcement officers by providing veterinary care and/or other assistance with cruelty cases. We take custody of seized animals in rural areas without shelters or animal control programs. We monitor cases through the court system and provide rewards to encourage leads in abuse and neglect cases. We act on calls from around the state and have had active cases and/or have provided support in these parishes over the last three years.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our 47 acre sanctuary in Mount Hermon is a home to abused and neglected horses. Our goal is to create a haven for animals of all kinds, which will also serve as a Disaster Relief Staging Ground for animals during emergencies. We intend to develop the sanctuary into a thriving regional education and volunteer center.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Pet overpopulation is a more serious and widespread problem in the rural South than it is in more affluent communities up north. As a result, there is often a demand for adoptable pets on the East Coast.  To prevent Louisiana animals from being needlessly destroyed, the Humane Society regularly operates cross-country pet adoption transports.  We match homeless animals from local shelters with adopters and private no-kill animal shelters.  Our work to place these animals with loving families reduces the burden on Louisiana's underfunded shelters. We save 1500 homeless animals annually through this program.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Farm animals represent the largest population of animals routinely subjected to cruel and inhumane treatment.  Since consuming vegan food helps reduce the suffering of animals, the Humane Society of Louisiana educates people about cruelty-free food choices. The organization has educated people about the health, humane and environmental benefits of the vegan lifestyle since 1988. We previously hosted the annual NOLA Veggie Fest, sponsored the Bayou Veg Fest and hold many educational events to promote compassionate choices each year. (Our community programs in this area have been on hold for the past years due to Covid and major disasters in our state.)

Population(s) Served
Adults
People with diseases and illnesses

Our agency works to protect animals in harm's way during disasters and to bring aid to animals and rescue groups in need. During the aftermath of Katrina, with the support of more than 500 volunteers, we facilitated the rescue and care of close to 2000 animals. We also coordinated the donation and distribution of food, supplies and equipment to scores of shelters and rescue groups across the region.  We have since participated in multiple relief efforts. Most recently, in 2016, we led rescue and relief efforts in Livingston Parish, during Louisiana's Great Flood. We were also active in Hurricane Harvey relief efforts in 2017, helping to transport more than 700 animals out of harm's way. We are creating a 'Disaster Relief Staging Ground' at our Enoch J. Donaldson Animal Sanctuary, so that we can better assist in future disasters.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Emergency responders

In 2017, we initiated a program to save the lives of carnival parade horses in New Orleans. For decades - to meet the demand for horses at Mardi Gras - animals have been leased for parades and sold back to horse brokers after the festivities. Tragically, after the celebration, the animals faced an uncertain fate and potential slaughter in Mexico. For the past two years, we've successfully saved the lives of all of these magnificent horses. 19 animals were saved in 2018; 17 horses were adopted in 2017.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Animal Friendliest Shelter 2007

Animal Fair Magazine

Foolanthropy Charity 2005

Motley Fool

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Humane Society of Louisiana is not a typical shelter or rescue organization. While we save and help thousands of individual animals each year, our unique focus is on big picture solutions. Our aim is to manifest systemic changes that will result in more lives saved and less abuse tolerated. As we rescue, defend and speak out for individual animals, our goal is both to increase services and funding for animal protection programs and to encourage kindness and compassion.

We're working to transform our state into a kinder place by:
1. Expanding animal protection programs. We have started and/or aided dozens of shelters/rescues in our state. We have instituted lifesaving programs like TransPUPtation, in which we partner with rural shelters to save homeless dogs and cats. We created the state's 'Animal Friendly License Plate' and Pet Overpopulation Advisory Council to provide grants to shelters and rescues. We've provided disaster relief services in areas where animals would have otherwise perished.
2. Improving laws at the state and local levels: we have drafted and passed dozens of laws to aid animals.
3. Expanding enforcement action by partnering with law enforcement.
4. Promoting kindness and compassion: Through outreach and educational activities and media appearances, we are relentless promoters of cruelty-free lifestyles and humane values.

We have skilled, experienced leaders with proven track records of success. Our founder and key staffers have collectively dedicated more than 100 years of service to animals in Louisiana. Our nonprofit is also a licensed private detective agency, which gives us a unique advantage and credibility in working with law enforcement agencies. After 30 years in the operation, we have a wealth of knowledge, contacts and a profound understanding of the problems facing animals in this state. We work with legislators, community leaders, animal shelters and funders to get results. We are working to expand our infrastructure to maximize our fundraising potential, so that we can magnify our impact in years to come.

From humble beginnings, we've grown into a respected statewide organization with deep connections in Louisiana. We've passed more than a dozen laws, shut down inhumane backyard breeders, infiltrated dog fighting rings, neutered more than 40,000 cats and dogs and rescued/aided hundreds of thousands of animals. We've staged massive disaster relief efforts, held hundreds of outreach and awareness events, conducted thousands of media interviews, won lawsuits to stop abusive practices and more. We are currently focused on opening our statewide Cruelty Investigations Headquarters in the Greater New Orleans area and on training in the next generation of leaders. We are also raising funds to expand our 47 acre Enoch J. Donaldson Animal Sanctuary, which is currently a home for rescued horses. Our goal is to make it a haven for animals of all kinds, as well as an educational center which will serve the region for years to come.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

HUMANE SOCIETY OF LOUISIANA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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HUMANE SOCIETY OF LOUISIANA

Board of directors
as of 12/04/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Dana Dell Nesbitt

Dana Dell Nesbitt

President

Jeffrey Norman Dorson

Founder / Treasurer

Michael Perry

ICorp

Leah Duncan Moorman

Greenheart, Products of Peace

Dr. Michele Johnson

Cheri Deatsch

Vice President / Attorney at Law

Rena Sweeney

Alchemy Events

Evie Burguieres

Attorney at Law

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/12/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data