JERUSALEM HOUSE INC

Housing is Healthcare

Atlanta, GA   |  http://www.jerusalemhouse.org

Mission

Jerusalem House provides homeless and low-income individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS in Greater Atlanta with a continuum of housing options, supportive services, and educational opportunities that contribute to a resident’s overall self-sufficiency.

Notes from the nonprofit

In fiscal year 2020, 90 cents of every dollar donated to Jerusalem House was spent on programs.

Ruling year info

1989

President and CEO

Maryum Lewis

Main address

17 Executive Park Drive NE Suite 290

Atlanta, GA 30329 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-1829807

NTEE code info

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

AIDS (G81)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Everyone affected by HIV/AIDS will have access to a caring home that improves health outcomes and extends quality lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program For Adults

23 individual efficiency apartments backing onto an historic mansion containing shared common areas serving 23 formerly homeless single adults with AIDS

Population(s) Served
People with HIV/AIDS
Adults

12 one, two and three bedroom apartments on a campus with a Learning Center and common areas.

Serves 12 HIV+, formerly homeless single mothers or fathers and their children

Population(s) Served
People with HIV/AIDS
Children and youth

20 apartments "scattered" across metro Atlanta

Serves 32 formerly homeless individuals with HIV/AIDS and their families

Population(s) Served
People with HIV/AIDS
Homeless people

200+ housing units "scattered" across metro Atlanta

This program allows us to serve not only homeless, but also low-income, individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS

Population(s) Served
People with HIV/AIDS
Economically disadvantaged people

Serves individuals who are low-income with HIV/AIDS.

Independent living through TBRA – tenant-based rental assistance – that temporarily helps pay a portion of the cost of monthly rent to the clients enrolled in the New Horizons program. The lease and utilities are in the primary participant’s name.

Population(s) Served
People with HIV/AIDS
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Awards

Magnolia Award for Special Achievement in Affordable Housing in the Special Needs and Superior Design categories 2005

Georgia Department of Community Affairs

Absolute Service Award 2002

Absolute Care

Georgia Volunteer Fundraiser of the Year to JH Founder Evelyn Ullman 2002

Metropolitan Atlanta Chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals

IMPACT Award - Jerusalem House Family Program 2001

Metro Atlanta Corporate Volunteer Council

Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Service Award 2001

Emory University Schools of Public Health, Nursing and Business

Community Partner Award 2015

Wells Fargo

IMPACT award finalist 2007

Metro Atlanta Corporate Volunteer Council

Blue Flame Award 2015

Georgia Natural Gas

Community Partner Award 2014

Wells Fargo

Community Partner Award 2013

Wells Fargo

Community Partner Award 2012

Wells Fargo

Community Partner Award 2011

Wells Fargo

Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Service Award 2018

Emory - Rollins School of Public Health

Top Performer Award (Family Program) 2019

Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge & the City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Resilience

Top Performer for Energy Conservation (Program for Adults) 2018

Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge & the City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Resilience

Top Performers for Energy Conservation (Family and Adult Programs) 2016

Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge & the City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Resilience

The Allen Award – John A. Conant Community Service Award 2014

Atlanta Interfaith Broadcasters, Inc.

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percent of residents who will experience viral suppression.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

People with HIV/AIDS

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

90% of Jerusalem House residents have achieved viral suppression compared to 65% of adults and adolescents with HIV in the US.

Number of residents served annually

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The goals of our 2021-2025 strategic plan are:
1 Improve the health and quality of life of people with HIV/AIDS.
2 Jerusalem House residents can get where they need to go when they need to go there in an independent manner.
3 Become less reliant on City of Atlanta and HOPWA funding by increasing private funding.
4 Raise the profile of Jerusalem House among key target audiences.
5 Continue to build the ability of our board and staff to deliver our mission.

Goal 1
A: Provide affordable, flexible housing options close to transit and accessible to services.
B: Assure optimal care for residents.
C: Offer a full complement of programming for residents.
D: Continue to evaluate the outcomes of all programs.

Goal 2
A: Track and understand the number of requests for transportation made by residents (to staff).
B: During FY2023, conduct research to consider creating a fund to cover the cost of independent transportation for residents, based on needs.
C: During FY2024, launch a fundraising campaign to establish a fund if found to be viable.

Goal 3
A: Focus on the “top 50” prospective major donors.
B: Increase the revenue from a signature event to $200,000 each year by the end of FY2024.
C: Increase the amount received from foundations by the end of FY2025 to $1.2 million.
D: Increase the number of corporate financial donors from 10 to 20 by the end of FY2022.
E: By November 30, 2021, develop a strategy for a $1.2 million special campaign that will be completed by the end of FY2023.
F: Promote team- and peer-to-peer fundraising opportunities for involvement that benefit our organization.
G: Periodically revisit ownership of the property at 1500 N Decatur.

Goal 4
A: Dramatically increase our presence among our target audiences.
B: Create the internal infrastructure necessary to segment our database during FY2022.
C: Explore the addition of honorary board members to engage high-profile supporters, including city leaders and elected officials.

Goal 5
A: Build our board to be a leading, best-in-class model among Atlanta nonprofits.
B: Offer professional development, care services and self-care for staff.
C: Conduct job description/responsibility review every two years.
D: Review employee benefits and implement timeline for changes.
E: Build long-term financial sustainability through reserves.

Jerusalem House is Atlanta's largest provider of permanent supportive housing for homeless and low-income individuals and families affected by HIV disease.

The agency is highly regarded by community and government funding sources and has been called upon by HUD and the GA Department of Community Affairs to provide technical assistance to new nonprofit organizations. Emory University uses Jerusalem House as part of the curriculum for the Humphries Fellows Program.

Jerusalem House maintains 25 written collaborative agreements with various community agencies to provide supportive services to program participants.

Over 45% of the program staff has been with the agency for over five years providing program participants with continuity. Jerusalem House is guided by a dedicated group of community leaders committed to our mission.

Our all-volunteer Board of Directors includes individuals with expertise in a wide variety of areas, including legal, real estate, and finance.

As the face of HIV/AIDS has changed, the agency has evolved. Jerusalem House began in 1989 as a single house for 5 people dying from AIDS. It became the Program for Adults, still serving single adults, some of whom have been living with AIDS for 20+ years. Our Family Program, Georgia's first to serve single HIV+ mothers and their children, marks its 20th year in 2017. From 2018, it also admits single fathers and their children. The Scattered Site master lease programs allow us to serve any individual/family combination of persons affected by HIV/AIDS, housing residents in apartment complexes "scattered" all over Atlanta. In 2015, we launched a tenant-based rental subsidy program, which helps HIV+ low-income apartment/house leaseholders maintain their housing.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    All Jerusalem House residents are homeless or living at or below 300% of the poverty level as determined by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) guidelines and all adult residents have either a HIV or AIDS diagnosis, depending on the program. Approximately 90% earn less than $25,000 per year. In 2020, approximately 92% of the residents served were African American, 44% were female, 35% were members of the LGBTQ community, 28% were children 17 or under, and 39% had a mental health diagnosis.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Throughout COVID, we have reached out to our residents to ascertain what else they may need to help them better get through the COVID19 pandemic. In response to their results, we have implemented many programs to support the staff. These include virtual mental health services, distribution of PPE, resources for food, and virtual support groups.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The "feedback loop" has been an integrated part of the work that Jerusalem House has done for over twenty years. Our goal has always been to support and empower those we serve.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

JERUSALEM HOUSE INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

JERUSALEM HOUSE INC

Board of directors
as of 07/08/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Michael McCoy

Truist

Term: 2024 - 2022

Monique Quindsland, C.P.A., Treasurer

Frazier & Deeter, LLC

Jonathan Tucker, C.P.A.

KBKG

V Scott

KPMG LLP

Mike McCoy, Vice President

SunTrust now Truist

Stephanie Laster

Former resident

David McEachern

Keller Williams Realty

Joe Royals, Vice President

Truist

Beth Espy, Secretary

City of Atlanta Police Dept.

Dena Hasty

MARTA

Matthew Kent, Immediate Past President

Alston & Bird

Brett Haynie

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Matthew Mills

Wells Fargo

Micah Moon

Delta Air Lines, Inc.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/8/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/11/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.