CEED

We believe in People and their ability to SucCEED!

aka Center for Economic Empowerment and Development   |   Fayetteville, NC   |  www.ncceed.org

Mission

The Center for Economic Empowerment and Development (CEED, formerly Women's Center of Fayetteville) is a nonprofit with a thirty year history of serving individuals and families in Cumberland County, N. C. and the surrounding counties. CEED currently runs three programs: New Choices, Women's Business Center, and CEED Capital. New Choices provides rental housing for moderate income individuals or families combined with financial literacy and resource referrals to assist clients in establishing a solid future. Assistance through Women's Business Center and CEED Capital provide business and financial support services to women and disadvantaged business owners throughout the region and state. CEED works with other nonprofits and agencies for the betterment of women and disadvantage folks.

Ruling year info

1990

Executive Director

Ms. Suzy Hrabovsky

Main address

230 Hay Street

Fayetteville, NC 28301 USA

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EIN

58-1873977

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Economic Development (S30)

Management & Technical Assistance (J02)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

WBCFAY Women's Business Center

Women’s Business Center of Fayetteville is a program of CEED (Center for Economic Empowerment & Development), funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the Small Business Administration (SBA). The Office of Women’s Business Ownership’s mission is to establish and oversee a network of Women’s Business Centers (WBCs) throughout the United States and its territories. Through the management and technical assistance provided by the WBCs, entrepreneurs – especially women who are economically or socially disadvantaged – are offered comprehensive training and counseling on a vast array of topics to help clients start and grow their own businesses.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Women and girls

The New Choices program was established to assist individuals and families in the low to moderate income socio economic status that are unable to get assistance through other supported agencies. A self sufficiency program includes providing a rental house or apartment below FMR in the area. The clients are then part of a program to assist in financial literacy and job/ career support through other resources and referral partnerships.

Population(s) Served
Social and economic status

CEED’s Capital Loan program helps inexperienced and less qualified borrowers get ‘Access to Capital’ which would not be available through the traditional banking system. (Some cases may require collateral which is valued at liquidation or trade-in prices). We can obtain these types of loans for our clients. CEED’s Capital Loan Program provides a bridge to start-up and existing small businesses that assists with job creation and retention helping them to provide a positive economic impact in our community. CEED provides loan amounts from $2,500 up to $200,000. Loan limits will be based on the business needs and/or any other ILP outstanding loans. * Based upon the availability of funds*

Population(s) Served
Social and economic status
Sexual identity

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Our mission is to serve women and minority, as well as other socio econimically challenged individuals and families in our community.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To provide economic impact data to funding and support organizations, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We were able to secure program funding and partnership with the City of Fayetteville Government to establish a fund for micro businesses that were denied access to COVID funding from EIDL and PPP due to low credit scores. We provided over 70 loans from $2500 to $5000. 96% of those businesses were minority owned businesses in our community.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve,

Financials

CEED
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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CEED

Board of directors
as of 2/21/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Trish Taris

KW Realty

Term: 2019 - 2021


Board co-chair

Dr. Caroline Glacken

Fayetteville State University

Term: 2019 - 2021

Gordon Johnson

Gordon Johnson Architecture

Frederick Cutter

Andrew O'Quinn

Thompson & Little

William Drewry

Edward Jones

Shontae Johnson

KW Realty

Debbie Belles

Crystal McLean

First Citizens

Lynne Greene

Coldwell Realty

Lockett Tally

Tally & Tally

Lockett Tally

Tally & Tally

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/21/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.