Georgia Tree Council, Inc.

Sustaining Georgia's Green Legacy

Stone Mountain, GA   |  www.gatreecouncil.org

Mission

The mission of the Georgia Tree Council is to sustain Georgia's green legacy by partnering with individuals, organizations, and communities in raising awareness toward improving and maintaining Georgia's community forests.

Notes from the nonprofit

Georgia Tree Council is certified by the Standards for Excellence Institute.

Ruling year info

1993

Executive Director

Mary Lynne Beckley

Main address

6835 James B. Rivers Memorial Drive

Stone Mountain, GA 30083 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-2028386

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The vision of the Georgia Tree Council is that every Georgia community experiences the many benefits of healthy trees and a strong community forestry program. We work to educate communities that, as they plan and grow, they need to plan with trees in mind in their further development. Trees should be "at the table" at the very beginning of any discussion of further growth of a city. Our goal is to continue to grow our membership and program attendance to include anyone who has a stake in keeping trees vital and healthy in their community. We also aim to bring in more corporate, foundation, and individual support so that Georgia Tree Council is soon fully self-sustaining, should our state grant be discontinued in the future.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Quarterly Educational Programs, including statewide Annual Conference

GTC accomplishes its mission through quarterly educational meetings and workshops on cutting-edge urban forestry topics such as Basic Tree Care, Trees as Green Stormwater Infrastructure, Arborist Certification Review, and Invasive Species in the Urban Forest. Our signature event, the statewide Annual Conference brings together treekeepers from around the state for educational sessions and networking. The 2018 Annual Conference, for example, covered topics relating to "Creating Resilient Urban Forests." All of our programs provide continuing education credits for arborists, foresters, and Georgia-registered landscape architects.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The primary purpose of GTC’s Landmark and Historic Tree Register is to locate, document and compile a record of significant trees across Georgia. Landmark and Historic Trees are those individual trees and groups of trees that have been designated as significant based on their importance to national, state, or community history. They are frequently recognized for their contribution to the development of landscape architecture, forestry, city planning, and culture. Other key attributes for consideration are event association, aesthetic value, historical significance, and cultural contribution. Trees recognized in this register are divided into two categories: Landmark – those trees that are an integral part of an individual community and its heritage, and Historic – those trees in Georgia that are important to the culture and history of the state or nation. The register will also enhance our ability to educate and encourage the public and decision-makers about the importance of trees and the need to care for and protect them.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Each year GTC rewards individuals, organizations, businesses, municipalities, and counties for outstanding work in protecting and enhancing our community forests. One Grand Award is given to each of the following categories: Marketing, Streetscape Revitalization, Greenspace Plan, New Development, New Initiative, Business, Media, Civic Organization, Community, Elected/Appointed Official, Education, Individual Achievement, Student, and Urban Arboriculture. Award Recipients are honored at our annual awards luncheon at the statewide annual conferenece.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In April, 2011, tornadoes struck many southern U.S. states, taking lives and destroying homes, businesses, and city infrastructure – including thriving community trees. To help restore the many environmental, economic, and social health benefits that trees provided in these storm-struck Georgia communities, the Georgia Urban Forest Council (now the Georgia Tree Council), in cooperation with the Georgia Forestry Commission (GFC), established the Georgia ReLeaf program to bring urban forests back to life by planting trees in public areas such as parks, schools, main streets, and business districts.

In addition to tree planting for canopy restoration, the Georgia ReLeaf program also makes funding available for tree planting projects benefitting or involving our military veterans who have served our country and for community tree equity projects and for community tree equity projects.

Population(s) Served
Adults

This annual program is geared toward treekeepers at colleges, universities, schools, and any type of "campus" such as corporate or botanical garden campuses. Topics addressed are those relevant to treecare and advocacy at a campus. Example topics covered are best practices for communicating with your campus community about projects, tree management plans, planting trees in the right location, establishing an arboretum, and keeping people safe. Often, this educational event teaching basic practices such as tree planting and establishment, pruning, and caring for mature trees.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations


Since 2008

Awards

Certification 2008

Standards for Excellence

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of conference attendees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Quarterly Educational Programs, including statewide Annual Conference

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

These numbers reflect the number of virtual conference and workshop registrations in 2021. Many registrations are from repeat attendees.

Total number of organization members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We retain approximately 200-plus member contacts each year, including individuals, nonprofits, government, and businesses. Nonprofit, government and business memberships cover numerous individuals.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goal 1: Membership Growth: The Georgia Tree Council has a vibrant membership across the state.

Goal 2: Financial Growth: The Georgia Tree Council has diversified funding support.

Goal 3: Grow the Organization: The Georgia Tree Council has the staff and board to achieve its mission.

Our organization continues to make education, resources, and leadership available so that Georgia communities have the tools to bring the environmental, economic, and social benefits of healthy tree canopies to their citizens.

We have set realistic goals for our ourselves, taking into consideration our single staff member and board of directors' time and expertise.

During these past two years with the Covid pandemic, we have offered virtual education programs and continuing tree planting grant funding to communities across Georgia. The silver lining with the new online programming is that we reach a wider audience, bringing in attendees from not only Georgia, but across the country, and around the world. Our audience has definitely expanded.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    All citizens of Georgia. Our vision is that every Georgia community experiences the many benefits of healthy trees and a strong community forestry program.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Georgia Tree Council, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Georgia Tree Council, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 1/21/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

David Shostak

Arborist, City of Alpharetta

Term: 2022 - 2022


Board co-chair

Holly Campbell

University of Georgia

Term: 2022 - 2022

Joan Scales

Georgia Forestry Commission, ex officio

Jessie McClellan

New Urban Forestry

Thomas Brown

W.M. Whitaker & Associates Landscape Architects

Seth Hawkins

Georgia Forestry Commission, ex officio

Matt Malament

InterContinental Hotels Group

Yeliann Montanez

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Dan Whitehead

HortSource

Mark Wilies

Wiles Forest Management

Alex Ballard

Georgia Forestry Commission

Jamie Blackburn

Arborguard Tree Specialists

Lea Clark

Georgia Forestry Commission

Michael Glisson

Macon-Bibb County

Jessica Pollard

Georgia Power Company

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/21/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/21/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.