Housing Initiative of North Fulton, Inc.

Temporary Housing - Permanent Solutions

aka HomeStretch   |   Roswell, GA   |  www.homestretch.org

Mission

HomeStretch guides working homeless families with minor children in North Metro Atlanta toward increased self-reliance and stability by providing life skills education, mentoring and supportive housing.

Ruling year info

1994

Executive Director

Ms. Rose J. Burton

Main address

89 Grove Way

Roswell, GA 30075 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-2051038

NTEE code info

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

Financial Counseling, Money Management (P51)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Fulton County Consolidated Plan 2015- 2019 states the most frequently cited primary reason as to why people become homeless is the economic factor. Families served by HomeStretch have a history of homelessness and have multiple evictions resulting in severe housing related debt from apartment rental agencies, courts and utility companies which impact their ability to obtain a lease thus continuing the vicious cycle of transiency and homelessness. HomeStretch addresses the financial challenges of a single mother, suburbanization of poverty, housing cost burdens, low wages, temporary or seasonal employment and lack of financial literacy especially the skill of managing a budget, paying down debt, cleaning up a credit report and handling parental stress. HomeStretch builds self-esteem in all family members by creating increments of success throughout their participation in the Homestretch program.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

HomeStretch Supportive Housing Program

The HomeStretch Supportive Housing Program promotes stability for working homeless families in 4 key areas: housing, employment, finances and family. We accomplish this by providing life skills education, mentoring, case management with experienced social workers and temporary housing.

Population(s) Served

Homestretch provides affordable low income housing to Homestretch graduates and community members.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Quality Enhancement Standards and Support Training (QESST) 2010

Georgia Alliance to End Homelessness

HUD Award of Excellence - Top 100 Community Housing Organizations in US 2001

US Department of Housing and Urban Development

Quality Enhancement Standards and Support Training (QESST) 2013

Georgia Alliance to End Homelessness

Quality Enhancement Standards and Support Training (QESST) 2015

Georgia Coalition to End Homelessness

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

HomeStretch Supportive Housing Program

Context Notes

Client participants consist of number of parents and children served in the Homestretch Supportive Housing Program.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal for all clients is to end homelessness by becoming successful money managers, increasing their earned income and attaining stable affordable permanent housing upon completion of the program. The HomeStretch program is based on the foundational principle of stability. HomeStretch guides families and measures progress in four key areas of stability supported by Case Management, Mentoring, LifeSkills Education and Affordable, Supportive Housing. Following are the overall HomeStretch goals to be achieved by area of stability.
Stable Families-
1. 80% of families in program will successfully engage in both Adult Life Skills Education Classes and Youth Development.
2. 80% of families will experience healthy relationships with the HomeStretch Volunteer Mentors.
3. 80% of families will achieve tracked progress on the individualized Family Development Plan (FDP), a comprehensive, unique plan that guides families toward stability.

Stable Housing-
1. 80% of families who exit the program during the Fiscal Year will secure stable housing. 80% of families will pay rent monthly while in program.
2. 80% of families will maintain the HomeStretch apartment at an acceptable level (passed monthly inspections).

Stable Employment-
1. 80% of families in program will be employed full time (35 hours per week).
2. 80% of families identified in the individualized Family Development Plan with a goal to increase wages will increase wages during the program year.
3. 80% of families in program will work with an individual job coach as part of Family Development Plan.

Stable Finances-
1. 80% of families will maintain a bank account.
2. 80% of families will improve income to expense ratio.
3. 80% of families will increase income.
4. 80% of families will decrease debt.

HomeStretch will use the following strategies to achieve the goals.
1. Supportive housing- Each family is housed in a 2 or 3 bedroom for 12 to 24 months. The family unit is stocked with linens, cookware, food pantry items, computer, appropriate bedroom furniture for the children and adults, living room and dining furniture. Most families arrive without furniture, linens, food and often clothing. When they exit the program, they are able to take furniture and supplies with them to start in their new home. HomeStretch owns 23 supportive housing family units and operates one additional unit which is leased for $1.00 a month, which is suitable for a large family.

2. Case management- A professional social worker is assigned to each family and together they develop a Family Development Plan. The Plan identifies individual and program goals and measurements which are used to identify and track progress toward outcomes. Case workers conduct assessments, coordinate referrals, participate and supervise budget and family mentors, recruit employment coaches, and identify resources for emergency and family services.

3. Financial literacy- this service is intertwined in every aspect of the HomeStretch program since a characteristic of most homeless families is lack of knowledge and experience in budgeting or money management which has resulted in not paying bills on time, increasing debt and incurring numerous evictions. Over 50% of Life Skill classes focus on financial literacy with a goal of creating self-sufficient people.

4. Life Skills Education for adults- Classes are held bimonthly with skilled facilitators who provide in-depth training and support on financial management, expense analysis, how to save, how to improve your job and increase income, how to parent and provide suitable environment for your children etc. The workshops provide an interactive learning environment where families acquire strategies to improve decision-making skills, build confidence, enrich their family units and improve employability skills.

5. Life Skills Education for youth- Children are greatly impacted by homelessness, transiency, and changing schools. Professional youth counselors conduct life skill sessions on anger management, conflict resolution, peer pressure etc. Professional and volunteer tutors help the youth improve academically. Paid internships and scholarships are arranged for the older youth to help them prepare for college and future employment.

6. Mentoring- Each family is assigned a Budget Mentor who meets regularly with client and caseworker to construct a maintainable budget, devise a plan for debt reduction, discuss financial challenges and track results. Each family is also provided a Family Mentor who serves as a life coach and adviser and provides support, guidance, and encouragement to all the family members.

HomeStretch has a long history of successfully impacting homeless families and guiding them to a life of independence and self sufficiency. HomeStretch began in 1991 when volunteers at the local non-profits and churches realized the need for affordable housing in the North Fulton area. An increasing number of at-risk families had started applying for housing assistance but the local charities could only offer emergency short-term aid. Considering best practices, HomeStretch was formed. Since 1994, HomeStretch has grown to own and operate 39 family units which are allocated to 23 for the Supportive Housing Program and 16 for the Affordable Housing Program. Historically, we have achieved an 80% success rate of creating self-sufficiency and stabilizing families to maintain permanent housing for at least one year after exiting the program. Excellent grant management and proven outcomes have resulted in continued support from Federal, State and County agencies, private foundations, United Way, corporations, faith-based partners and individuals. Extensive community partners and over 1,800 volunteers per year have helped families achieve their goals and become productive community members.

In 2018, Homestretch will celebrate 25 years of serving homeless families in North Metro Atlanta.

Mission focused: Homestretch is celebrating 25 years of serving homeless families in 2018. During this time, the agency has been governed by a strong Board of Directors who operate from a Strategic Plan and measure results. Families Served: HomeStretch has served 274 unduplicated clients consisting of 93 adults and 181 children since 2012. Most families consist of a single mother with minor children but we also serve married couples and single fathers who meet the eligibility criteria. Over 1,000 clients have been served since inception with 80% success rate for remaining stably housed after one year since.
Housing Success: In 1996 HomeStretch acquired it's first owned housing unit. Since then, we have purchased or acquired a total of 39 housing units consisting of 2 or 3 bedroom duplexes, triplexes, townhomes, condominiums, one single family home and one 8-unit apartment building. In FY 2016-17 HomeStretch reallocated its 39 housing units to expand the Affordable Housing Program for HomeStretch graduates and for low-income community members. Current program now consists of: 23 Supportive Housing Program Program Success- Five Year Average: Indicator 1: Stable Housing
- % of families who exited the program during the FY secured stable- 91%
- % of families paid rent monthly while in program- 91%
- % of families maintained the HomeStretch apartment at an acceptable level (passed monthly inspections)- 92%
Indicator 2: Stable Employment 5 Year Average
- % of families in program were employed full time- 92%
- % of families in program increased wages during the program year- 74%
- % of families worked with an individual job coach as part of FDP- 55%
Indicator 3: Stable Finances 5 Year Average
- % of families maintained a bank account- 96%
- % of families improved income to expense ratio- 81%
- % of families increased income- 82%
- % of families decreased debt- 83%
Indicator 4: Stable Family 5 Year Average
- % of families in program successfully engaged in both Adult Life Skills Education Classes and Youth LifeSkills/Youth Development Classes- 95%
- % of families experienced healthy relationships with the HS Volunteer Mentors- 91%
- % of families achieved tracked progress on the Family Development Plan (FDP), a comprehensive, unique plan that guides families toward stability- 89% Community Impact- Homestretch has transformed a blighted crime ridden community of Millbrook Circle into a beautiful cul-de-sac neighborhood with a community garden, playground, outdoor pergola, BBQ area for families plus a basketball and sports are for youth. All other properties have also been transformed into attractive and safe low-income housing.

Financials

Housing Initiative of North Fulton, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Housing Initiative of North Fulton, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 04/29/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Kurt Hilbert

Hilbert Law Firm, LLC.

Term: 2017 - 2018


Board co-chair

Mrs. Gina Hutchins

UPS, Inc.

Term: 2017 - 2018

Robert Hagan

Sterling Healthcare, Inc.

Darrin Cohen

Wealth Enhancement & Preservation of Georgia

Kendra Plotkin

Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce

Peter Tarantino

CPA Tarantino, LLC

Greg Solheim

Solheim Management One, LLC

Kurt Hilbert

The Hilbert Law Firm, LLC

Ken Allen

HP Corporation

Susan Busch

Roswell Presbyterian Church

Patty Conard

Legacy Financial Advisors

Gina Hutchins

UPS, Inc.

Brockton L. Patterson

US Trust

Joe Lain

Choate Construction Company

Ken Swanson

St. David's Episcopal Church

Nathan Weyer

KeyBank Institutional R/E Group

Rachelle Thornhill

The Snap Dish

Sarah J. Boyd

RBC

Tania Trumble

Gilroy, Bailey, Trumble, LLC

Daniel Fleming

St. Andrew Catholic Church

Lynn Adcock

RUMC (Retired)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes