Atlanta Court Appointed Special Advocates, Inc.

Serving All of Fulton County's Abused and Neglected Children

Atlanta, GA   |  http://www.atlantacasa.org/

Mission

The mission of Atlanta Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), Inc. is: To educate the community and to recruit, train and supervise court appointed volunteers to advocate for the best interest, safety and permanent placement of abused and neglected children in foster care within Fulton County, Georgia.

Notes from the nonprofit

So many things have changed, including our name, now Atlanta Court Appointed Special Advocates! But one thing that hasn’t changed is our dedication to ensure foster children achieve permanency in a safe and loving forever home. Even during a pandemic, our program has been able to pivot in order to serve children and families in a different way. We continue to advocate in the best interest of our children and to ensure they have a voice as they travel the road to a forever home. By being that consistent and caring adult, our staff has been able to support our volunteers who have been the certainty in uncertain times for the children we serve. The determination of staff and the volunteers have truly inspired our team and I hope it inspires you.

Ruling year info

1997

Executive Director

Ms. Robbyn Ingram

Main address

Judge Romae Powell Juvenile Justice Center 395 Pryor St. Suite 4116

Atlanta, GA 30312 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Fulton County Court Appointed Special Advocates Inc

EIN

58-2330915

NTEE code info

Child Abuse, Prevention of (I72)

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There is a need to advocate for abused and neglected children in Fulton County's court system. The court system can be very difficult for families to navigate. The average child will spend more than two years in foster care and those children will change homes an average of three times. Thus, Atlanta CASA provides the support to ensure that children and families do not get lost in the overburdened legal and social service system or languish in foster care. With the onset of COVID-19, Atlanta CASA has been resilient to ensure it continues its mission of advocacy. In its most pivotal moments, Atlanta CASA implemented virtual advocacy by becoming "phy-gital" (physically digital) in order to continue child visits. CASA services are based on a national, standards-based, replicable model that utilizes screened and trained community volunteers to provide individualized advocacy for children and families involved in juvenile court dependency proceedings as the result of abuse and neglect.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Atlanta CASA

Our programs seek to find safe and permanent homes for young victims in foster care (age 0 – 18) as quickly as possible while ensuring that all of the child’s needs are met for healthy development. As a result, it has become an integral part of the child­ welfare system.
WE ACCOMPLISH OUR MISSION BY • Training and recruiting volunteers to serve as Court Appointed Special Advocates • Supervising volunteers through Advocacy Coordinators • Advocating for abused and neglected children in the court system • Building awareness and support in the local, national and global community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Onward Upward is a curriculum designed to give volunteers a solid base of knowledge and skills to advocate on behalf of youths between the ages of 12 and 18. The training provides an in­ depth exploration of topics such as relationship building with older youths, the "possible selves" concept, and working with youths as partners in transition and independent living planning. This type of training has and continues to be effective in supporting youths that age out of foster care.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Non-adult children

Education Advocacy is an initiative by the Atlanta CASA program to ensure the specialized needs of children in foster care are properly addressed through placement changes. Advocates are trained to identify and address impediments to education such as learning disabilities, misdiagnosis, and other special needs. Advocates are trained in the Federal Laws impacting children's educational needs and services. Advocates participate in educational meetings and court hearings advocating for the needs necessary to produce the best outcomes for children.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Non-adult children

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of abused and neglected children served.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Atlanta CASA

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Atlanta CASA was able to ensure 8 adoptions and 6 reunifications through the advocacy of its volunteers. In addition, Atlanta CASA was able to successfully pivot in its advocacy to virtual.

Number of new Volunteer Advocates trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Atlanta CASA

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of Volunteer Advocacy

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Atlanta CASA

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Last year CASA volunteers contributed 62160 advocacy hours on behalf of child victims. Their efforts saved the county $1,580,729.00.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

It is the goal of Atlanta CASA to ensure that children who have been abused and neglected find a safe and permanent home as expeditiously as possible. Atlanta CASA strives to reunite the child with its biological family. Therefore, the focus is to identify any needs of the family, any gaps in services, and ensure that the family has an opportunity to have their children returned home. In the Atlanta CASA service area, during state fiscal year 2020 and in the midst of a pandemic, Atlanta CASA provided volunteer advocates for approximately 1/3 of the abused and neglected children age 18 and under referred to foster care. To achieve the goal of providing a volunteer advocate for every child, we have to triple our volunteer base. With our loyal supporters, community and partners, Atlanta CASA is committed to achieving this goal over the next 5 years.

Increase number of children served and permanency outcomes by ....
I. Increased fundraising and diversify funding streams
II. Increase organizational capacity and infrastructure
III. Increased volunteer recruitment and retention
IV. Increased staff recruitment and retention
V. Build Community, Court and DFACS relationships

Atlanta CASA is governed by a diverse, volunteer group of leaders who are committed to CASA's mission. The paid CASA staff are educated professionals; the Executive Director, Program Administrator, Director of Programs, Community Outreach Coordinator, Training Coordinator, Engagement Coordinator, and a team of Advocacy Coordinators. The Community Outreach Coordinator is the initial face of Atlanta CASA in the community. This position recruits for volunteers. The Training Coordinator is responsible for ensuring candidates meet the requirements to becoming an Advocate by overseeing the 40-hour training workshops as well as facilitating additional in-service training opportunities as required by our national organization. The Advocacy Coordinators provide volunteer advocates with on-going professional support, consultation and supervision. The duties of the Advocacy Coordinators include but are not limited to providing background and contact information on cases, recommending alternatives in complicated cases, reviewing written court reports, and documenting the activities and progress of the cases. The Director of Programs supervises the Advocacy Coordinators, documents service deliveries for monthly and quarterly statistical reports and supports the Executive Director as needed. The Engagement Coordinator ensures the sustainability of the volunteers and offers support for continued advocacy. Each of the foregoing ensures that the Executive Director and Program Manager have the information needed to ensure resources are in place for successful operations. Atlanta CASA is affiliated with both the National CASA Association and Georgia CASA.

Foster children with CASA volunteers are four times as likely to graduate from high school. Children who have CASA volunteers are far less likely to be re-abused. CASA intervention stops the cycle of abuse that’s often passed on from generation to generation. In court, lawyers know the law and have dozens of kids’ files. Social workers know the DFCS policies and have dozens of kid’s files. But a CASA volunteer has just one file, and what they know is that child in that file.

Last year in Fulton County more than 1050 abused and neglected children were removed from their homes. Atlanta CASA served 380 of those children. This means that we were only able to help less than 40% of the children in need of advocacy. Atlanta CASA volunteers are typically assigned to the most serious cases of abuse and maltreatment. Last year 235 Atlanta CASA volunteers contributed 56,400 advocacy hours on behalf of those 380 child victims. Their efforts saved the county $1,434,252.00.

Financials

Atlanta Court Appointed Special Advocates, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Atlanta Court Appointed Special Advocates, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 2/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Joseph Handy

NBMBAA

Term: 2020 -


Board co-chair

John Cahill

Md7 LLC

Term: 2015 -

Leesa Flora

Attorney

Omosede Oriakai

Metlife

Stephen Marion

Business Solutions Consulting

Pascal Lewis

Delta Global Services Security and Pilot Training Services

John Cahill

Md7, LLC

Justin Sullivan

PNC Wealth Management

Rachel Davidson

Office of the Child Advocate

Merlin Knight

Magic Waste Valet

Janice Johnson

UPS (Retired)

Gwendolyn Lusk

UPS (Retired)

Leyla Compani

Welcome America

Michelle Taylor-Willis

MTW Enterprises

Ann Burris

Dept of Human Svcs

Stephanie Robinson

Cohesive Solutions

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/11/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/26/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.