Crime, Legal Related

Atlanta Court Appointed Special Advocates, Inc.

I am for the child whose name no one can remember.

aka Fulton County CASA

Atlanta, GA

Mission

Atlanta CASA is committed to providing trained, supervised volunteers to advocate for abused and neglected children, one child at a time. We serve the Atlanta communities with the most children in need of advocates.

Ruling Year

1997

Executive Director

Ms. Robbyn Ingram

Main Address

Judge Romae Powell Juvenile Justice Center 395 Pryor St. Suite 4116

Atlanta, GA 30312 USA

Keywords

child advocate, children, abused, foster, foster care, court, neglected, volunteers, legal, youth, national, assistance, volunteer, volunteer child advocate, child advocacy

EIN

58-2330915

 Number

4019725419

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Child Abuse, Prevention of (I72)

Protection Against and Prevention of Neglect, Abuse, Exploitation (I70)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

There is a need to advocate for abused and neglected children in the Fulton County court system. The court system can be very difficult for families to navigate. The average child will spend more than two years in foster care and those children will change homes an average of three times. Thus, Fulton County CASA provides the support to ensure that the child and family do not get lost in the overburdened legal and social service system or languish in inappropriate group or foster homes. CASA services are based on a national, standards-based, replicable model that utilizes screened and trained community volunteers to provide individualized advocacy for children and families involved in juvenile court dependency proceedings as the result of abuse and neglect.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Atlanta CASA

Fostering Futures

Education Advocacy

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Total number of abused and neglected children served.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Related program

Atlanta CASA

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of new Volunteer Advocates trained

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Related program

Atlanta CASA

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of Volunteer Advocacy

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Children and youth (0-19 years)

Related program

Atlanta CASA

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context notes

Last year CASA volunteers contributed 55,680 advocacy hours on behalf of child victims. Their efforts saved the county $1,415,942.00.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

It is the goal of Fulton County CASA's to find a safe and permanent home for children who have been abused and neglected as expeditiously as possible. Our hope is to reunite the child with their biological family, therefore the focus is to identify any needs of the family, any gaps in services, and ensure that the family has an opportunity to have their children returned home. In the Fulton County CASA service area, during state fiscal year 2016, Fulton County CASA provided volunteer advocates for approximately 1/3 of the abused and neglected children age 18 and under referred to foster care. To achieve the goal of providing a volunteer advocate for every child, we have to triple our volunteer base. With our loyal supporters, community and partners, Fulton County CASA is committed to achieving this goal over the next 5 years.

Increase number of children served and permanency outcomes by ....
I. Increased fund raising and diversify funding streams
II. Increase organizational capacity and infrastructure
III. Increased volunteer recruitment and retention
IV.Increased staff recruitment and retention
V. Build Community, Court and DFACS relationships

Fulton County CASA is governed by a diverse, volunteer group of leaders who are committed to CASA's mission. The paid CASA staff are educated professionals; the Executive Director, two Managers, and a team of Advocacy Coordinators. The Advocacy Coordinators provide volunteer advocates with on-going professional support, consultation and supervision. The duties of the Coordinators include but are not limited to providing background and contact information on cases, recommending alternatives in complicated cases, reviewing written court reports, and documenting the activities and progress of the cases. The Program Manager supervises the Advocacy Coordinators, documents service deliveries for monthly and quarterly statistical reports and supports the Executive Director as needed. The Volunteer Engagement Manager recruits community members as potential volunteer advocates, oversees the 40-hour training workshops as well as facilitating the additional in-service training that is required of volunteers. Fulton County CASA is affiliated with both the National CASA Association and Georgia CASA.

Fulton County CASA will primarily focus on key performance indicators​ as the main measures of impact and of achieving overarching goals and strategy. This would include: 90% or more of children served by CASA leaving protective care for safe, permanent homes; increase in number or percentage of children served; increase in volunteers sworn in by the courts; increase in total number of active volunteers; volunteer retention greater than or equal to 75%; and Advocacy Coordinators on staff to proportionately support volunteers; increased funding to support program and organizational capacity building.

Foster children with CASA volunteers are 4 times as likely to graduate from high school. Children who have CASA volunteers are far less likely to be re-abused. CASA intervention stops the cycle of abuse that’s often passed on from generation to generation. In court, lawyers know the law and have dozens of kids’ files. Social workers know the DFCS policies and have dozens of kid’s files. But a CASA volunteer has just one file, and what they know is that one child. Last year In Fulton County 1050 abused and neglected children were removed from their homes. Fulton County CASA served 387 of those children. This means that we were only able to help less t than 40% of the children in need of advocacy. CASA volunteers are typically assigned to the most serious cases of abuse and maltreatment. Last year 211 CASA volunteers contributed 51,128 advocacy hours on behalf of those 387 child victims. Their efforts saved the county $1,226,880.00.

External Reviews

Financials

Atlanta Court Appointed Special Advocates, Inc.

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/26/2020

Leadership

No data

Race & Ethnicity

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

Disability

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 03/26/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data

done
We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.

Policies and processes

done
We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
done
We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.