The Atlanta Women's Foundation, Inc.

Breaking Barriers. Building Women.

aka AWF   |   Atlanta, GA   |  http://www.atlantawomen.org

Mission

The Atlanta Women’s Foundation’s mission is to be a catalyst for change in the lives of women and girls. AWF is a convener, educator, and funder. Since 1998, the Foundation has invested over $19 million in Atlanta area nonprofit organizations that have successfully moved women and girls from poverty to economic self-sufficiency. In addition to strategic grantmaking, AWF provides leadership and philanthropic training to a diverse group of professional women to empower not only themselves, but their communities as well. The Atlanta Women’s Foundation: Breaking Barriers. Building Women.

Notes from the nonprofit

The Atlanta Women's Foundation is conducting a new strategic plan with the process beginning in August 2021.

Ruling year info

1998

Chief Executive Officer

Kari B. Love

Main address

3355 Lenox Road Suite 850

Atlanta, GA 30326 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

58-2389721

NTEE code info

Public Foundations (T30)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Atlanta Women’s Foundation (AWF) strives to break barriers for women and girls in metro Atlanta so they can live economically self-sufficient, successful, safe, and healthy lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Grantmaking

The Atlanta Women’s Foundation’s goal is to support organizations that improve the lives of economically vulnerable women and girls in Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett counties.

The absence of economic self-sufficiency is at the heart of critical issues faced by women and girls in our community. Access to resources plays a major role in determining the choices women and girls make. The Atlanta Women’s Foundation supports organizations that lift women and girls up and out of poverty by increasing their access to services and opportunities for advancement. One of the ways we accomplish this is through strategic grantmaking. Our areas of focus are mental and physical health services, workforce development, education, and life skills.

In order to achieve the greatest impact with the funds AWF invests in the community, we have incorporated a Collective Impact Model into our grantmaking. This collective impact model involves a structured process that leads to a common agenda, shared measurement system, and continuous communication among the cohort of grantees that provide the services. The goal of the collective impact approach is to create large-scale community change.

In March of 2020, AWF created the COVID-19 Grantee Partner Relief Fund, an emergency fund for our grantee partners. As we continue to learn more on the immediate and extended needs that women and girls serving nonprofits in our community are facing, we will use these funds to support these nonprofits, help sustain impact, and address the greatest needs.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
Homeless people

We can sustain a greater impact by training women to tap into their abilities to be strong leaders, deep thinkers and strategic philanthropists. We do that through the key program Women on Board. This program was designed to increase the number of women on nonprofit boards in Metro Atlanta by providing effective board governance training to Atlanta women and connecting participants to nonprofit organizations. Since its inception in 2000, the program has trained more than 5,000 women in board governance and leadership skills.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Adults

Established in 2018, Inspire Atlanta is a comprehensive initiative that provides a unique experience to a diverse group of professional women leaders who are looking to ignite their passion for creating positive change for women in Atlanta.

Inspire Atlanta focuses on three main areas – philanthropic, personal, and professional development. Participants will meet many of the dynamic corporate and civic leaders associated with AWF, connect with other women professionals, and explore the critical issues facing women and girls locally. They also manage an individual fundraising campaign to support the mission of AWF.

As the only public foundation in Georgia dedicated solely to women and girls, it is our responsibility to prepare women to be thoughtful, well-informed, philanthropic leaders who understand the unique issues women and girls face locally. Through the Inspire Atlanta initiative, we are training women to develop or enhance the skills needed to empower and develop not only themselves, but their communities as well.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients receiving health care benefits as part of wage package

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Women's Pathway To Success Program metric, providing access to training, childcare, financial literacy, and employment opportunities for women in poverty. 10 organizations report.

Number of women living at or below poverty receiving access to workforce training and development, microenterprise development, childcare, financial literacy, or employment opportunities.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Women's Pathway To Success Program metric, providing access to training, childcare, financial literacy, and employment opportunities for women in poverty. 10 organizations report.

Number that had access to the Breaking Barriers, Building Women: Economic Empowerment Program combination of services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Economic Empowerment Program metric, providing access to higher education and asset building opportunities for women living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. 8 organizations report

Number of new businesses created.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Women's Pathway To Success Program metric, providing access to training, childcare, financial literacy, and employment opportunities for women in poverty. 10 organizations report.

Number of jobs created and maintained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Women's Pathway To Success Program metric, providing access to training, childcare, financial literacy, and employment opportunities for women in poverty. 10 organizations report.

Number of program participants who obtain a job within 3 months of program completion

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Women's Pathway to Success metric. We were not surprised to see a decrease in 2020 with the pandemic greatly affecting women.

Number that have been able to secure an average hourly wage of $10.50 after completing a program supported through this grant.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Women's Pathway to Success metric. We were not surprised to see a decrease in 2020 with the pandemic greatly affecting women.

Number that have completed financial literacy training

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric was measured through both the Women's Pathway to Success Program and the Breaking Barriers, Building Women: Economic Empowerment Program. Decrease believed to be due to the pandemic.

Number that have achieved economic stability

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Women's Pathway To Success Program metric, providing access to training, childcare, financial literacy, and employment opportunities for women in poverty. 10 organizations report.

Number that childcare scholarships/free childcare services have been provided to

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Infants and toddlers, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric was measured through both the Women's Pathway to Success Program and the Breaking Barriers, Building Women: Economic Empowerment Program. Decrease believed to be due to the pandemic.

Number that were able to secure housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Adults, Young adults

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This metric was measured through the Women's Pathway to Success and Breaking Barriers, Building Women: Economic Empowerment, decrease believed to be due to the pandemic.

Number that have recieved higher education and/or asset building opportunities.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Young women, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Economic Empowerment Program metric, providing access to higher education and asset building opportunities for women living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. 8 organizations report.

Number that have enrolled in an undergraduate or technical school program within 4 months of entering the program.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Young women, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Economic Empowerment Program metric, providing access to higher education and asset building opportunities for women living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. 8 organizations report

Number that have attained a degree or certification.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Young women, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Economic Empowerment Program metric, providing access to higher education and asset building opportunities for women living at or below 200% of the federal poverty level. 8 organizations report

Number that have obtained full-time employment in their career fields, earning incomes 250% above poverty level.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Young women, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Economic Empowerment Program metric, decrease believed to be due to the pandemic.

Number of women living at or below 200% of federal poverty guidelines will have access to mental and behavioral health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Women's and Girls' Mental Health & Wellbeing Project metric, providing access to mental and behavioral health care for women and girls. 10-14 organizations report. 2019 received 6mo grants.

Number of mental and behavioral health consultations provided.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Women's and Girls' Mental Health & Wellbeing Project metric, providing access to mental and behavioral health care for women and girls. 10-14 organizations report. 2019 received 6mo grants.

Number of women with mental health conditions and hypertension and/or diabetes that achieved blood pressure and/or hemoglobin A1c in the target range.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Grantmaking

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Women's and Girls' Mental Health & Wellbeing Project metric, providing access to mental and behavioral health care for women and girls. 10-14 organizations report. 2019 received 6mo grants.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Atlanta Women’s Foundation’s goal is to support organizations that improve the lives of economically vulnerable women and girls in Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, and Gwinnett counties.

Less than 2% of foundation funding in the United States goes to women and girls. Social problems affect women and girls in unique ways—biologically, psychologically, and economically—so programs designed to deal with these problems must acknowledge, honor, and reflect these factors. AWF examines everything it does through a gender lens. We are always asking, “Was this program designed with women and girls in mind?” AWF sees what works (and what doesn’t) and then identifies and funds the organizations and programs with the greatest impact.

When you invest AWF, you invest in stronger, more stable families and communities. Invest in women and girls, and you invest a society that works—for everyone.

The absence of economic self-sufficiency is at the heart of critical issues faced by women and girls in our community. Access to resources plays a major role in determining the choices women and girls make. AWF supports organizations that lift women and girls up and out of poverty by increasing their access to services and opportunities for advancement.

AWF primarily accomplishes this through our strategic grantmaking, with grant recipients having to meet specific criteria, be reviewed by the Board Grant Committee, and approved by the Board of Directors. As a funder and a convener, AWF plays an essential role in creating the space for collaboration and in supporting our grantee partners as they work together to achieve better results. In order to achieve the greatest impact with the funds AWF invests in the community, we have incorporated a Collective Impact Model into our grantmaking. This collective impact model involves a structured process that leads to a common agenda, shared measurement system, and continuous communication among the cohort of grantees that provide the services. The goal of the collective impact approach is to create large-scale community change.

We are also an educator, conducting research and developing community advocates in support of women and girls. Created in 2000, the program was designed to increase the number of women on nonprofit boards in metro Atlanta by providing effective board governance training to Atlanta women and connecting participants to nonprofit organizations. Created in 2018, Inspire Atlanta is a comprehensive initiative that provides a unique experience to a diverse group of professional women leaders who are looking to ignite their passion for creating positive change for women in Atlanta. Inspire Atlanta focuses on three main areas – philanthropic, personal, and professional development.

AWF is staffed by a diverse, experienced, talented, and tenured staff made up of 6 full time, 1 part-time, and 2 contractors committed to the mission.

Our Board of Directors is made up of 20 diverse, philanthropic community and corporate leaders, 90% of whom are women. The Board of Directors are dedicated to supporting AWF staff in fundraising, grant, and leadership initiatives. Board of Director alumni continue to be engaged with the organization through events and gift support. Inspire Atlanta program alumnae also continue to support AWF after their graduation.

There is broad renewed community support from individuals, corporations, and foundations year over year.

Our grantee partners and history of funding over 350 organizations in metro Atlanta allows AWF to partner with nonprofits making the greatest impact. Supporting our grantee partners means financial support to AWF is amplified at least 10 times, and usually more.

For grantmaking, AWF has invested $19 million in over 350 organizations that have successfully moved women and girls from poverty to economic self-sufficiency. Current grant projects include The Women's Pathway To Success Program (Year 4 funds will be distributed in June 2021), The Building Women, Breaking Barriers: Economic Empowerment Program (Year 3 funds were distributed in January 2021) and The Rebuilding Women's Initiative to support mental health and survivors of domestic violence affected by the pandemic. Funds are currently being raised.

Some recent highlights for women and girls living at or below 200% of federal poverty guidelines include: Over 14,000 women have access to workforce development and childcare scholarships, and over 3,700 women had access to higher education and asset building. From 2017-2021, 224 new businesses and 389 new jobs were created.

In April of 2020, AWF created a COVID-19 relief fund for our grantees. Organizations received funding to help provide access to critical services such as mental and physical healthcare, food and shelter, rental and utility assistance, along with mortgage relief. Over 3,000 women had access to these services. Through our evaluation process we learned how much progress had been made as well as how much more assistance was needed. AWF is currently raising funds to distribute additional dollars in the summer of 2021 to organizations providing mental health care and assistance for domestic abuse survivors affected by the pandemic.

For leadership programs, over 5,000 women have been trained in board leadership through Women on Board. 144 women have received personal, professional, and philanthropic development through Inspire Atlanta, with over 95% of participants reporting an increase in fundraising knowledge and an understanding of the issues facing women and girls in our community.

We will continue to invest in our grantmaking and leadership programs driven by research and the needs of women and girls in metro Atlanta.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The mission of The Atlanta Women's Foundation is to be a catalyst for change in the lives of women and girls. AWF's mission is accomplished through strategic grantmaking and leadership trainings. In strategic grantmaking, our clients are the 501c3 nonprofits who serve women and girls living at or below 200% of federal poverty guidelines through access to services. In leadership training, professional women who are interested in serving on a board, fundraising, and becoming a community leader.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Convenings,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To increase support of current grantees in achieving impact goals, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    AWF was considering a certain corporate partnership for all of our grantees and upon surveying, realized the partnership would not fill their needs appropriately.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our leadership trainings have evolved because of feedback received from those we serve. Their responses have created the programs we have today, and continuous feedback continues to inform decisions made every year.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

The Atlanta Women's Foundation, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Atlanta Women's Foundation, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 6/11/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Meredith Leapley

Leapley Construction

Term: 2021 - 2023

Kristin Adams

Aon Risk Solutions

Cari Dawson

Alston & Bird, LLC

Nancy Halwig

BBVA

Jennifer Welch Hightower

Cox Communications

Rebecca Schmitt

LexisNexis Risk Solutions

Michele Sims

Morgan Stanley Wealth Management

Mark Wasserman

Sutherland

Colleen McBride, Ph.D.

Emory University

Lativia Ray-Alston

PwC

Sujatha Reddy, M.D.

Premier Care for Women

Anne Sheehan, CRE, MAI, CEO

Real Property Tax Advisors

Bentina Terry

Georgia Power

Kali Beyah

Delta Air Lines

Tina Shah

Turner Sports

Carolyn Alford

King & Spalding

Kimberly Kitchens

Intercontinental Hotels Group

Meredith Leapley

Leapley Construction

Joanna Price

The Coca-Cola Company

Ellen Smith

Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP

Blaise Warren

Invesco, Ltd.

Krystal Zell

The Home Depot

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/09/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.