National Association of Chiefs of Police, Inc.

aka NACOP   |   Titusville, FL   |  www.nacoponline.org

Mission

NACOP was founded in 1967 to provide a unified voice for command law enforcement officers throughout the United States. We support professional law enforcement through publications, tactical education & emergency assistance. We assist paralyzed/disabled police officers and their families through holiday/birthday gift-giving to the children of disabled officers, as well as college scholarships, summer camp funds and medical cost support. Our K-9 placement program has raised and distributed over $1 million for canine units with 104 agencies in 31 states. NACOP also manages the American Police Hall of Fame in Titusville, FL, with a beautiful memorial rotunda and interactive exhibits.We also conduct a wide variety of classes designed to save officer lives and improve LE community impact.

Ruling year info

1971

CEO

Mr. Barry Shepherd

Main address

6350 Horizon Dr

Titusville, FL 32780 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-1164090

NTEE code info

Leadership Development (W70)

History Museums (A54)

Family Services (P40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

NACOP seeks to address the concerns of law enforcement leadership nationwide while looking out for those officers (and families) who have been seriously injured/disabled in the line of duty.
At the time our organization was founded, there were few agencies providing such assistance to disabled/paralyzed officers. While the support network is stronger today, it is still nowhere near where it should be. Thus, our organization supports families in a variety of ways (educational funding, medical reimbursement, emergency funds, holiday gifts, etc), while making sure that injured officers know they have not been forgotten and that they always have a place to turn.
We also seek to educate the public through our museum, creating a greater understanding/empathy between civilians and law enforcement, something desperately needed in these tense times.
Additionally, as K9 units have become more important to law enforcement, many agencies cannot afford the $2-10,000 expense. NACOP can help.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Public Education

The National Association of Chiefs of Police educational programs include the quarterly magazine "The Chief of Police" , a variety of public safety mailers and information, on-site training and education for law enforcement and civilians alike, STEM and related educational initiatives at the Museum itself, and much more.

Population(s) Served

There is a growing trend for law enforcement agencies to use dogs in crime and drug prevention education programs in schools. In our research, we discovered that more than 25% of small to medium sized departments (less than 200 officers) were either underfunded or had no funding at all in their K-9 division.

There is an opportunity for individuals and corporations to help meet this need. The National Association of Chiefs of Police is seeking funding to supply police departments with much needed K-9s.

As funding is available, the National Association of Chiefs of Police provides dogs to police departments across the country. Additionally we assist with training, equipment and supply costs for these dogs. The cost of a police K-9 can range from $4,500 to $10,000, depending on the training requirements of both the dog and the handler and any equipment that may need to be purchased to accommodate the dog.

Population(s) Served

The purpose of the Family Fund for Paralyzed and Disabled Officers is:
RECOGNITION
We provide recognition to these officers by awarding them the Police Purple Heart Medal and Certificate acknowledging the sacrifice they made in the line of duty. Continued recognition is achieved through support and assistance.
ASSISTANCE
Helping officers help themselves: The officers are assisted in regaining productive lives through either college or vocational scholarships or with financial assistance for medical expenses incurred by their injuries.
SUPPORT
Children of these officers are supported with programs such as college scholarships, summer camp grants as well as Christmas & birthday gifts. Parents and spouses feel support through the Mother's and Father's Day program.

Population(s) Served

The American Police Hall of Fame & Museum, founded in 1960 by a law enforcement officer who was injured in the line of duty, is the nation's first national police museum and memorial dedicated to honoring American law enforcement officers and those killed in the line of duty.
Museum Exhibits
The Museum, through interactive displays, simulators and nearly 11,000 artifacts, educates the public about the history and current trends of American law enforcement. Featured at the Museum is a state-of-the-art 24 lane indoor gun range and is open to the public six days a week, and at which extensive law enforcement training is conducted. Law enforcement officers shoot free at the range, which is an expense covered by NACOP and the Museum facility.
Inside the Museum facility, our beautiful Memorial Hall lists over 9,000 officers who were killed in the line of duty. Their names are permanently etched on the Memorial's marble walls, which are added to once a year for Police Memorial Day. On Police Memorial Day (May 15th) the Memorial hosts thousands of police officers, family survivors and dignitaries from across the country. The event is a somber reminder that every 57 hours, a police officer is killed in the line of duty somewhere in America.

Population(s) Served

In 1987, the National Association of Chiefs of Police conducted a survey of national police commanders. The results of this survey were instrumental in making the needs of the local departments known on a national level. In the course of this research we discovered that many departments do not have adequate funding for many basic crime fighting tools. Each year since then, NACOP has continued to survey the concerns of police agencies of all sizes across the nation and to make those needs known.

Population(s) Served

The Law Enforcement Education Program (LEEP) offers world class tactical/strategic training with the nation’s premiere instructors at little or no cost to LEOs or their agencies -- and LEOs will also receive mandatory retraining credit, thanks to our partnership with Eastern Florida State College (EFSC) and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE).

For 30 years, NACOP has annually surveyed command LE staff about challenges they face. The need for more, better training has been a consistent theme. Even as agencies acknowledge the importance of tactical education, the number of agencies that actually make it available, let alone a priority, remains between 50-60%, leaving 40-50% of officers with little or no mandated or supported annual training in defensive techniques, force-on-force, defensive driving and more.

Beyond simply reporting these realities, NACOP’s Board of Directors has charged the organization with taking action to change those numbers and, in so doing, protect both law enforcement and civilian lives.

Our in-house trainers have completed rigorous FDLE training through Eastern Florida State College and have previously taught at a variety of law enforcement academies and military institutions. Outside trainers include authorities like Dave "Boon" Benton of 13 Hours/Benghazi fame, CQB expert Fred Mastison, Retired FBI Agent Ed Mireles, "American Warrior" Gary O'Neal, body language expert Pamela Barnum and a host of other highly skilled national authorities.

Population(s) Served

Our civilian Safety Training Education Program (STEP) program grew out of a desire to capitalize on our world-class trainers and facility in order to give civilians the best possible personal defense education.

STEP classes are divided into four levels (from beginner to advanced), with each class offering credits that students accrue by filling out a Student Registration Card every class. The classes cover all aspects of personal defense, personal defense laws, and personal defense equipment. Because of the proliferation of firearms in the state of Florida, we focus heavily on gun safety, but our classes are not limited to that topic. We also focus on hand-to-hand defense, interacting with law enforcement, emergency medical treatment, everyday crime prevention activities and techniques and much more.

Additionally, we seek to educate the public on the realities on personal protection, that firearms are not toys and that using them to defend yourself is a much more complex process than simply standing at a shooting range firing at paper targets. As a result, our classes offer shoot/no-shoot scenarios, moving and shooting, shooting from cover and concealment, and understanding the limitations of the law, your own skill, and that of your equipment.

​Some classes are offered year-round while others are periodic, much like a college curriculum.
Our trainers are world-class law enforcement, military, NRA, and USCCA trainers who offer training in our venue for less than you would typically pay elsewhere.

NACOP is committed to not only making our law enforcement officers safer and more prepared, but doing the same for the civilians they serve. Together, we can make the streets safer for EVERYONE.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of periodical subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Public Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Chief of Police Magazine addresses industry topics and challenges for law enforcement leadership across the country.

Total number of guided tours given

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Public Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

If you have a group that will be in Brevard County, contact us about a tour. We also welcome school groups, police academy attendees, senior tourists and more. Call us at 321-264-0911 to set up a tour

Funds spent on securing canine (K9) units for law enforcement agencies.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

K-9 Placement Program

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our K-9 placement program has spent almost $1 million on providing trained K-9 units to agencies in need.

Number of police agencies we work with each year.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Public Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

The number varies from year-to-year and includes agencies we provide services to (K-9s, benefits to officers etc) and agencies we work with or consult on LE topics.

Number of college scholarships awarded to the children of disabled officers.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family Fund for Paralyzed and Disabled Officers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of disabled officers and family members served.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Family Fund for Paralyzed and Disabled Officers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Safety and Crime Prevention educational materials distributed.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Public Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Obviously, through our museum, our classes, and our mailing program, one of our primary goals is to foster safe communities and informed/aware citizens.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our goal is to provide a communications network between law enforcement leaders nationwide -- a means by which Chiefs of Police, Sheriffs and other leadership can communicate common concerns and work together to address and resolve them.
Our goal is to make sure that no officer injured in the line of duty ever has to wonder how he/she will support his/her family. We seek to grow our ability to provide medical and emergency support and to further expand our programs that provide college scholarships, summer camp funding, and birthday and holiday gifts for the children of disabled/paralyzed officers.
Our goal is to also expand our K-9 program so that more small departments can benefit.
Our goal is to upgrade and expand our Museum and Memorial facilities so that we offer an even greater level of public education (STEM classes based on forensic science and 21st Century criminal investigation techniques) in addition to newer, more engaging interactive displays and exhibits.
We are also always looking for better ways to honor to our fallen officers and their families. Each year, families of fallen officers travel from across the country to take part in our Police Week observances. During that week, we offer programming, unique cultural activities and a special memorial service to honor their loved ones.
We are also exploring new, digital venues where we can publically honor those who have paid the ultimate price as well as those who go above and beyond the call of duty each and every day.
And, finally, we believe it is critically important for us to play a role in educating the general public on the challenges of being a law enforcement officer (LEO). We are seeking to expand educational interactions between civilians and LEOs; we seek to share the LEO experience with a greater audience through on-site programming, digital venues, through museum displays and through our substantial direct mail database.

We are currently upgrading all of our digital assets in order to make it easier for people to engage with us, donate to us, and make us aware of officers and families in need.
We are overhauling our website, our social media practices and policies, and engaging with subject matter experts in education and museum exhibitry.
Additionally, we are bringing on board new staff members with expertise in law enforcement interaction, capacity building, development and communications.
We are actively expanding our local and regional interactions so that constituents and potential donors and agencies understand what we are doing and how we are serving law enforcement at the local, regional and national level.
We have also begun reaching out to other non-profit and civic agencies and organizations to partner on projects and programs.
Likewise, as we upgrade our digital approach, we are evaluating our public interaction and fundraising methodologies -- which have traditionally been conducted primarily via direct mail. While direct mail remains an important part of our operational approach (we send out tens of thousands of cards, gifts, awards, public safety pieces and more – many to a constituency with a preference for printed matter over digital), we also recognize that it is a costly endeavor, so we are constantly looking at ways to harness new technology in order to better communicate with our constituents and to solicit donations from those who care about law enforcement issues and are committed to seeing our programs broaden and expand.
We have long utilized the services and expertise of the top direct mail and marketing organizations in the country. We will continue to depend on our subject matter experts even as we seek new guidance on emerging technologies and how they can best allow us to serve our men and women in blue at the highest level for the least expense. We owe this to our committed donors and, most of all, to the men and women of American law enforcement.

As noted above, we are reaching out to subject matter experts in digital technology, education, museum exhibitry, fundraising, communications and more in order to streamline how we approach the common issues in our industry.
Because we are both a human/family services agency and an educational facility, we must cast a wider net and convene more resources in order to come up with best practices and new approaches.
But we are dedicated to taking all actions necessary in order to increase the level of service we can offer to agencies and officers, and our ability to grow and change as new challenges and needs arise.
By national non-profit standards, we are a "small to mid-sized" agency -- we have fewer than 30 full-time employees and we manage a service area that consists of all 50 states, in addition to running a full-time museum and memorial, as well as a training range that specializes in law enforcement proficiency and public classes and education. By anyone's standards, we do a lot with a little.
We are working to build on that, utilizing our 50,000 sq ft facility in the most efficient manner and seeking out industry experts to help us identify gaps in programming or processes.
We also depend heavily on feedback from the industry we serve -- law enforcement. Of course many of our board members are current or former law enforcement, but we also depend on those individuals who are currently "in the trenches" to offer their recommendations and input. Plans for future growth include the creation of a law enforcement advisory board as well as a teacher advisory board (for our museum education program). The more we can engage with those we serve, the more our programs and approaches will improve.
We are fiscally solvent and perform outside annual audits to make sure we stay so. We pay our employees well but not lavishly, putting us at or below national standards for non-profit operational costs. Our leadership has no desire to make the mistakes made by some noteworthy national nonprofits who focused too much on internal abundance and amenities, while sacrificing constituent services in the process.
Our goals are to grow our constituent services, maintain a solid financial base so that we will be around for many more years to come, attract the best, most committed people to help us build our capacity, and consistently work to place ourselves in a position where we can take advantage of new opportunities to serve and expand our programming. It is a balancing act, to be sure, but one we have been perfecting throughout 50 years of service to our men and women in uniform.

Our 50,000 sq ft facility was built in 2003 (after moving from Miami, FL) and has become a destination for tourists and locals alike. We feature over 11,000 artifacts, exhibits and simulators that educate the public about the history, heroism and current trends in American law enforcement.
Likewise, we offer an on-site training facility for local and regional law enforcement that is open seven days a week and is among the most well-used ranges in the region.
We have been growing the museum facility annually and are poised to begin a new period of growth that will include a "21st Century Crime Lab" that focuses on forensic science and technology for student tour groups, as well as hands-on forensic displays for museum visitors.
We have also drawn up plans for a museum STEM Theater that will feature educational science and technology videos for grades 4-12 as well as space for public presentations. We are developing proposals for digital kiosks, new interpretive signage, Virtual Reality devices and informational and educational materials that will enhance the visitor and student experience.
We are simultaneously building the capacity of our human services programs, as we work to gain funding commitments that will significantly increase our emergency funding to the families of disabled officers as well as expanding our K-9 program and the size of scholarships we offer to law enforcement youngsters. We have other expansion plans in the works, but our most immediate goals involve better serving those in need. We are seeking to make more police agencies aware of what we offer, so that they can send disabled or paralyzed officers to us, rather than us having to track down those who need our services.
In short, we have strategic long-term plans laid out, as well as a broad range of short-term goals – all being carefully managed and implemented by a cadre of industry experts and individuals with a passion for supporting our nation's “thin, blue line."

Financials

National Association of Chiefs of Police, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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National Association of Chiefs of Police, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/1/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Jack Rinchich

Retired law enforcement


Board co-chair

Brian Smith

Barry Shepherd

Debra Chitwood

Jamie Maynard

John Kucan

Outreach Chairman

Brian Smith

Wayne Ivey

Brevard County Sheriff

Steve Wayne

FWC

Steve Newton

James Khoury

Henry Hambel

Steven Labov

Sarah Long