Metropolitan Ministries, Inc.

Hope is Here

Tampa, FL   |  www.metromin.org

Mission

We care for the homeless and those at risk of becoming homeless in our community through services that alleviate suffering, promote dignity and instill self-sufficiency… as an expression of the ongoing ministry of Jesus Christ.

Ruling year info

1975

President and CEO

Mr. Tim Marks

Main address

2002 N Florida Ave

Tampa, FL 33602-2204 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-1477007

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Through services that alleviate suffering, promote dignity, and instill self-sufficiency, Metropolitan Ministries reaches the community of at-risk and homeless amilies and individuals who are most in need of food, shelter, and other basic needs in the greater Tampa Bay area. The Ministries offers services through its Family Support Centers and Mobile BrigAIDe outreach teams that include: food, clothing, housing assistance, transportation assistance, education, career guidance, and job training, as well as emergency housing and long-term residential housing programs for families and children.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Outreach and Prevention Services

Metropolitan Ministries provides comprehensive services and solutions for poor and homeless families through its family support centers, mobile outreach, and transitional housing programs that help families reach and maintain their best level of self-sufficiency.

The Ministries reaches out to hungry people by providing prepared meals to partner organizations, located throughout the Tampa Bay area, where anyone who is hungry can be fed.

For families and individuals who live in their own home, but are at risk of becoming homeless, the Ministries provides emergency food boxes, clothing, holiday assistance, and referrals to other agencies to meet their additional needs. These services are offered in a manner that emphasizes dignity.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Economically disadvantaged people

The Uplift U Self-Sufficiency program is for families who need help recovering from traumatic life events. Long-term services like on-site child care and classes in spiritual development provide a safe, loving environment where long-term healing can occur. Now, 100 families and 250 children have a home base as they work toward self-sufficiency.

The program offers the following:
• Safe shelter and three nutritious meals a day
• Trauma counseling and case management
• Health and wellness programs
• Early childhood education and onsite K-5 partnership school (in partnership with Hillsborough Public Schools)
• Youth enrichment programs
• Spiritual formation
• Adult education and life skills classes
• Job training
• Employment and housing assistance

Population(s) Served
Families
Women and girls

Providing short-term housing for families and single women. The Ministries offers life-skills training and employment services that help families get back on their feet — and become self-sufficient.

Our short and long term self-sufficiency programs include:

• Safe shelter and three nutritious meals a day
• Trauma counseling and case management
• Health and wellness programs
• Early childhood education and onsite K-5 partnership school (in partnership with Hillsborough Public Schools)
• Youth enrichment programs
• Spiritual formation
• Adult education and life skills classes
• Job training
• Employment and housing assistance

Population(s) Served
Families
Women and girls

In 2015, Metropolitan Ministries expanded its services in Pasco County with 12 transitional housing units for homeless families with children on our Holiday Campus. Today Miracles for Pasco has a total of 24 units and is a replicate model of the Uplift U® program in Tampa. Average length of stay is four to six months. Stays can be longer with educational goals supporting an extension.

Services offered include:
• 4 hour resident services staff
• Three hot meals daily
• Case Management
• GED and Adult Education
• Counseling
• Financial Wellness
• Housing Assistance
• Employment Training
• After School Programing
• Program Partners:
o Connections Job Development
o Healing Hands Health Center
o Mid Florida Community Services

Population(s) Served
Families
Women and girls

Where we work

Awards

Gold Certification 2015

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Certification from the U.S. Green Building Council

Certification 2016

Sanctuary Model of Trauma Informed Care

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people, Homeless people, Victims and oppressed people

Related Program

Outreach and Prevention Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

43% increase due to emergency COVID-19 relief efforts

Number of families helped through housing and case management services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships

Related Program

Uplift U® Self-Sufficiency Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

At-risk and homeless families benefited from our housing and residential programs with 86.4% successful exits.

Number of households that obtain/retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships

Related Program

Uplift U® Self-Sufficiency Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020, we experienced a shortage/restriction of volunteers due to the COVID-19 pandemic. These 13,892 volunteers donated 111,440 volunteer hours saving the Ministries $2.78 million.

Number of low-income households who have received utilities assistance to keep the lights, heat and/or water on in their homes

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Outreach and Prevention Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Families who need help with common utility bills can come to the Family Support Centers at Metropolitan Ministries locations for assistance. This an increase of 1,391% during the pandemic.

Number of and dollar amount of goods and services given in-kind

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Emergency Family Shelter

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Decrease is due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Number of families assisted with rent or mortgage to avoid eviction

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Outreach and Prevention Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

$2.33 million paid directly to landlords in COVID-19 relief.

Number of households that retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Family relationships, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Uplift U® Self-Sufficiency Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Of the more than 900 families completing our residential programs successfully, 93.1% of families maintained stable housing.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Metropolitan Ministries will be America's most effective caregiver to poor and homeless people.

Our programs will be known for their compassion and innovation in helping struggling families and individuals achieve their highest potential for self-sufficiency.

Our approach to involving citizens in understanding and caring for their disadvantaged neighbors will serve as a replicable model.

Our caregiving will be supported by an exemplary staff, high-quality facilities, dedicated volunteers, donors and collaborative partners.

Above all, our witness will be to the power of love in healing broken lives and building strong, caring communities.

Family Support Center: the focus of this program is reaching out to hungry people and preventing homelessness.

On-Campus Residential Services: consists of 124 units that house 116 families and 18 single women including 300 children. On any given day, approximately 450 persons have a safe place to live while working toward self-sufficiency. The residential stay, depending on the individual or families' needs and the program the family is enrolled in, could last from a few weeks up to 12 months. The components of the Residential Programs include- Counseling, Food and Nutrition, Children's Programs, Employment, Health, Culinary Arts, Housing Placement, and Recovery and Sobriety Services.

First Hug Mobile Case Management Services: a home visitation case management program specifically designed for families struggling with homelessness with children 0 to 8 years old. First Hug uses trauma-informed evidence-based techniques to provide key services that help homeless families in crisis stabilize, decrease stress, and assure children are safe, ready to learn and succeed. 556 children benefited from the First Hug program in the last year (this is in addition to our on-campus programs).

PromiseLand Early Childhood Education Center: provides loving, comprehensive care for children zero through five years old. Specialized programs include: Infant Mental Health, Special Needs, Parent-Child Interactive Therapy.

Metropolitan Ministries K-5 Partnership School: The Patricia J. Sullivan Partnership School serves as a choice elementary school. In close partnership with the School District of Hillsborough County, parents and our dedicated staff, we help students achieve academic success and social and emotional growth.

Parent-Child Home Program: a national early learning program for children aged two to three years old, this program aids under-resourced parents or guardians of children by providing home visitors for help with developing their child's reading and early learning skills—offering encouragement for parents and to prepare children for school readiness and life success.

Spiritual Formation: spiritual assessments and counseling, connection to local congregations, Bible study, worship services.

Youth Enrichment Center: serves middle and high school teens and supports our critical after-school programs and summer camps. Programs are specifically designed to address trauma, educational gaps, leadership development and enrichment for at-risk youth. Specialty programs include SpeakUp, a public speaking and leadership program, Dale Carnegie leadership training, performing arts training with the Patel Conservatory, A Robotics Program offered through STEAM, sports and exercise, relationship support and emotional safety, real-world experiences.

Health and Wellness: mental health counseling, addiction recovery counseling, exercise and nutrition programs, family, couple and child counseling, health screenings, mobile health clinic.

• Maintain 4-Star Charity Navigator Rating - their highest rating
• We are almost certain we are the only nonprofit in the area with a dedicated
Process Improvement and Outcomes Department who track and report regularly on key performance indicators of the client, volunteer, staff, and donor data, as well as all program compliance.
• Community Engagement: 52,000 active donors, 80 service partners, and 25,923 volunteers.

Success through accountability:
• Program accreditations
• Volunteer board of directors
• Adherence to generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP)
• Annual audit by a qualified independent CPA firm
• Ethical standards and principles are the foundation for maintaining public trust, and Metropolitan Ministries' fundraisers are members of the Association of Fundraising Professionals and uphold the Code of Ethical Principles and Standards.

In the 49 years of Metropolitan Ministries' existence, we have been able to provide the following to poor and homeless families in the Tampa Bay region:

• 36,211,764 meals have been served
• 985,144 shelter nights have been provided to families
• 351,001 families have received holiday assistance, including gifts for children-in-need
• 1,521,651 children's lives have been impacted by our services
• 1,913,892 Volunteers have given their time and talents to ensure our mission is carried out each day

In 2020:
• Opened a new Affordable Housing complex with 112 units for families transitioning out of homelessness
• 244,000+ individuals assisted with COVID-19 emergency relief (food, rental assistance, utility assistance, emergency shelter).
• $2.33 million paid directly to landlords/utility vendors
• 40,331 families in need helped with food and toys for Thanksgiving and Christmas
• 2,736,539 meals served
• 135,380 nights of safe shelter provided
• 36,502 at-risk and homeless children received toys for Christmas
• 72,106 families helped in our Family Support Centers
• 20,409 emergency motel vouchers provided to families/children
• 3,951 services provided to chronically homeless individuals
• 926 families were case managed and benefited from our residential and community-based family programs

2021-2022 Initiatives:

Excellence in Ministry
• Increased resources for Family Support Centers in 3 counties
• Increased Mobile Case Management and Outreach Services through our Inspire Hope Initiative
• Increased Virtual Outreach (website, social media, bots, online classes/resources)
• Career education and job training through our Social Enterprises, Culinary Arts Program, and Thrift Store
• Opening a new Resiliency and Counseling Center
• Strengthening community collaborative partnerships
• Mentoring and grant funding for smaller nonprofits in the region
• Launched compassion fatigue training institute called Effinity

Professional Development
• Enhanced Key Performance Indicators (KPI) Measurements and Outcomes
• Succession Planning for CEO, executives, and staff
• What does it mean to be a leader at MM? (leadership training, culture, ambassadorship)

Organizational Sustainability
• Increase Pasco, Pinellas, Hernando, Manatee, and Polk County Community and Donor Engagement
• Redevelopment/expansion of our Pasco County campus
• Grow Corporate Engagement and Partners
• New Donor Acquisition
• Donor Stewardship and Retention
• Innovation and revenue generation through Social Enterprise initiatives
• Continue to form Collaborative Partnerships and garner in-kind support

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve homeless families, children, and individuals as well as those living in poverty and at-risk of becoming homeless.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    One major change is that we now offer mobilized services in addition to our on-campus services. People who are living in poverty often don't have reliable transportation or the ability to afford public transportation, which is already limited in the Tampa Bay area. They simply can't get to us for help. In other words, we go out to the need and meet people where they live through collaborative partnerships. As far as the chronically street homeless population, we launched a mobile street team called the Metro BrigAIDe. They offer services in the field to reach this demographic and get them the resources they need.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    One of our trauma-informed values is "Democracy". Everyone in our care has a voice and a vote on how they receive services. We openly communicate with our clients, listen, discuss, and make decisions on their feedback. Our clients appreciate being heard, they value the feeling of empowerment, and above all, trust is built.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Metropolitan Ministries, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Metropolitan Ministries, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Andy May

Cushman Wakefield

Term: 2020 - 2022

Rick Alvarez

Older Lundy & Alvarez

Carlos Baldor, Jr.

BST Global, Inc.

Tracy Bales

LAMPLighter

David Beshears

Beshears & Associates

Chas Bruck

SoHo Capital

Karen Buesing

Ackerman Law

Rev. Evan Burrows

First Baptist Church of College Hill

Anne Carney

Andrea Cheney

Strategic Marketing Planning

Chris Christenberry

Atlantic Health Solutions

Sheriff Chad Chronister

Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office

Gerry Coughlin

Oak Point Advisors

Preston Farrior

Ferman Automotive Management

Frank Ferreri

Ferreri Search

Scott Fink

Hyundai NPR

Tricia Hancock

Josh Helms

Physicians Partners of America

Rose Hester

Kurt Hull

Southern Crafted Homes

Andy May

Cushman & Wakefield of FL, Inc.

Jeff Marple

Southeast Independent Delivery Services

Bryce Kenny

Morgan Stanley Private Wealth Management

Andrew Pittman

ASAP Capital Partners, LLC

Jerome Ryans

Tampa Housing Authority

Martin Silbiger, M.D.

University Diagnostic Institute

Bruce Tigert

Bayshore Title

Gary Tillett

Bryan Van Vranken

Allstate Insurance Company

Will Weatherford

Weatherford Capital

David Redmond

Jerome Ryans

Martin Silbiger, M.D.

Bruce Tigert

Will Weatherford

Will Weatherford

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/27/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/06/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.