Big Brothers Big Sisters of Broward, Inc.

Defending Potential

aka BBBS Broward   |   Fort Lauderdale, FL   |  www.bbbsbroward.org

Mission

The mission of Big Brothers Big Sisters is to create and support one-to-one mentoring relationships that ignite the power and promise of youth.

Ruling year info

1974

President & Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Magdalena Mendez

Main address

4101 Ravenswood Road 202

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33312 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-1507595

NTEE code info

Big Brothers, Big Sisters (O31)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

To provide a caring, safe compassionate adult mentor to as many at-risk youths as possible to improve their development towards their highest potential. The need for volunteer mentors exceeds the amount of volunteers signing up to mentor. We need more male volunteers of color to mentor our youth waiting.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Based Mentoring Programs

A focus on communities facing adversity
Big Brothers Big Sisters operates several special programs to help us meet the needs of communities facing adversity. These programs help us focus our work with donors and partners in recruiting new Bigs, meet the needs of traditionally underserved communities and assist communities impacted by circumstances like foster care, parental incarceration or military deployment.
What do we do?
Our unique brand of One-to-One mentoring, in which a child facing adversity is carefully matched with a caring adult mentor in a relationship supported by professional Big Brothers Big Sisters staff members, changes lives for the better forever.

How it all comes together

Big Brothers Big Sisters operates in almost all 47 cities and communities across Broward County - large and small, urban and rural. Our agency uses the proven One- to- One mentoring model design and develops programs that are tailored to the needs of each child in their community.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

BISS is a cooperative school/site mentoring model focused on a personal growth plan rooted in the synchronization of academics, recreation and positive development of the "whole" student. It is full-circle collaboration between the BBBS professional, volunteer mentor, child and the resources of the schools' administration (teachers and counselors). Customized mentoring services are provided for at-risk youth who have been identified as low performing by school officials in elementary and middle schools.
GOALS:
Demonstrate improved social interactions/self confidence level and demonstrate improvement in socially accepted behavior. (CONFIDENCE); improved sense of caring as demonstrated by an increase in Trust; respect and relationship with family and peers. (CARING); improved Knowledge/Academics (mastery of information, skills and ability); Attitude/Behavior (sense of socialization, cooperation, partnership) ; report improvement in school readiness including Academic performance, attitude in school, school participation, and use of school resources and sense of future. (COMPETENCE)

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Students

Mentoring program for children in foster care, Youth transitioning out of care and into independent living.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
At-risk youth

One-to-One mentoring program for youth with one of both parents/guardians incarcerated. All aspects of positive youth development are addessed including re-unification

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Incarcerated people

Mentoring programs specifically focused on the LGBTQ+ community

Population(s) Served
LGBTQ people
Children and youth

Connecting Law Enforcement staff to mentor youth bringing together positive awarness

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
At-risk youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America 2018

Awards

Gold Standard Award 2017

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America

Affiliations & memberships

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who have a positive adult role model

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adolescents, Children, Ethnic and racial groups, LGBTQ people, Social and economic status

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020, we provided one to one mentoring relationships to 867 children living in Broward county.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

#1 - Impact at Scale – Success defined around the outcomes we achieve for children (impact), the increased number of children we impact (scale) and the lifelong success and community benefits that follow.
#2 - Sustainable Resources – Culture and systems to engage and steward every participant and community partnerships that increase mentors, driving investment in our outcomes and ability to server more children.
#3- Leadership, Partnership – Outcomes-oriented partnerships addressing the educational and juvenile delinquency issues at the community and national levels. 'government'
#4- Intentionality – Engage with communities we serve to capture strategic and cultural benefits as they become central parts of our culture.
#5- Marketing – Create and implement a dynamic plan

A. Develop a benchmark system that can be measured by our Matchforce performance management system that drives quality and strong outcomes for the youth we serve. Plan towards excellence.
B. Develop a balanced score card and plan for growth in each core program area.
C. Develop a comprehensive plan with specific targets for several, viable potential sources of diversified and sustainable fund that will be sought over the next 5 years, forging links where feasible to the fund development plan
D. Develop and implement diverse sources of funding to support the growth and sustain the long term matches.
Improve the functioning of the present Board
E. Establish a task force to pursue new, improved Board patterns
F. Keep all Board members involved, meaningfully engaged and informed so that any change/ transition will be made.
G. Complete an annual analysis of the skills needed on the Board, especially considering the new Strategic Plan/ Match needs with capabilities to the extent possible

Our organization has a highly qualified staff that is responsible for meeting our agency goals. Our agency's service and administrative metrics are monitored locally by our board of directors and nationally by our national office.

BBBS of Broward has each year met or exceeded our metrics and program goals and we have been recognized at our annual national conference for the meeting our goals.

Additionally our agency has a sophisticated data, information and outcome tracking system (Matchforce) that supports our professional staff that allows us to manage, measure and control real time work flow and adjust as needed.

We have accomplished many of our goals and strategies while always working towards growth in children served.

We have not been able to keep up with the pace of community need vs. sustainable funding. We have managed to grow and diversify our programs to provide stable service for the community.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Staff, volunteers and families living in Broward County.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are revising all of our orientation and interview packets through our internal diversity, equity, and inclusion committee. We have also redesigned our website and marketing collateral to best represent the population we serve.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    We value our volunteers and families and want them to know that when they share valuable feedback, we are listening. We hope that in doing so, we build a stronger communication bridge and mutual trust.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Broward, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Big Brothers Big Sisters of Broward, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 05/31/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr Guillermo "Willy" Gomez

Woodforest National Bank

Term: 2022 - 2024


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Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/31/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/31/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.