Champions for Children, Inc.

Family Education, Support, & Resources

aka Champions for Children   |   Tampa, FL   |  cfctb.org

Mission

Champions for Children builds stronger families in the Tampa Bay region through our child abuse prevention and family education programs. At Champions for Children, we believe... Every child deserves to feel safe at home and be successful in life. Families need accessible tools and programs to make family life the best it can be. Parents and caregivers want to nurture and bond with their babies, toddlers, and older children in healthy and productive ways. That's why our programs are designed to create positive adult-child attachments that protect against abuse and neglect. When children develop to their highest potential, the community benefits from better economic, civic, and health outcomes.

Ruling year info

1978

Executive Director

Mrs. Amy H Haile

Main address

3108 W Azeele St

Tampa, FL 33609 USA

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Formerly known as

Child Abuse Council

EIN

59-1807551

NTEE code info

Child Day Care (P33)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Champions for Children envisions a world without child abuse and neglect - where parents have the tools and resources they need to provide a nurturing environment for their children, and where children get the support they need to become productive members of society as adults. In Hillsborough County, where more children are removed from their homes due to child abuse and neglect than anywhere else in Florida, this mission is of paramount importance. Children who suffer repeated abuse, neglect, and other adverse childhood experiences are at a dramatically greater risk for negative outcomes from academic failure to substance abuse. They can also lose up to 20 years of life expectancy due to chronic health conditions and are 3x more likely to continue the cycle of abuse later in life. When children develop to their highest potential, the community benefits from improved economic, civic, and health outcomes. By working together, we can build stronger families with thriving children.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

abcProgram

Comprehensive prenatal education and breastfeeding support services led by certified professionals for families who are expecting or have recently welcomed a child into their lives.

Population(s) Served

A parent-child together learning and resource center with a series of educational playgroups and developmental screenings available in locations throughout Hillsborough County. Specific offerings are tailored to the developmental stages of participating children.

Population(s) Served

Parenting classes, new mom support groups, visitation playgroups, reflective groups, and child development seminars for mothers undergoing treatment for substance abuse at DACCO Behavioral Health. FLC also serves as an Eckerd Early Head Start and School Readiness Provider, enrolling children from newborn to 3 years old.

Population(s) Served

A parent-child together learning and resource center with workshops promoting strong attachment and healthy childhood development, offered bilingually in English and Spanish in a community-based setting in the Town ‘n’ Country area.

Population(s) Served

Offers fathers and fathers-to-be Nurturing Dads Program, Boot Camp for New Dads, and opportunities to connect with other dads.

Population(s) Served

Home visiting program that offers parents information on their child’s development; healthy ways of dealing with everyday stress; help setting and achieving personal and family goals; positive parenting and discipline skills; and connections to community services.

Population(s) Served

A parent-child together learning and resource center in the heart of Tampa’s Sulphur Springs Community, with services tailored toward parents of children aged birth to 5 years old, as well as expectant mothers.

Population(s) Served

Educational puppetry performances that teach Hillsborough County third and fourth graders how to safely recognize and report child abuse, neglect, and bullying when it happens to them or to their peers.

Population(s) Served

Home visiting program that uses the most current research to promote healthy development and school readiness for children and families, prenatal through kindergarten.

Population(s) Served

Tailored interventions designed to positively impact parenting skills; healthy relationships among co-parents; marriage and couple stability; financial health; and parenting confidence.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Council on Accreditation (COA) 2004

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes parents, caregivers and children served in all programs.

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2019 number represents 99% of 3594 total survey participants. Previous year numbers represent 99%, 98%, and 96% of survey participants in years 2018, 2017, and 2016, respectively.

Percentage of parents who are involved with their child's development after completing our programs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants who would recommend program to others

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

2018 number represents 99% of 1936 survey participants

Percentage of parents who increased their parenting skills.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

No target populations selected

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Champions for Children's mission to prevent child abuse and neglect through family education is operationalized by helping families to accomplish the following key goals:

(1) Develop parenting skills and knowledge that support strong, healthy parent-child attachments.
(2) Strengthen core life skills that contribute to improved family well-being.
(3) Reduce their sources of stress in order to mitigate risk factors for child abuse and neglect.
(4) Increase their knowledge of healthy child development, which is a key protective factor against child abuse and neglect.

In addition to these positive programmatic outcomes, Champions follows a strategic plan developed by the Board of Directors which establishes the following goals for related to organizational operations:

(1) Review and optimize programs to ensure relevance to current issues and demographic needs, as well as efficiency and effectiveness.
(2) Diversify and expand funding to ensure sustainability of programs.
(3) Increase community awareness to ensure strong recruitment of target population and public support.
(4) Maximize organizational capacity to ensure ability to deliver the highest quality programs possible.

Champions for Children accomplishes our programmatic goals by delivering a comprehensive range of science-based programs for families. These programs, which utilize dozens of distinct services offered at numerous locations throughout Hillsborough County, are organized into three core service strategies:

(1) Family Education and Individualized Support:
[a] Classes and Groups rooted in science and designed to help parents develop skills to raise healthy, thriving children.
[b] Individualized supports delivered by experts including professional lactation support for breastfeeding mothers, case management for families with high needs, and phone-based support via our Parent Warm Line.

(2) Parent-Child Educational Programs:
[a] Home visiting services and educational playgroups that utilize research-informed activities to help parents build strong, healthy attachments with their infants and toddlers while learning together.
[b] Developmental screenings for children help parents learn about their child’s progress, what to do when there are concerns, and how best to support them as they grow.

(3) Community Education:
[a] In-school educational puppet shows teaching children to safely recognize and report abuse, neglect, bullying and other personal safety issues.
[b] Public awareness activities designed to educate our community about issues affecting children and families and the opportunities to address them.

Strategies for achieving our operational goals regularly evolve according to ever-changing circumstances and needs. However, examples of recent strategies can be found under the "progress" section below.

Founded in 1977, Champions for Children has grown in the Tampa Bay area's leading agency dedicated exclusively to the prevention of child abuse and neglect through family education. Champions' programs and services have been nationally accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Children and Family Service Organizations (COA) since 2004. We have also been designated as Champions for Children Brazelton Touchpoints ™ Site of Tampa Bay and serve as the local anchor agency for the Tampa Bay arm of the nationally recognized Talk Read Sing Community Campaign.

Champions for Children is led by a Board of Directors composed of up to 30 members representing a broad cross-section of the Tampa Bay business, philanthropic, and social service communities. Day to day management of the organization is overseen by senior staff who are highly credentialed and experienced in their areas of work. In total, Champions employs a diverse team of approximately 120 full- and part-time employees who complete rigorous and ongoing training to ensure the highest possible quality, effectiveness, and cultural competency of services for the families who participate in our programs. More than a third of our staff are bilingual and a majority are people of color, reflecting the community we serve.

Every year, Champions undergoes an independent financial audit and consistently receives a clean report verifying strong financial position and practices. As a long-time recipient in good standing of federal, local, and private grant funding, Champions has a long and successful history of meeting or exceeding our programmatic outcomes and a demonstrated commitment to transparency, as exemplified both by quality contractual reporting and voluntary publication of results across diverse media.

Additionally our COA accreditation is renewed every four years, requiring a rigorous peer-driven process that ensures our services are well-coordinated, culturally competent, evidence-based, outcomes-oriented, and provided by a skilled and supported workforce. Over 2,000 organizations — voluntary, public, and proprietary; local and statewide; large and small — have either successfully achieved, or are in the process of, accreditation. Achieving COA accreditation means our organization is among the best in the field. We are proud to be a part of this community of excellence.

The following examples demonstrate Champions' progress during 2019 toward our programmatic outcomes. These examples are organized under the goals to which they correspond. After participating in our programs:

(1) Develop parenting skills and knowledge that support strong, healthy parent-child attachments.
[a] 93% of parents are active in supporting their child's healthy development
[b] 82% of parents increased their parenting skills

(2) Strengthen core life skills that contribute to improved family well-being.
[a] 73% of families experienced overall improved well-being
[b] 90% of parents reported increased social supports

(3) Reduce their sources of stress in order to mitigate risk factors for child abuse and neglect.
[a] 82% of parents reported fewer symptoms of depression
[b] 100% of parents reported increased connection to concrete supports

(4) Increase their knowledge of healthy child development, which is a key protective factor against child abuse and neglect.
[a] 94% of parents increased their knowledge of healthy and safety topics
[b] 88% of children increased their school readiness skills

Additionally, 87% of children who participated in our Kids on the Block educational puppetry performances increased their knowledge about topics including child abuse, neglect, bullying, and stereotyping.

With respect to our operational goals, here are just a few examples of progress we made in 2019, organized according to the goals with which they correspond:

(1) Review and optimize programs to ensure relevance to current issues and demographic needs, as well as efficiency and effectiveness.
- Completed a rigorous, expert-led examination of the effectiveness and value of every one of our program activities, which was reviewed and analyzed by staff leadership and the Board of Directors in order to support informed decision-making about program strategies.
- Identified and addressed a need for trauma-informed practices and training across all programs to ensure our staff are best equipped to serve families with high levels of trauma and need.

(2) Diversify and expand funding to ensure sustainability of programs.
- Secured 100% funding for our newest program via a multi-funder collaborative in which no single funder contributes a majority of revenue.
- Pursued funding for new or expanded programs primarily through new source.

(3) Increase community awareness to ensure strong recruitment of target population and public support.
- Grew social media viewership and engagement by more than 500%.
- Increased engagement with traditional press to promote the availability of our services to families who need them.

(4) Maximize organizational capacity to ensure ability to deliver highest quality programs possible.
- Leveraged new technology to increase efficiency of remote work and availability of "virtual
programming."
- Increased the % of our employees who are "moderately, very, or extremely satisfied" with their employment to 100%.

Financials

Champions for Children, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Champions for Children, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 8/5/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Kay Wilson

Richard Nielsen

13th Judicial Circuit Court

Laura-Elizabeth Ware

Oracle

Willisha Williams

TECO

Joan Zinober

Kimberly Renfroe

Tampa Bay Wallstreet

Parker Rabow

Florida Fantasy Fishing Camp

Kay Wilson

Liana Fox

Liana Fernandez Fox Consulting, Inc.

Dianne Jacob

PNC Bank

Daniel Perez

Mutual of Omaha Bank

Ruth Power

Central Florida Behavioral Health Network

Lara Fernandez

Trenam

Ann Gormly

Stacey Pittman

Bank of Tampa

Marian Winters

Malcolm Harris

Greg Hargrove

Raymond James

Bonnie Saks

Private Practice

Lisa Wilkerson

St. Joseph's Hospital Foundation

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes