Harvest Tabernacle Of Sarasota Inc

Revitalizing Neighboorhoods

aka Harvest House   |   SARASOTA, FL   |  www.harvesthousecenters.org

Mission

Our mission is to champion hope and transform lives by revitalizing neighborhoods and providing service-enriched housing programs. Our model is the standard for serving members of our community who are working to rebuild their lives. We believe that affordable and supportive housing programs improve economic status, revitalize neighborhoods, and stabilize lives for generations to come.

Ruling year info

1983

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Erin E Minor

Co Principal Officer

Rev. James W Minor

Main address

3650 17th Street

SARASOTA, FL 34235 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-2186807

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Low-Cost Temporary Housing (includes Youth Hostels) (L40)

Public Housing (L21)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a church.

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Home Again

Permanent Supportive Housing - 26 Apartments for families who are homeless. Families in the Home Again program receive up to 24 months of supportive housing with case management and life-skills classes to further prepare families for meaningful employment and housing stability. We believe personal responsibility is key to success, therefore families pay a maximum of 30% of their income for rent, utilities, and services. 14 apartments are subsidized by HUD to serve those that meet HUDs 'chronically homeless' definition. 12 apartments are subsidized through private donations from individual donors and foundations like the Charles & Margery Barancik Foundation, allowing Harvest House to serve families that are at risk of being chronically homeless but are still experiencing homelessness.

Population(s) Served
Families
Economically disadvantaged people

20 Beds for U.S. Military Veterans who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. Transitional Housing with case management and educational groups assist in the recovery process and prepare vets for meaningful employment & housing stability as they transition out of life-limiting patterns & into freedom.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Substance abusers

The Freedom program is a residential recovery program modeled as a hybrid between a halfway-house and an intensive in-patient recovery program. There are 78 beds for men and 22 beds for women who are struggling with alcohol and/or drug addiction. Participants can stay up to 12 months to receive residential recovery with case management and life-enrichment classes. This holistic approach to recovery treats the mind, body, and spirit, and prepares individuals for meaningful employment and housing stability as they transition out of life-limiting patterns into freedom.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Substance abusers
Homeless people
Victims and oppressed people
Incarcerated people

New Heights Transitional Living Program A progressive program is specifically designed for 18 to 24-year-old young adults who are experiencing homelessness. The young adults live in a shared, dorm-like setting along with other program participants. This supportive housing program with 9 beds is designed to help young adults reach new heights in seven key areas of life: Vocation, Education, Social, Financial, Health, Leadership, and Dreams. Outreach A Young Adult Advocate seeks out unaccompanied youth congregating in places not meant for habitation throughout Sarasota County to build rapport and engage them in stabilization services. Case Management Support services connecting homeless youth with safe housing, employment, and other crucial services. Drop-In Center (YOUth Center) A safe place for youth to recharge during the day and access services and support groups designed just for them Youth Action Board The Youth Action Board is made up of young leaders ages 16-24 that are a voice in the creation and implementation of a comprehensive and coordinated plan for unaccompanied youth in our community.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
LGBTQ people
Young adults
Young men
Young women

Family Haven (Emergency Shelter) - 24 beds in 6 dorm-style apartments for families and 4 beds for homeless unaccompanied young women ages 18-24 who are found living in unsuitable conditions and are in need of immediate, same-day housing. The Family Haven is the emergency housing solution for homeless families in Sarasota County. The participants work with case managers to secure longer-term transitional and permanent housing solutions, whether within Harvest House or with another agency. There is no cost to participants for these emergency services. Transitional Housing - 5 apartments for homeless families needing more time to stabilize after 30 days in the emergency shelter. There is no cost for this program.

Population(s) Served

Through the Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) HUD provided money to local governments, nonprofits, and all 50 states for the purpose of stabilizing communities that have suffered from foreclosures and abandonment. NSP partners acquired and rehabilitated properties to sell or rent to low- and moderate-income households. Harvest House is honored to participate in this nationwide program with 25 affordable rental units throughout Sarasota and Manatee Counties. Many of these units are inhabited by former clients who worked hard to end the cycle of homelessness in their family. NSP contributes to our overall mission of revitalizing neighborhoods and transforming lives.

Population(s) Served

We find that occasionally Freedom graduates benefit from continued supportive housing during their next steps in recovery. In our Graduate Housing program, tenants sign a lease at an affordable rate that includes their rent and utilities, and they maintain access to the supportive services of the Freedom program, including the life-skills classes, support groups, and our loving community. For some, this is a necessary step after recovery from addiction and finding sustainable housing. Others will never be able to live on their own due to age and/or pre-existing conditions.

Population(s) Served

Because of the service and seasonal economic environment here in Sarasota County, 33% of residents are one crisis away from poverty, and often make desperate choices to make ends meet.* We never want anyone to have to choose between a rent or mortgage payment and feeding their family. Pastors Jim and Peggy Minor moved to Sarasota in 1984 and discovered many struggling men, women, and children. They began their outreach in the community with the Harvest Food Pantry. “I remember sitting down and recognizing that so many people were coming for food because they had an issue with drugs and alcohol,” Pastor Jim recalls. “We needed to create a safe place for them and that’s how Harvest House was born.” Every week, the Harvest Food Pantry distributes an average of 50lbs of fresh fruit, vegetables, meat, and dry goods to each family. In 2019, over 670,000 lbs of food were distributed to more than 10,000 Sarasota families. The Harvest Food Pantry is also a resource for other local nonprofits and special outreaches, such as group homes for foster children and the elderly, as well as Harvest House clients. We have many partners whom we receive donations from or purchase food at a discounted rate, including Trader Joe’s, All Faith’s Food Bank, Fresh Market, and Publix. This is all possible thanks to our partners and dedicated volunteers. For distribution times, please visit: harvesthousecenters.org/harvestfoodpantry Our new facility on Princeton Street has provided great opportunity for increased partnerships with other agencies who need food to distribute to those they serve, and the ability to better receive food, sort, store and distribute. We have been able to receive donated goods from two 7-Eleven stores. The food received from 7-Eleven is already prepared, therefore it provides us foods that those experiencing homelessness are able to eat without a kitchen. We have continued to pick up from Trader Joe's daily, averaging 4,000 pounds weekly. We started a garden compost program. This enables us to recycle produce that is undesirable and donate the compost to those who want to start their own garden, including families in the Harvest House Home Again. Each family has their own GrowBox. Harvest House teaches them how to care for a small garden. This activity gives them the opportunity to learn new skills, enjoy the outdoors, and bond with one another.

Population(s) Served
Families
Parents
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
Families
Parents
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
Families
Parents
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
Substance abusers
Families
Parents
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
Families
Parents
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
Families
Parents
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
Substance abusers

Where we work

Awards

Affiliations & memberships

AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals)

Florida Public Relations Association

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Individuals, veterns, and families experiencing homelessness, mental illness, and substance abuse.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We created a new housing program specifically for young adult males ages 18-24.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.),

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Harvest Tabernacle Of Sarasota Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Harvest Tabernacle Of Sarasota Inc

Board of directors
as of 3/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. James Minor

Sarasota County School Board

Term: 2017 - 2019

Daniel Minor

Harvest Tabernacle of Sarasota, Inc

Mel Tari

Mel Tari Evangelistic Association

Cleo Ammons

Retired

Angela Bibler

Retired

Rico Boeras

Realtor

James Minor

Sarasota County School Board

Carolyn Mason

Retired

Laura Russo

Community Volunteer

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 03/12/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data