Agriculture, Food, Nutrition

Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida, Inc.

Fighting Hunger, Feeding Hope

Fort Myers, FL

Mission

The Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida's mission is leading our community in the fight to end hunger.

Notes from the Nonprofit

The Harry Chapin Food Bank was able to offer vital relief in the wake of Hurricane Irma through the Recover, Rebuild, Restore Campaign. The Food Bank organized more than 72 emergency mobile pantry distributions and supplied hurricane victims with over 2 million pounds of food, water, and essential resources.

Ruling Year

1984

President and CEO

Richard LeBer

Main Address

3760 Fowler Street

Fort Myers, FL 33901 USA

Keywords

Food bank, anti-hunger advocacy, procurement and distribution of food, cooperative effort with affiliated agencies.

EIN

59-2332120

 Number

7879308457

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

One in seven Southwest Floridians struggles with hunger, including one in four children.

You probably know someone who quietly goes hungry. She is the single parent who works in your office but skips dinner so her children can eat. He is the tired little boy who sits next to your child at school and struggles to pay attention in class. They are your elderly neighbors who forego groceries to pay for their medicine.

What began in 1983 as a grassroots organization committed to feeding people like Sharon has grown into a respected nonprofit that leads the largest anti-hunger network in Southwest Florida. We rescue food that would otherwise go to waste and provide it to a network of more than 150 partner agencies that feed individuals in need in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee counties. These partner agencies feed 28,000 people a week.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Mobile Pantries

Fresh Produce

Care & Share: Senior Feeding Campaign

In-school Pantries

Partner Agencies

Where we workNew!

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Pounds of food distributed per year, in millions.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Context notes

Pounds of food distributed per year in our five-county service area, in millions.

Pounds of fresh produce distributed per year, in millions.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Related program

Fresh Produce

Context notes

Pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables distributed in our five-county service area, per year, in millions.

Number of meal equivalents per year, in millions.

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people

Context notes

Number of meal equivalents distributed per year, in millions, based on the United States Department of Agriculture estimate that 1 meal equals 1.2 pounds of food.

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

The Harry Chapin Food Bank intends to end hunger in Southwest Florida. This will require us to grow substantially. Today, it would take 37.5 million pounds of food—or 31.3 million meals—to adequately feed everyone in our area who is hungry. That is about 74% larger than our current distribution, and the amount continues to grow as our population grows.

To meet this audacious challenge, we continue to build on strategic initiatives that enable us to:
• FEED people when they most need food;
• LEAD our community in the fight to end hunger;
• STRENGTHEN our infrastructure and partner agencies even more so that we have the means and capacity to fulfill our mission and vision.

As the leader of the largest anti-hunger network in Southwest Florida, the Harry Chapin Food Bank is uniquely positioned to end hunger in our community. We continue to engage with our partners and supporters to educate our region about hunger, nutrition and feeding campaigns. We also work with our partners to better understand the needs of our clients.

We provide quality food to more than 150 nonprofit organizations. These agencies operate food pantries, after-school programs, soup kitchens, and other feeding programs. Two-thirds of the food they provide to clients comes from the Harry Chapin Food Bank. By partnering with us, these organizations are able to focus their attention on what they do best: serving people in need.

The Food Bank distributes food directly to children and low-income families living, working, and going to school in underserved communities through the mobile pantry program. Each day, our mobile pantry truck rolls into a community park, church or school parking lot, or other site. The truck doors open, and our driver and volunteers arrange an array of fresh produce, canned food, bread, and grains on tables for a line of waiting clients. We can serve up to 250 families per distribution.

The In-school Pantry Program helps solve child hunger by providing nutritious food to children and their families when they need it most, in convenient, familiar, and safe locations. In- school pantries operate within the school, and enlist the school staff and parents to distribute food kits to hungry families in low-income areas.

Launched in the summer of 2017, the Care & Share: Senior Feeding Campaign supplements the diets of 2,200 low-income, hungry seniors in Charlotte, Collier, and Lee counties with nutritious, easy-to prepare food. Seniors receive kits containing canned fruits and vegetables, protein, grains, cereal, and other food each month. When possible, we provide fresh produce with these kits.

By some estimates, almost half of the food in America—about 126 billion pounds—goes to waste. Rescuing food that would otherwise go to waste is key to our mission of leading our community in the fight to end hunger. Last year alone, the Harry Chapin Food Bank rescued and distributed 14.9 million pounds of food—the equivalent of 12.4 million meals.

Every week, we collect shelf-stable and perishable food from more than 140 retailers in our five-county area. Donations include frozen meat and deli items, baked goods, and other food that retailers clear from their shelves to make room for new inventory.

Last year, almost 6,100 volunteers contributed 40,390 hours of service. They helped feed our community by:
• Sorting food brought in by retail store pickups and food drives;
• Staffing program distributions such as mobile pantries;
• Helping with special events and other fundraisers;
• Assisting at food distributions and program activities at our partner agencies;
• Providing skilled volunteer services.

It takes a lot to feed 28,000 people each week, and we must do more to meet everyone's needs. That takes hard work, dedication and experience, not to mention computer systems, vehicles, and facilities. We continue to invest in our capabilities so that we can meet today's need, and grow for tomorrow.

Because of our ability to rescue and distribute food efficiently, the amount of food we provide to Southwest Floridians in need has grown to 22.3 million pounds, or 18.6 million meals, a 31% increase since 2013. At the heart of our operations is our 55,000- square-foot Distribution Center in Fort Myers. Each day, the Distribution Center receives an average of 85,800 pounds of food that are bound for our partner agencies and our mobile pantries. Our staff and volunteers sort and repack donations for distribution.
Critical to our mission to feed people is our fleet of trucks. Our trucks travel more than 251,000 miles a year as drivers collect and deliver food in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee counties.

In fiscal year 2017, the food bank distributed 22.3 million pounds of food, including 6.6 million pounds of produce, to children, families, seniors and others through a network of 150 agencies operating emergency food programs. Valued at more than $37.3 million, this food equals approximately 18.6 million meals.

When children, working-poor families, and seniors receive the food they need when they need it, their lives are transformed. Children are ready to learn and flourish in school, parents are more productive at work, and seniors can lead healthier lives. Each day, the Harry Chapin Food Bank transforms lives by providing food to our
most vulnerable neighbors in need. We achieve this by being one of the most efficient nonprofits in Southwest Florida.

We provide our 150 partner-agency network with approximately two-thirds of their food. This service enables our agencies to focus directly on clients and their unique programs. The Food Bank is client-focused with 97% of our budget used to provide food and programs to serve our community.

Our food-rescue model allows us to turn every $1 of funding into $8 worth of food for our clients.

External Reviews

Affiliations & Memberships

United Way Member Agency

Florida Association of Food Banks

Feeding America

Fresh From Florida

Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Fort Myers Chamber of Commerce

Financials

Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida, Inc.

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

Need more info on this nonprofit?

Need more info on this nonprofit?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2017 and 2016
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to view a Sample Report.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2017 and 2016
A Pro report is also available for this organization for $125.
Click here to see what's included.

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members, Senior Staff, Full-Time Staff and Part-Time Staff.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity