Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida, Inc.

Fighting Hunger, Feeding Hope

Fort Myers, FL   |  https://www.harrychapinfoodbank.org

Mission

The mission of Harry Chapin Food Bank is to lead our community in the fight to end hunger.

Notes from the nonprofit

In FY 2020, Harry Chapin Food Bank distributed 34.2 million pounds of food, including 9.6 million pounds of fresh produce. This food equates to 28.5 million meals with a retail value of $59.5 million. The Food Bank distributes food through its food distribution programs throughout Charlotte, Collier, Lee, Hendry, and Glades counties. The Food Bank serves more than a quarter of a million people each month. Volunteers are vital to the success of our programs. Last year, 7,363 volunteers collectively provided more than 60,673 hours, which equate to more than $1.5 million of in-kind services. Of every dollar invested in Harry Chapin Food Bank, 96 cents goes directly into our food distribution programs to ensure that no one has to go hungry.

Ruling year info

1984

President and CEO

Richard LeBer

Main address

3760 Fowler Street

Fort Myers, FL 33901 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Lee County Food Cooperative

EIN

59-2332120

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Harry Chapin Food Bank serves children, families, seniors, and veterans of Southwest Florida. Children who are food-insecure do not have the energy to focus, engage, learn, and grow. Poor nutrition also has a long-term negative effect on a child’s physical and mental health, academic achievement, and future economic productivity. Families that are food-insecure not only struggle to put food on the table, they often struggle to pay for rent, utilities, and childcare, among other bills. Food pantries, once considered a resource for temporary emergency food assistance, are now part of many households' regular coping strategies. Seniors who are food-insecure live on a fixed income, struggle with health issues that can drain their resources, lack transportation, and are socially isolated. They often have nutritional deficiencies which exacerbate their medical issues. The stigma associated with asking for help further compounds the problem.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Fulfill Mobile Pantries

The Fulfill Mobile Pantries expands the capacity of Harry Chapin Food Bank to make food more accessible in underserved and high need areas where families with limited financial resources may not be able to access food through traditional grocery stores.

Through our Fulfill Mobile Pantries, a truckload of food is distributed to those who are hungry through a farmer’s market-style distribution where those who are food-insecure can choose to take what they need. Our mobile pantries distribute fresh produce, canned and dry goods, frozen meat, bread, grains, and other food.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

This application-only program aims to supplement the diets of 2,200 seniors with low incomes in Charlotte, Collier and Lee Counties. Harry Chapin works with selected partner agencies and senior housing sites to not only identify participants but also to serve as distribution centers for the Care and Share Senior Feeding Program. Monthly, these seniors are provided food kits that contain easy-to-prepare foods, cheese, shelf-stable fruits and vegetables, proteins, grains, and milk. Kits contain, if possible, bread, fresh produce, and frozen meats.

Population(s) Served
Seniors
Economically disadvantaged people

Our In-School Pantry program follows an evidence-based system that alleviates child hunger through food distribution at carefully selected schools. This nationally acclaimed food distribution model, taken from Feeding America, is designed to provide an accessible source of food assistance to students and their families in need. Harry Chapin Food Bank stocks the in-school pantries with shelf-stable foods. By locating pantries inside schools, students and their families have easier access to food assistance and feel more comfortable accessing food assistance in this manner.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

The Partner Agency Program relies on a carefully selected network of partner agencies. Our food distribution network includes more than 150 partner agencies that serve Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee Counties. Our vetted agencies include social service agencies, faith-based congregations, nonprofits, and community organizations that rely on our fleet of refrigerated trucks to acquire food we have rescued from our network of food sources. Our partner agencies distribute our shelf-stable fruits, vegetables, proteins, grains and milk. We also distribute fresh produce and other perishable foods that we rescue from grocery stores and local farms. We provide our partner agencies with more than 70% of their food inventory.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Unemployed people

This innovative feeding program provides emergency food kits for families. These kits are filled with enough nutritious food for more than 15 meals. They may include canned vegetables and canned meat, cereal, spaghetti, macaroni and cheese, soups and stews, peanut butter, jelly, pasta, rice and beans. They are distributed to children and education centers where traditional feeding programs are not feasible due to space constraints, staffing or other reasons.

Population(s) Served
Infants and toddlers
Children and youth

Where we work

Awards

4-Star Charity 2017

Charity Navigator

Affiliations & memberships

United Way Member Agency

Florida Association of Food Banks

Feeding America

American Institute of Baking 2018

Charity Navigator 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Pounds of food distributed per year, in millions.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Pounds of food distributed per year in our five-county footprint, in millions.

Pounds of fresh produce distributed per year, in millions.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Pounds of fresh fruits and vegetables distributed in our five-county footprint, per year, in millions.

Number of meal equivalents per year, in millions.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of meal equivalents distributed per year, in millions, based on the United States Department of Agriculture estimate that 1 meal equals 1.2 pounds of food.

Number of people within the organization's service area accessing food aid

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of people served each month in five-county footprint through our food distribution programs.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Harry Chapin Food Bank intends to end hunger in Southwest Florida.
To meet this audacious challenge, we continue to build on strategic initiatives that enable us to:
• FEED people when and where they need it most;
• LEAD our community in the fight to end hunger;
• STRENGTHEN our infrastructure and partner agencies so that we have
the means and capacity to fulfill our mission and vision.

As the largest hunger relief nonprofit and the only Feeding America member in Southwest Florida, Harry Chapin Food Bank is uniquely positioned to lead our community in the fight against hunger. Our multifaceted approach is leveraged by our membership with Feeding America and includes rescuing food that would otherwise go to waste from various retail and grocery stores, national food providers and farms. We rescue produce from local farms that are not part of the Feeding America relationship as an extension of our food rescue strategy. Locally, countless organizations, communities and businesses collect and donate food that we use in conjunction with our food rescue. The food is distributed through our programs. Our programs include Care and Share: Senior Feeding Program, Harry’s Helpings, Fulfill Mobile Pantries and In-School Pantries and our Partner Agency Program which is a network of more than 150 partner agencies to feed people who are hungry in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee Counties. Through these distribution programs, Harry Chapin Food Bank feeds more than a quarter of a million people each month.

Harry Chapin Food Bank's engaged board of directors, experienced executive team, committed staff and dedicated volunteer workforce provide the talent to execute the mission to lead the community in the fight to end hunger. At the heart of our operations is our 55,000- square-foot Fort Myers Distribution Center and our 14,000 square-foot Collier County Center. Each day, the food bank receives an average of 125,000 pounds of food that are bound for our food distribution programs. Our team of over 7,000 volunteers sort and repack donations for distribution. Critical to our mission to feed people is our fleet of trucks. Our trucks travel more than 251,000 miles a year as drivers collect and deliver food in Charlotte, Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee counties. Every week, we collect shelf-stable and perishable food from more than 140 retailers in our five-county footprint.

Harry Chapin Food Bank is a member of Feeding America, the nation’s largest hunger-relief nonprofit. Feeding America’s mission is to feed America’s hungry through a nationwide network of approximately 200 member food banks. This network allows for open communication of ideas and best practices in food banking optimizing each organization’s effectiveness. Feeding America hosts department-specific conferences each year for its members, encouraging new ideas and successes to spread across the network. Feeding America brokers national relationships that leverage the distribution of food that would otherwise go to waste.

Harry Chapin Food Bank is a member of Feeding Florida. Feeding Florida unites 12 Feeding America member food banks with one voice for advocacy at the state and national levels and ensures a leveraging of resources, both funds and food, to the membership.

In 2020, our staff of 57 was supported by 7,363 volunteers who gave 60,673 hours of service to Harry Chapin Food Bank. We distributed 34.2 million pounds of food including more than 9.6 million pounds of fresh produce throughout our five-county footprint. Valued at $59.5 million, this food equals roughly 28.5 million meals for those who are hungry.

Financials

Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Harry Chapin Food Bank of Southwest Florida, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

William Dillion

Dillon Chartered

Term: 2019 - 2021

P.Keith Scoggins

Attorney, Retired General Counsel Farm Credit System

Pat Nevins

Retired

John Clinger

Clinger, Sizemore & Assoc., Merrill Lynch

James Nolte

Wells-Fargo Advisors

Kayla Miller

Henderson, Franklin, Starnes & Holt, P.A.

Mark Levine

Retired

Kathleen Johnson

Miller, Helms, & Folk, P.A.

Maria Larriva

Gerard A. McHale, Jr. P.A.

Scott Bass

Glades County School District

Precious Gunter

Florida Gulf Coast University

Linda Stuart

Retired

Jill Turner

Retired

Marianne Lentini

Retired

Anne Rose

Lee Health System

Veronica Larriva

McHale, PA.

Lois Thome

WINK News

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/07/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data