Salvadoran American Humanitarian Foundation, Inc.

Love El Salvador

aka SAHF   |   Miami, FL   |  http://www.sahf.org

Mission

To enhance the well-being of the underserved people in El Salvador through human development programs implemented in partnership with our in-country sister Foundation, FUSAL, and other organizations.

Ruling year info

1984

Executive Director

Mr. Carlos R. Reyes

Main address

2050 Coral Way Ste #600

Miami, FL 33145 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-2339140

NTEE code info

Nutrition Programs (K40)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Nutrition Programs (K40)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Twenty five percent of children being born in rural El Salvador are born with a degree of malnutrition. In 2004, SAHF along with its sister organization began the LIbras de Amor Integral Nutritional Program, now know at the Early Childhood Developement Program to address this pressing issue. If a child is not nourished properly in the first 1000 days of life, all other opportunities presented to them will be in vain as their cognitive skills will be difficult to achieve.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

WeSUPPORT

Since 1983, SAHF has collected and distributed through its sister Foundation in El Salvador:FUSAL, more than $700 million worth of in-kind humanitarian assistance and medical aid to the country's most needy. This program began by distributing medicines, medical supplies and equipment to hospitals, clinics, health posts, orphanages and nursing homes and now has been extended to schools. This program has national coverage as it makes available donations to over 2,500 rural health promoters. It is these individuals whom the Foundation focuses on when requesting medicines and medical supplies. Each of these men and women can provide health care attention to approximately 500 Salvadorans who live in the most remote areas of the country. At the same time all hospitals, health posts, clinics, orphanages, nursing homes and other agencies throughout El Salvador that cater to the needy are recipients of donated material, increasing even more the target most needy population being served. The distribution program is one that is highly structurized as we have complete records of each beneficiary institution that receives our aid. For instance we know the number of beds, number of patients it serves, and their medical specialties. In addition, every product that is donated is entered into a computerized database thus allowing the Foundation to know exactly where each product is being used. The Distribution Program gave birth to the Rural Health Program. Its main objective is to provide quality medicines to people who live in the hardest to reach places of the country. Since 1994 we have been providing medical assistance, environmental awareness, educational programs to two of the most remote and poorest areas of the El Salvador. The combined population of these two communities is over 47,000. The Luis Poma Training Center is our third program. This one aims to provide a state of the arts facility where Rural Health Workers can be educated in issues pertaining to health, environment, and education. They then implement their learning to the members of their respected communities. For further information please visit us at: www.sahf.org

Population(s) Served
Adults

n 2004, an extensive nutrition-based program, Libras de Amor or Pounds of Love, was designed to overcome malnutrition in children under the age of 5 who live in rural El Salvador. Over the years, our work in healthcare showcased the intense impact nutrition has on a person’s general well-being and progress. Originally the program began in the community of Apaneca where malnutrition rates were as high as 47%. That percentage has dropped to an overall low of 11% since work began there. Currently there are 18 communities that are being served and there are 128,132 beneficiary participants.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

At Residencial Libertad, more than 4,000 people have the opportunity to have decent housing, quality education,
free health services and common areas.
The housing complex of 1,800 homes has access to all basic services, with adequate
open-spaces for a family and their full development. The sports complex provides a
top-level space for recreation and community activities. Children and young people
take advantage of the courts and facilities to practice disciplines such as: soccer,
basketball, boxing, martial arts, art, drawing and painting. All activities encourage
conversation, peaceful problem solving, respect towards others and emotional
management.
The health clinic regularly serves 80% of the people in Residencial Libertad. Among
the services offered are: preventive controls, nutritional surveillance, care for pregnant
women, prevention of anemia and nutritional monitoring, sexual and reproductive
healthcare; as well as follow up on cases that were referred to a hospital.
The school at Residencial Libertad is run by a group of Franciscan sisters and offers
free education from kindergarten through high school with different subjects such
as: Accounting, Tourism, Health, Networks and Design. This Educational Center
is recognized for its high academic level and for the values instilled in children.
Here 1,160 students strengthen the skills, knowledge and attitudes necessary to
successfully face the challenges of the times where studies and the labor force are concerned.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2016

Charity Navigator 2021

BBB Wise Giving Alliance 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of physician visits that include nutrition and diet counseling

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Infants and toddlers

Related Program

Libras de Amor Integral Nutritional Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Part of the success of the Libras de Amor Program is the ability to monitor a child's growth and weight. This is accomplished by the doctor visits that are done to a community twice a month.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The main goal of the Libras de Amor Integral Nutritional Program, now known as the Early Childhood Development Program is to reduce the indices of malnutrition in children under the age of 5 who live in the most affected rural communities of El Salvador and to promote activities that aid a child to develop to his/hers greatest potential.

The strategies behind this program are based on the transformation of an individual by encouraging and exploring their highest potential and knowledge. This is accomplished by a series of interventions by our professional team of doctors, nurses and nutritionists who live in the communities where the program is being implemented. The program not only contemplates the child but also the family as a whole as it is they who will in turn ensure the success of the program. There are three main strategies that are implemented in this program. These are: Access and Accessibility to Food, Healthy Child Rearing Practices and Nutrition. This program contemplates an exit strategy after 5 to 7 years of involvement in each community. It is believed that after this period of time, residents will have learned new ways to raise their children thus allowing the community to go forward with the knowledge gained. The foundation will continue to monitor progress but not be involved in day to day activities.

Thirty-seven years of serving the less fortunate in El Salvador have given the foundation the ability and capabilities to be part of the changing fabric of the communities we serve. Where the Early Childhood Development Program is concerned, foundation leaders decided 17 years ago that to create a big impact in the lives of those being served that we needed to create a program that would have long-lasting and permanent changes. To us, nutrition was the most important as it is the first step towards a child's achievement of full development. Without proper nutrition, a child's opportunities for growth are limited.

The accomplishments of this program are numerous. In the Community of Guaymango there are 26 municipalities, 14 villages, and 56 hamlets and the program lasted from 2008 until 2020, the results were very encouraging. During this time, 11,626 families participated in the program that included 14,553 children under the age of 5; as well as 1,608 expecting mothers. More than 3,400 activities were performed by our in-country staff during these 12 years of service.

Some of the indicators that are worth noticing: Chronic malnutrition went from 41% to 25%. Anemia went from 40% to 10%. Exclusive breastfeeding went from 70% to 96%. Children with proper development went from 72% to 91%. Just as an example, in the first community we began the Libras de Amor Program in 2004, the rate of malnourished children was 47% and by 2019 89% percent of children born had adequate weight.

In 2020 we began working in a new community of El Salvador called California and Puerto el Triunfo in the State of Usulutan. Here we have done a baseline and determined that 17% of children under two in California and 26% in Puerto El Triunfo are suffering from anemia. As we begin work in these two communities it is our goal to lower those indices as much as possible by implementing strategies that have been successful in the program.

Financials

Salvadoran American Humanitarian Foundation, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Salvadoran American Humanitarian Foundation, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/19/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Jose Eduardo Siman

INTRADECO APPAREL

Term: 1997 -


Board co-chair

Mr. Ernesto Poma

TRANSAL CORPORATION

Term: 1997 -

Guillermo Argumedo

Daniel Schwartz

Raul Henriquez

Magda Lie-Nielsen

Enrique Yaffar

Leon Avila

Julio Villafañe

William Freund

Maria Nazari

Lia Yaffar-Peña

Camila Zablah

Carlos Barahona

Francisco Lainez

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/17/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Male
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability