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INTERFAITH EMERGENCY SERVICES INC

God's Hand Extended to Those in Need

Ocala, FL   |  www.iesmarion.org

Mission

Interfaith Emergency Services is a community of faith called by God to offer emergency assistance without judgment to all persons in Marion County.

Notes from the nonprofit

Interfaith has been a beacon of Hope in Marion County for 40 years and the ongoing support from the local community is a testimony to our commitment to being responsible stewards of the resources we are given. Interfaith has continued to apply 93% of every dollar donated directly to serving those in need.

Ruling year info

1984

Chief Executive Officer

Mrs. Karla Grimsley Greenway

Main address

PO Box 992

Ocala, FL 34478 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

59-2349840

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Temporary Shelter For the Homeless (L41)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Emergency Assistance

Interfaith provides a full range of emergency services and assistance. We serve individuals and families with children by providing basic needs to enhance their quality of life and items that will help them secure employment. Services include emergency food, clothing, prescription medications, identification cards, hygiene items, eye glasses and work boots. Interfaith has been helping its’ neighbors for 30 years in Marion County.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Homeless people

Our Food 4 Kids backpack program provides food in backpacks to fight hunger for elementary age children on the weekends. Our "backpack program" as it's termed, was created to provide food for each child that qualifies at the school level for assistance. Backpacks can include: canned meat, shelf-stable milk, peanut butter and jelly, soup, apple sauce, boxes, cereal, etc. Thanks to donations and volunteers, we partner with 32 schools in Marion County, typically feeding over 1,450 children each week for a total of 8,700 meals. Food 4 Kids makes a huge difference in the lives of hungry children by enabling them to focus on learning instead of their hunger and keeping them healthy and nourished which enables them to learn.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Our Shelter Program for homeless families, single women and children. Our shelter provides 100% support while residents stay with us. Along with chores and responsibilities each day, residents are required to look for work, be working or volunteering. Children are enrolled in school/daycare and have afterschool tutoring if needed. Classes are provided for budgeting, parenting, goal-setting, life skills and other relevant needs. Residents meet weekly with a case worker that helps transition them to stable, self-supporting lifestyle on their own. They also meet with a Job Hunter for specific training for job seeking, resume building and various appropriate skills. The ultimate goal of our shelter program is to end homelessness, one family at a time.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people

Provides emergency assistance for life-saving prescriptions for those without insurance. Also provides facilities for a free medical, dental and mental health clinic.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Economically disadvantaged people

Interfaith provides grocery assistance to Marion County residents in need. Clients can come once per month to receive a grocery cart full of food items including meat, produce, canned goods and dry non-perishable items. This program serves up to 500 households every week.

Population(s) Served

Interfaith operates the 14th Street Apartments which included14 units. Five of the units are single-room occupancy units that provide permanent supportive housing to individuals that were previously chronically homeless and suffer from a disabling condition. The other 8 units are offered to families or individuals who income qualify at 150% of the poverty level. These units are offered at a discounted rent rate of $525 per month. Tenants much income qualify each year for lease renewal.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people
Economically disadvantaged people
Victims and oppressed people

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Interfaith serves individuals, families, veterans, senior citizens, the disabled, and the homeless in our community by providing basic needs such as emergency food, clothing, prescription medications, identification cards, hygiene items, eye glasses and work boots. Our goal is simple – to help as many people in the community as we can, with the least amount of funding. Interfaith is donation based, and relies on our local community for most of our funding. We are supported by local individuals, businesses, churches and organizations through financial and physical donations. In the last 30 years, our organization has made a positive, lasting impact on our community by meeting these critical needs. Our goal is to continue to reach out to our community to maintain a lasting relationship with donors and provide the most effective emergency services to those in need.

Interfaith believes in partnering with our local community to reach the most people. Through our “Bring the Harvest Home” program, we seek to partner with local business and churches to provide monthly donations of food and hygiene items. By assigning a monthly commitment from local partners, we are guaranteed an influx of donations each month. A local church can provide as much as 15,000 pounds of food in one month. Financially, one of our greatest tools is our monthly newsletter. Currently our newsletter is mailed to over 2,600 subscribers and 400 email subscribers, from which 52% of our donations are received from enclosed donor envelopes. With nearly 500 followers, our Facebook page is also a great tool for reaching out to the local community when a specific need arises or to advertise for special events.

With just 25 staff members we rely largely on our volunteers for our workforce. Our volunteers are connected throughout our community and help spread the word when we have special needs or events. Likewise, our Board Members are a wide variety of local professionals that step up to assist us. We are fortunate to be supported by several local government officials and can often reach out to them when a critical need arises and they help spearhead food drives. Also, our local newspaper often does articles for our food pantry when donations are needed for the community or to highlight special events. Many of our staff members are connected through local clubs and organizations throughout the community, so that we can leverage those relationships to benefit our organization. Together, our staff, board and volunteers connect within our community to meet the needs for those that need our help.

In the last two years, we opened a new building called the Center for Life - which was created to provide free medical, dental, vision and mental health for those that are without insurance. We also provide our prescription assistance program in that facility that provides life-saving medical prescriptions for those without insurance coverage.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

INTERFAITH EMERGENCY SERVICES INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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INTERFAITH EMERGENCY SERVICES INC

Board of directors
as of 09/22/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mrs Rebecca OConnor


Board co-chair

Mr Wally Wagoner

Wesley Wheeler

retired business owner

Anne Parker

community advocate

Winn Keeton

Banking

Craig Baggs

community advocate

Quinette Durkin

community advocate

John Bradish

logistic management

Rebecca OConnor

Civil Engineer

Mary Beth Nealy

retired

Michael Jordan

retired physician

Monica Bryant

DV Prevention Advocate

Doug Day

CPA

Alejandra Arango

Equine

Kent Adams

Business Owner

Wally Wagoner

Retired School Administrator

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/22/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Human
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/22/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.