Human Services

PACE CENTER FOR GIRLS INC

aka PACE

Jacksonville, FL

Mission

PACE provides girls and young women an opportunity for a better future through education, counseling, training and advocacy. PACE values all girls and young women, believing each one deserves the opportunity to find her voice, achieve her potential and celebrate a life defined by responsibility, dignity, serenity and grace.

PACE is a nationally recognized and research based model that features a balanced emphasis on academics and social services with a focus on the future for middle and high-school aged girls and young women. The foundation of PACE is the gender-responsive culture, providing a safe environment that celebrates girls, services that take into account how girls learn and develop, and staff members who understand the lives of girls and can respond to their strengths and challenges. With a demonstrated record of success, PACE uses a holistic, strength-based and asset building model specifically responsive to the needs of girls and is recognized as among the most effective programs in the country for keeping girls from entering the juvenile justice system.

PACE's goals are to ensure that all girls have the opportunity to lead productive, engaged and fulfilling lives; prevent girls from entering the costly juvenile justice system and reduce the significant long term consequences to girls associated with teen pregnancy, substance abuse, dropping out of school, unemployment and long term economic dependency.

PACE operates in 19 counties throughout Florida, providing multi-faceted, gender-responsive services to more than 2,300 girls annually. Since 1985, PACE has been successful at reducing juvenile justice system involvement for girls with complex and interconnected risk factors and has successfully provided more than 37,000 girls with an opportunity for a better future. PACE Center for Girls is cited as a promising approach to help children avoid the "pipeline to prison" by the Children's Defense Fund; recognized as among the most effective programs in the country for keeping girls out of the juvenile justice system by the Girls Study Group, an interdisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners convened by the federal Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; and highlighted as an effective national program model for preventing girls from entering the juvenile justice system and finding success in school and communities by The Annie E. Casey Foundation's KIDS Count report.

Ruling Year

1985

President and CEO

Ms. Mary Marx

Main Address

PACE Center for Girls Corporate Office One West Adams Street, Suite 301

Jacksonville, FL 32202 USA

Keywords

girls, teens, teenage girls, young women, youth, education, alternative, gender-responsive, prevention, pregnancy, at-risk, self-esteem, skills, trauma-aware

EIN

59-2414492

 Number

5171240112

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve New!

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Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

PACE Center for Girls

Where we workNew!

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Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Percentage of PACE Girls who improve their academic performance while at PACE Center

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Females,

Adolescents (13-19 years),

At-risk youth

Related program

PACE Center for Girls

Context notes

2015 represents the "2016 Program Year," 7/1/2015 - 6/30/2016; 2014 represents the "2015 Program Year," 7/1/2014 - 6/30/2015; 2013 represents the "2013 Program Year," 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

Percentage of PACE Girls in school or employed one year after their transition from a PACE Center

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Females,

Adolescents (13-19 years),

At-risk youth

Related program

PACE Center for Girls

Context notes

2015 represents the "2016 Program Year," 7/1/2015 - 6/30/2016; 2014 represents the "2015 Program Year," 7/1/2014 - 6/30/2015; 2013 represents the "2013 Program Year," 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

Number of students enrolled

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Females,

Adolescents (13-19 years),

At-risk youth

Related program

PACE Center for Girls

Context notes

2015 represents the "2016 Program Year," 7/1/2015 - 6/30/2016; 2014 represents the "2015 Program Year," 7/1/2014 - 6/30/2015; 2013 represents the "2013 Program Year," 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

Percentage of PACE Girls who have no involvement with the juvenile justice system one year after leaving PACE Center

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Females,

Adolescents (13-19 years),

At-risk youth

Related program

PACE Center for Girls

Context notes

2015 represents the "2016 Program Year," 7/1/2015 - 6/30/2016; 2014 represents the "2015 Program Year," 7/1/2014 - 6/30/2015; 2013 represents the "2013 Program Year," 7/1/2013 - 6/30/2014

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have and haven't they accomplished so far?

PACE Center for Girls exists to prepare vulnerable middle and high school aged girls to harness and unleash their unrealized potential by ensuring their success in school and helping them chart their own unique path toward success in life. We are a not-for-profit 501(c)3 corporation that provides a gender-responsive, non-residential delinquency prevention and early intervention program model in 19 locations (“Centers") across Florida, targeting the unique needs of females 12 to 18 who are identified as dependent, truant, runaway, delinquent, or in need of academic skills. PACE's core program offers three key components – education, counseling and career/vocational focus on the future. Another important component of the program is transition services in which PACE continues to provide case management with girls who have returned to their assigned public school, graduated or are pursuing a vocation.

PACE PROGRAM COMPONENTS

--Academic services. Daily middle and high school level instruction using individualized academic plans and a girl's specific goals are monitored through regular advising sessions.
An average day at PACE is structured much like that of a traditional school. Girls circulate between classes, which usually include Language Arts, Math, Social Studies, and Science. Teachers play the additional role of Academic Advisor. Academic Advisors meet with girls biweekly to develop and monitor progress on individualized academic plans; these plans identify short- and long- term academic goals for each girl. PACE centers also have the ability to serve girls with special needs.

--Life Skills Curriculum. PACE-designed, gender-responsive curriculum addressing six domains believed to be essential for girls' development: physical, emotional, intellectual, relational, sexual and spiritual.
Possible topics covered during these class sessions include healthy eating, pregnancy, sexual health, body image, sexual identity, and stress management. In most centers, this curriculum is taught in a daily classroom setting.

--Individual assessment and care planning. Assessments of each girl's needs used to create tailored plans for the girl's time at PACE.
Early in a girl's time at PACE, a staff person uses a tool to assess her risk factors within five domains including family, school, health, behavior and victimization. During meetings with her counselor, the girl sets and reviews individualized goals to increase protective factors and reduce risk factors based on these needs.

--Individual and group counseling. Frequent individual sessions with counselors and regular psychoeducational group sessions.
Girls meet individually with the counselors at least biweekly to discuss progress on social service goals and provide referrals for additional supportive or therapeutic services. As additional needs or crises arise, girls are able to meet with their counselors.

--Parental engagement. Regular contact with parents or guardians to discuss progress or concerns.
During the first 30 days of a girl's time at PACE, her counselor conducts a home visit in order to better understand her circumstances and get to know her parent(s) or guardians. Thereafter, the counselor attempts to involve parents in a variety of ways.

--Community Service and Work Readiness. Volunteer service opportunities, career exploration and work readiness training.
Work readiness training can take a variety of forms, including a separate class for vocational skills and instruction incorporated into the life skills curriculum. Girls may take an assessment to identify possible careers and work with PACE staff to develop plans towards reaching their career goals.

--Transitional services. Follow up support for girls as they transition out of PACE and back to their home school or another appropriate placement.

PACE centers run year-round and girls attend classes daily during the usual school hours. Upon application, staff complete a thorough assessment of the girl's academic and biopsychosocial needs in order to both develop a plan for her time at PACE. Many girls come to PACE behind academically, and with a number of risk factors that are assessed regarding a girl's need for PACE's services. Girls receive academic and extensive social services at the center for approximately one year and often return to schools in their communities to complete their education.

Success at PACE is measured through completion rates, academic improvement, development of pro-social and emotional skills and recidivism rates. The completer rate is measured internally and assess the proportion of girls who successfully transitioned from PACE and includes outcomes that girls are expected to achieve while at PACE (academic progress, physical and mental health improvements, development of positive social-emotional skills and vocational/career readiness.) The academic improvement rate is measured externally through the Florida Department of Education using standardized test scores, grade promotions, credit completion and attainment of a GED or High School diploma for those who are age eligible. Involvement with the juvenile justice system and recidivism rates are measured externally by the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice which tracks the percentage of girls who had no involvement with this system within a year of transitioning from PACE. Placement status is measured internally and assesses the proportion of girls that are in school, enrolled in a higher education program or are employed a year after leaving PACE.

In FY15, PACE Center for Girls served 2,130 girls and of those girls, prior to PACE, 71% were failing one or more classes 33% had been suspended, 4% had been expelled and 29% had a learning disability. Further, 36% suffered from a mental health disorder, 15% had attempted suicide, 19% had been physically abused and 28% had a prior arrest. While at PACE, 87% of girls improved academically and after PACE, 76% successfully completed the program, 88% were in school, higher education, or employed after leaving PACE and 90% had no involvement with the juvenile justice system within one year of transition.

Currently, PACE is in the midst of a critical Random Control Trial evaluation that will add to the body of knowledge of what works with girls at-risk of delinquency and vulnerable to sexual exploitation. Our research partner, New-York based firm MDRC, has released a research brief that describes PACE Center for Girls, how we operate and provides an overview of the evaluation of the PACE model and the questions the study is designed to answer. One may read and review the briefing online, http://www.mdrc.org/publication/preventing-juvenile-justice-involvement-young-women.

Over the next several months MDRC will also be releasing a brief on gender responsive practices and in 2017 early impact findings with a final report to be released in 2018. The observations and insights received from this study will inform the strategies we undertake to increase impact and inform policy-makers for decades to come. This research is supported by the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation's Social Innovation Fund (SIF), a program of the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS); the Jessie Ball duPont Fund; and the Healy Foundation. The Social Innovation Fund combines public and private resources to grow the impact of innovative, community-based solutions that have compelling evidence of improving the lives of people in low-income communities throughout the United States.

External Reviews

Financials

PACE CENTER FOR GIRLS INC

Fiscal year: Jul 01 - Jun 30

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2017, 2016 and 2015
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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

Yes

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

Yes

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Yes

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Yes

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Yes

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

This organization reports that it does not collect this information.

Disability

This organization reports that it does not collect this information for Board Members.

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity