Central Care Mission of Orlando, Inc.

Faith Based & Science Driven

aka Central Care Mission   |   Orlando, FL   |  www.centralcaremission.com

Mission

Central Care Mission is a men's residential Life Skills Center. Participants develop life skills around five core areas: Spiritual, Vocational, Emotional, Financial, Physical. These life skills are framed with an overall Christian Worldview. We define success when residents obtain stable jobs and ongoing education, live in stable housing, own or have access to stable transportation, restore broken relationships and give back to the community. These powerful skills and critical outcomes significantly reduce the probability of poverty, homelessness, addictions, and the necessity to live in abusive circumstances.

Ruling year info

1993

President and CEO

Rev Spencer T Pfleiderer

Main address

4027 Lenox Blvd

Orlando, FL 32811 USA

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EIN

59-2800360

NTEE code info

Protestant (X21)

Employment Procurement Assistance and Job Training (J20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Life Skills

Four components make up the program of care: Number ONE: Life Skills - What we teach. Life skills are the foundational necessities needed to succeed in life. With out them our ability to function within ourselves, our families and our community is nearly impossible. The lack of life skills accounts for crime, poverty, homelessness, addiction and abuse. Spiritual - This is the cornerstone of the foundation. A person willing to humble themselves before their Creator will be open to information, correction, guidance and transformative change. This takes place through: Reading the BibleParticipation in a communityMeditationPrayerJournalingServing Financial - Taking care of our financial obligations eliminates a major stressor and trigger. Fear and lack of understanding are the key reasons people simply ignore their financial issues and hope they go away. They don't. They get worse. So we help them: Find employmentAssess and create a plan for eliminating debt: Legal, fines, taxes, credit cards, bad credit, school loans, child supportCreate a realistic budget that includes all components necessary to function in societyStart a saving account (internally)Open a checking and savings (externally)Provide education on mortgages, loans, rental agreements Vocational - This asks the question, ""What is your next best educational step?"" This includes attending four one hour classes per week. Resume writing,CertificationsVoTechCollege Emotional - This life skill focuses on our Emotional Quotient. Restoring relationships through giving and receiving forgivenessUnderstanding the emotional chain of pathologyAnger ManagementBoundaries Physical - This life skill is unique to Central Care Mission. All clients work out 45 minutes three times a week. Weight LiftingTeam Sports - Basketball, Volley Ball, Whiffle BallRunning or fast WalkingBike Riding - We have 10 bikes. Annually we go on a camping retreat to Georgia taking 70 men

Population(s) Served
Adults

Number TWO: Transformation Phases - How someone progresses through the program. Our program is built on four phases progressing sequentially one upon another. This allows the participant to build the life skills incrementally, without gettingcompletely overwhelmed. It provides benchmarks of progression in each of the five skill sets. These benchmarks are built on the cognitive/behavioral model of development. Classes four times a week focus on these benchmarks. The required reading, twenty book, provide the cognitive information. The behavioral components are monitored by Case Management. Continued willingness to work and progress through the program is a requirement. These four phases are:Phase One: Discovery - Being DependentlyPhase Two: Transformation - Learning to Live Intra-dependentlyPhase Three: Freedom - Learning to Live Inter-dependently Pase Four: Independence - Autonomy within Community

Population(s) Served
Adults
Older men
Young men
Homeless people
Substance abusers

Number THREE: Clinical Care - Who does the care and administrates the program. Case Manager (Jonathan Adams) - oversees the entire program and monitors the progress of all clients.Psychiatrists (Dr. Venuum) - mental health assessment and prescribing medication when necessaryPsychologists (Dr. McFall) - Providing intake evaluation, 25 hours of individual counseling for the duration of the program and bi-monthly group therapyTrauma Release Therapy (Don Wood) - This therapy provides a 2-3 hour session of releasing the emotional trauma related to past events. Then the program consists of three 30 day audio tracks reinforcing the initial therapy.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Older men
Young men
Homeless people
Substance abusers

Number FOUR: Pillars of Success - How our program is measured. Clean and Sober - free from the addictive use of potentially destructive substances Stable Job - not day labor, or even temporary employment, but an full-time job with foreseeable future employment.Stable Transportation - defined as a automobile, motorcycle, bicycle, or public transportationStable Housing - This does not include living in motels and hotels at exorbitant rates. This is renting, leasing, purchasing or sharing financial responsibilities of any of the above.Restored Relationships - This means that the person has been willing to restore any relationships with those who are willing to restore them. This also means the healthy avoidance of toxic relationships, whether family, spouses, former spouses, and friends.Community Involvement - This means that a person has embedded themselves into a healthy religious community. This community functions as social fabric, a safety net, and behavior accountability.

Population(s) Served
Homeless people
Older men
Young men
Substance abusers
Low-income people

Where we work

Awards

City Champion - State of the City Award 2011

Polis Institute

Gala-Taste of Compassion 2011

Orlando Magazine

Affiliations & memberships

National Coalition for the Homeless 1987

Second Harvest Food Bank 1987

American National Red Cross 1990

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

CCM is aiming to increase its capacity to serve more residents and to provide those residents with the best possible care leading to greater outcomes of success both corporately and individually. Our ultimate Goal is to move men back into society with the tools necessary to cope with daily pressures of life and the confidence to navigate through the difficulties all humans face. We assist men in Orlando, Orange County and the nation who are trapped in cycles of failure and poverty. We define poverty as deficiency in the following areas: physical (housing and health), emotional, spiritual, and financial (debts and fines) and vocational. We help them out of these cycles of poverty through the development of Life Skills. The outcomes we measure are: Is a man free from addictive behavior? Does he have the ability to get and keep a job? Does he have a stable place to live? Does he own or have access to reliable and consistent transportation? Has he tried to restore broken relationships and begun forming new ones? Is he involved in a spiritual community of support and accountability? The following Goals will help us accomplish these aims: Increasing our residents through program development.Completing a Capital Campaign by raising $2,000,000.Increasing our capacity from 51 to 100.

Goal 1. Increasing resident successes through program development. The strategies we will employ are: Increasing our clinical capacity by using a Psychiatrist for prescribing and monitoring medications, by providing a Psychologists for individual weekly evaluation and group therapy, and providing trauma release therapy.Researching ""Best Practices"" and measuring our successes against those practices, and changing our practices where we see gaps.Creating a Life Skill Curriculum based on best practices that is standardized or Codified and by partnering with other service providers when beneficial. Reaching out to universities for research collaboration and Independent Research of our program.Obtaining the most comprehensive and accurate data so we have a true understanding of all our success metrics. Goal 2. Completing a Capital or Comprehensive Campaign by raising $2,000,000The strategies we will employ are: Expanding Donor Base by from 300 (2015), 500 (2016), 750 (2017), to 5,000 (2020) Increasing our presence in the community by adding three key community board membersDeveloping a Funding Plan in partnership with Rollins CollegePerforming a Feasibility Study to determine our Capital Campaign capabilities.Meeting with the Major Foundations in the Orlando/Orange County areaHiring Director of Development beginning April 2017 Goal 3. Increasing our capacity from 51 to 100 residents The strategies we will employ are: Changing our IRS designation from a Standard Non-profit to a Religious Institute Non-profitRezoning our current properties for obtaining building permits and increasing our capacityPurchasing surrounding properties as they become availableConstruction of multi-purpose building In order to increase our capacity we have the goal of constructing a multi-purpose building. Our support facilities are stretched beyond our current housing capacity of 51 men.

Goal 1. Increasing resident successes through program development. We have hired a full-time case manager to oversee all our clinical applications and to keep accurate case management data. We have resident Psychiatrist who is retiring and is willing to do evaluations, write prescriptions and work with the other clinicians. We have a recently partnered with a licensed Psychologists to perform initial evaluations, group therapy and bi-weekly individual therapy. We have formed a business partnership Trauma Release Therapy. Don Wood is the CEO. This partnership will allow us to help those who have experienced debilitating trauma together with transforming the life skills that these individuals have missed. Those organizations we partner with who have expertise are Jobs Partnership, Career Source, GoodWill, Valencia College We have recently invested in Apricot, an outcome management system http://www.communitytech.net/solutions/apricot Goal 2. Completing a Capital or Comprehensive Campaign by raising $2,000,000 We have restarted our E-Tapestry Donor Development software program, by entering our last year's donors , both individually and from three fundraising events. Our next event will increase our donor base by 200. We will launch our new website in March 2016 with the integrative social media capabilities to greatly increasing our donor base. We have a staff person dedicated to the performance of this task. The President of CCM will be focusing on building relationships in the community with the expressed purpose of recruiting key board members. We have hired someone to help us Develop a Funding Plan We have the financial capacity to hire a consultant to do a Feasibility Study. Over the next two years it is our hope to raise enough funding at our annual Breakfast fundraiser to hire Director of Development beginning April 2017. This Development Director will prepare us for interfacing with the major foundations and community businesses. The total cost for three years will be approximately $210,000. Our minimum breakfast fundraising capacity for this same time period is $450,000. At our current amortization, we will pay off all our existing debt by 2020. This alone will free up nearly $40,000 (?) annually toward obtaining a loan. Once we have procured the proper zoning, we will be able to repurpose two existing buildings. This will increase our capacity by 33 clients. This will increase our cash flow by $206, 000 a year. Together these two funding sources represent nearly 1/4 of a million dollars annually. Goal 3. Increasing our capacity to from 51 to 100 residents The writing of this document allow us to apply for a change our IRS designation from a Standard Non-profit to a Religious Institute Non-profit Mack Cope is a land planner. He is helping us navigate rezoning of our current properties and for obtaining building permits. In order to increase our capacity we have the goal of constructing a multi-purpose building. Our facilities are stretched beyond our current capacity of 51 men. Hunton Brady has agreed to partner with us in producing the artist rendering and conceptual drawing as well as the architectural and mechanical drawings. **The mutli-purpose building would free up our existing building to house 33 additional residents. ** The addition would increase our capacity from 1 to 4 classrooms. ** The addition would increase our large gathering capacity from 50 - 200. ** The addition would simultaneously increase our community eating space from 0 - 150.

Duplex purchase: This purchase increases our capacity by 8. While it is good to have residents do the remodeling in an effort to cut costs, it can also lead to unnecessary cost increases due to mistakes and oversights. As a result we will hire a contractor to do all major remodeling or renovations.The 28 House purchase: This purchase increased our capacity by 4. In order to increase our capacity we have purchased houses rather than build new building on existing property not yet approved for capacity increases. The obstacles we now face in this model are less houses to purchase and no predictability of availability.Renting local properties. This increased our capacity by 2 and gives us physical presence on a piece of property we eventually want to purchase.Increased capacity form 36 to 51 in 2015: We have since slowed down this growth to give staff time to adjust and ensure quality control.Hired an Operation Director (non-resident): We've learned that using former residents in full-time salaried positions does not work.Hired a Case Manager (non-resident): We've learned that using former residents in full-time salaried positions does not work.Sub-contracting to a Psychologists Forming a partnership with Trauma Release TherapistIncreased our fleet of vans from three to five. It takes all five to get everyone to the same place at the same time. Consolidated all our debt at 0% interest and reduce length of time for payoff. We have slowed down our rate of debt elimination, albeit still aggressive, in order to hire staff to handle resident growth rates.We have increased our donor base from 300 to 500Changed the our major fundraiser venue and increased our revenue form $30,000 to $150,000.Our previous fundraiser was labor intensive and only net us 40% of proceeds. Our new model is less intensive and we retain 100% of proceeds.Purchase Apricot software for tracking data. Residents cannot be involved in any data input and it requires staff to do this.

Financials

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Central Care Mission of Orlando, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 7/22/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Brad Watkins

4Rivers Smokehouse

Term: 2019 - 2022


Board co-chair

Mr. Scott Howsare

First Choice Telecommunications

Term: 2019 - 2022

Gary Lehman

Medical Doctor Gary Lehman and Associates

Spence Pfleiderer

President/CEO Central Care Mission

Judy Beeler

Administrator Westminister Towers Orlando

LeSena Jones

Manager of Career & Workforce Education Valencia College

Joan Tiller

Vice President of Academic Affairs & Planning Valencia College

Scott Howsare

President First Choice Technology

Brad Watkins

Chairman/ Owner Fredrick Watkins Corporation

Robert Castillo

Senior Commercial Banker CRE/ Home Builder Finance Synovus Bank

Kris Gammon

Asst. Vice President, Resource Development Valencia College

Raymer Maguire

Maguire Lassman, PA

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? No
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? No
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data